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Bank of Canada set to release updated outlook for economy, inflation – The Battlefords News-Optimist

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OTTAWA — The Bank of Canada will release its updated outlook for the country’s pandemic-plagued economy.

The central bank in July said it believed the country had been spared from a worst-case scenario envisioned in April, but warned things could change.

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Governor Tiff Macklem has said a severe second wave of the pandemic, health restrictions that extend beyond December and the timing of a vaccine or other effective treatment could all shift the country’s economic course.

This morning the central bank will provide a more detailed analysis of its forecast for the domestic economy as the country marches through a second wave of COVID-19.

Macklem has said the central bank will keep its key policy rate as low at it can go at 0.25 per cent until the economy has recovered and inflation is back at the bank’s two-per-cent target.

That means experts don’t expect the central bank to change the rate from near-zero when the bank makes its announcement later this morning.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Oct. 28, 2020.

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UK borrowing to hit peacetime high as economy faces COVID-19 emergency – The Guardian

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By William Schomberg and David Milliken

LONDON (Reuters) – Britain will borrow almost 400 billion pounds this year to pay for the massive coronavirus hit to its economy, finance minister Rishi Sunak said on Wednesday, as he took his first steps to offset the country’s highest budget deficit outside wartime.

The world’s sixth-biggest economy is now set to shrink by 11.3% in 2020 – the most since “The Great Frost” of 1709 – before recovering by less than half of that in 2021, Sunak told parliament as he announced a one-year spending plan.

“Our health emergency is not yet over. And our economic emergency has only just begun,” he said, promising more money for health, infrastructure, defence and to fight unemployment.

Britain’s budget watchdog estimated borrowing would be 394 billion pounds ($526 billion) in the 2020/21 financial year that began in April, slightly more than it predicted in August.

At 19% of gross domestic product, the deficit will be almost double its level after the global financial crisis which took nearly a decade of unpopular spending squeezes to work down.

Sunak announced cuts to foreign aid spending and a freeze on pay for many public sector workers.

But with many public services still stretched, Sunak is expected to look more at tax rises to make up the shortfall.

“We have a responsibility, once the economy recovers, to return to a sustainable fiscal position,” he said on Wednesday.

Britain was hammered harder by the coronavirus pandemic than most other rich economies as it underwent a long lockdown.

Nearly 56,000 Britons have died from COVID-19, the highest death toll in Europe.

Even with recent positive news about vaccines, the Office for Budget Responsibility (OBR) said the economy was only likely to regain its pre-crisis size at the end of 2022 – or later if Britain fails to get a post-Brexit trade deal with the European Union before a transition arrangement expires on Dec. 31.

Sunak made no reference to Brexit in his speech.

YET MORE SPENDING

Since the pandemic struck Britain a few weeks after he took over as finance minister, the former Goldman Sachs analyst has rushed out emergency spending – much of it on pay subsidies to fend off a surge in unemployment – and tax cuts.

The shift away from the traditional economic orthodoxy of the Conservative Party has alarmed some lawmakers.

Sunak said the cost of his measures to fight the coronavirus was now 280 billion pounds for this year, up from a previous estimate of about 200 billion pounds.

Even so, long-term economic damage of roughly 3% of GDP was likely as a result of COVID-19, the OBR said.

Unemployment was likely to peak at 7.5%, from 4.8% now.

With that damage in mind, Sunak sought to stress how spending would rise in the short term as Britain grapples with the fallout from the pandemic.

Over this year and next, day-to-day spending will rise by 3.8% in inflation-adjusted terms, the fastest growth rate in 15 years.

To meet Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s promise of “levelling up” growth around the country, 100 billion pounds will be spent next year on longer-term investments, 27 billion pounds more than last year.

A new national infrastructure bank will be based in the north of England, where many voters broke with tradition and backed Johnson in last year’s election.

Johnson later told Conservative lawmakers at a meeting of the 1922 Committee that he was confident the British economy could bounce back quickly, and that his government would deliver for the people who elected him, a lawmaker attending the meeting said.

The OBR said it would take 1% of GDP of spending cuts or tax hikes to bring the government’s day-to-day spending into line with its revenues. Debt was likely to rise further, to over 109% of GDP in 2023/24, up from about 101% now.

Paul Johnson, head of the Institute for Fiscal Studies think-tank, said the headline numbers were “completely staggering” but hid a squeeze on spending in three or four years’ time which would be challenging to deliver.

Sunak signalled some early cost-saving moves, including the freeze on pay for public sector workers, except for doctors, nurses, other health staff and the lowest-paid public sector workers.

And Britain will save 3 billion pounds a year by cutting overseas aid spending to 0.5% of GDP, a level that remains higher than almost all other rich countries.

The Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby said the cut was “shameful and wrong”, former Prime Minister David Cameron said the government had broken a promise to the poorest countries of the world, and the government’s minister for sustainable development resigned.

(Writing by William Schomberg; Editing by Catherine Evans and Jan Harvey)

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UK borrowing to hit peacetime high as economy faces COVID-19 emergency – TheChronicleHerald.ca

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By William Schomberg and David Milliken

LONDON (Reuters) – Britain will borrow almost 400 billion pounds this year to pay for the massive coronavirus hit to its economy, finance minister Rishi Sunak said on Wednesday, as he took his first steps to offset the country’s highest budget deficit outside wartime.

The world’s sixth-biggest economy is now set to shrink by 11.3% in 2020 – the most since “The Great Frost” of 1709 – before recovering by less than half of that in 2021, Sunak told parliament as he announced a one-year spending plan.

“Our health emergency is not yet over. And our economic emergency has only just begun,” he said, promising more money for health, infrastructure, defence and to fight unemployment.

Britain’s budget watchdog estimated borrowing would be 394 billion pounds ($526 billion) in the 2020/21 financial year that began in April, slightly more than it predicted in August.

At 19% of gross domestic product, the deficit will be almost double its level after the global financial crisis which took nearly a decade of unpopular spending squeezes to work down.

Sunak announced cuts to foreign aid spending and a freeze on pay for many public sector workers.

But with many public services still stretched, Sunak is expected to look more at tax rises to make up the shortfall.

“We have a responsibility, once the economy recovers, to return to a sustainable fiscal position,” he said on Wednesday.

Britain was hammered harder by the coronavirus pandemic than most other rich economies as it underwent a long lockdown.

Nearly 56,000 Britons have died from COVID-19, the highest death toll in Europe.

Even with recent positive news about vaccines, the Office for Budget Responsibility (OBR) said the economy was only likely to regain its pre-crisis size at the end of 2022 – or later if Britain fails to get a post-Brexit trade deal with the European Union before a transition arrangement expires on Dec. 31.

Sunak made no reference to Brexit in his speech.

YET MORE SPENDING

Since the pandemic struck Britain a few weeks after he took over as finance minister, the former Goldman Sachs analyst has rushed out emergency spending – much of it on pay subsidies to fend off a surge in unemployment – and tax cuts.

The shift away from the traditional economic orthodoxy of the Conservative Party has alarmed some lawmakers.

Sunak said the cost of his measures to fight the coronavirus was now 280 billion pounds for this year, up from a previous estimate of about 200 billion pounds.

Even so, long-term economic damage of roughly 3% of GDP was likely as a result of COVID-19, the OBR said.

Unemployment was likely to peak at 7.5%, from 4.8% now.

With that damage in mind, Sunak sought to stress how spending would rise in the short term as Britain grapples with the fallout from the pandemic.

Over this year and next, day-to-day spending will rise by 3.8% in inflation-adjusted terms, the fastest growth rate in 15 years.

To meet Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s promise of “levelling up” growth around the country, 100 billion pounds will be spent next year on longer-term investments, 27 billion pounds more than last year.

A new national infrastructure bank will be based in the north of England, where many voters broke with tradition and backed Johnson in last year’s election.

Johnson later told Conservative lawmakers at a meeting of the 1922 Committee that he was confident the British economy could bounce back quickly, and that his government would deliver for the people who elected him, a lawmaker attending the meeting said.

The OBR said it would take 1% of GDP of spending cuts or tax hikes to bring the government’s day-to-day spending into line with its revenues. Debt was likely to rise further, to over 109% of GDP in 2023/24, up from about 101% now.

Paul Johnson, head of the Institute for Fiscal Studies think-tank, said the headline numbers were “completely staggering” but hid a squeeze on spending in three or four years’ time which would be challenging to deliver.

Sunak signalled some early cost-saving moves, including the freeze on pay for public sector workers, except for doctors, nurses, other health staff and the lowest-paid public sector workers.

And Britain will save 3 billion pounds a year by cutting overseas aid spending to 0.5% of GDP, a level that remains higher than almost all other rich countries.

The Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby said the cut was “shameful and wrong”, former Prime Minister David Cameron said the government had broken a promise to the poorest countries of the world, and the government’s minister for sustainable development resigned.

(Writing by William Schomberg; Editing by Catherine Evans and Jan Harvey)

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Unchanged from early estimate, US economy grew 33.1% in Q3 – OrilliaMatters

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WASHINGTON — The second of three estimates on U.S. growth for the July-September quarter was unchanged at a record pace of 33.1%. But a resurgence in the coronavirus is expected to slow growth sharply in the current quarter with some economists even raising the spectre of a double-dip recession.

While the overall increase in the country’s total output of goods and services was static, the Commerce Department reported Wednesday, some components were revised.

Bigger gains in business investment, housing and exports were offset by downward revisions to state and local government spending, business inventories and consumer spending.

The 33.1% gain was the largest quarterly gain on records going back to 1947 and surpassed the old mark of a 16.7% surge in 1950.

Still, the economy has not fully recovered from output lost in the first six months of the year when GDP suffered a record-shattering drop of 31.4% in the second quarter. That followed a slide at an annual rate of 5% in the first quarter as when the pandemic shut down much of the economy and triggered millions of layoffs.

Economists are concerned that growth has slowed sharply in the current October-December and there are fears that GDP could dip back into negative territory in the first three months of next year.

Mark Zandi, chief economist at Moody’s Analytics, said he had forecast GDP growth of around 2% in the fourth quarter, with the real possibility of GDP turning negative in the first quarter of next year.

Economists at JPMorgan Chase have trimmed their forecast for the first quarter to a negative 1% GDP rate. “This winter will be grim and we believe the economy will contract again in the first quarter,” the JPMorgan economists wrote in a research note.

“The economy is going to be very uncomfortable between now and when we get the next fiscal rescue package,” Zandi said. “If lawmakers can’t get it together, it will be very difficult for the economy to avoid going back into a recession.”

While lawmakers have returned for a lame-duck session, there has been no progress so far in narrowing the differences between Democrats who are pushing for a big package of $1 trillion or more, and Senate Republicans who are refusing to approve anything above approximately $500 billion.

More than 9 million people will lose their unemployment benefits at the end of the year when two jobless benefit programs are set to expire unless Congress extends them.

At the same time virus cases are surging, triggering a number of states to re-impose business limits such as earlier closing times for bars and restaurants and stricter limits on the number of in-store shoppers.

Martin Crutsinger, The Associated Press


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