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Bank of Canada signals rate hike in 2022, tapers bond purchases

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Bank of Canada expecting strong growth

By Julie Gordon and David Ljunggren

OTTAWA (Reuters) -The Bank of Canada signaled on Wednesday that it could start hiking interest rates in late 2022, as it sharply boosted its outlook for the Canadian economy and reduced the scope of its bond buying program.

The central bank said it now expects economic slack to be absorbed in the second half of 2022, from a previous forecast of into 2023. It held its key overnight rate steady at 0.25%.

Governor Tiff Macklem, speaking to reporters after the decision, made clear that while the bank is committed to refrain from raising rates until the economy is running at full capacity, there is no guarantee borrowing costs will rise when those conditions are met.

“What we do when those conditions are met, we’ll have to assess that at the time. There’s nothing mechanical,” he said, adding: “We’re looking for a full recovery, we’re not going to count our chickens before they’re hatched.”

The Bank also said it now believes the COVID-19 pandemic will be “less detrimental” than previously assessed to the economy’s potential output.

Canada‘s annual inflation rate doubled to 2.2% in March, Statistics Canada said separately, in part due to a statistical effect caused by a sharp deceleration last year during the coronavirus pandemic.

The Bank of Canada targets the midpoint of an control range of 1% to 3%. It expects inflation to temporarily rise to about 3% this year, before falling to around 2% in the second half. It will then fall further in early 2022 before recovering.

Canada‘s economy is expected to grow 6.5% in 2021, up from a forecast of 4.0% in January, the central bank said in its spring Monetary Policy Report, also released Wednesday.

It sees economic growth in the United States, which is Canada‘s largest trading partner, at 7.0% this year, up from 5.0%.

Much of the growth comes down to a massive U.S. stimulus plan passed in March and Canada‘s own stimulus package, unveiled Monday as part of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s government‘s first budget in more than two years.

“Our projection at a macro level really captures the fiscal stimulus that has been announced both by provincial governments and to a large degree the federal government,” said Macklem.

BOND TAPERING

The Bank of Canada cut its weekly net purchases of Canadian government bonds to a target of C$3 billion ($2.4 billion) from C$4 billion, saying the adjustment reflected the progress made in the economic recovery.

“Certainly this is a more hawkish statement that begins to lay the foundations for the removal of the substantial monetary policy support that has been put in place over the past year,” said Josh Nye, senior economist at RBC Economics.

While recent job growth looks positive, the Bank warned it may take considerable time for full employment to be reached. Due to population growth, Canada needs to add 475,000 jobs to return to its pre-pandemic employment rate, it said.

The Canadian dollar strengthened as much as 1.2% to 1.2459 per greenback, or 80.26 U.S. cents, its biggest gain since last June, while Canada‘s 2-year yield jumped about 4 basis points to 0.334%.

(Reporting by Julie Gordon and David Ljunggren, additional reporting by Steve Scherer, Fergal Smith, Nia Williams, Jeff Lewis and Moira Warburton; Editing by Franklin Paul, Paul Simao and David Gregorio)

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Economy

Canadian dollar moves to extend weekly win streak as oil rebounds

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Canadian dollar

The Canadian dollar strengthened against its U.S. counterpart on Friday and was on track for its seventh straight weekly gain as oil prices rose and domestic data added to evidence of robust economic growth in the first quarter.

Canadian factory sales rose 3.5% in March from February, led by the motor vehicle, petroleum and coal, and food product industries, while wholesale trade was up 2.8%, Statistics Canada said.

The price of oil, one of Canada‘s major exports, reversed some of the previous day’s sharp losses as stock markets strengthened, though gains were capped by the coronavirus situation in major oil consumer India and the restart of a fuel pipeline in the United States.

U.S. crude prices rose 1.2% to $64.61 a barrel, while the Canadian dollar was trading 0.6% higher at 1.2093 to the greenback, or 82.69 U.S. cents, moving back in reach of Wednesday’s 6-year peak at 1.2042.

For the week, the loonie was on track to gain 0.3%. It has climbed more than 5% since the start of the year, the biggest gain among G10 currencies, supported by surging commodity prices and a shift last month to a more hawkish stance by the Bank of Canada.

Still, BoC Governor Tiff Macklem said on Thursday if the currency continues to rise, it could create headwinds for exports and business investment as well as affecting monetary policy.

The U.S. dollar fell against a basket of major currencies, pressured by a recovery in risk appetite across markets after Federal Reserve officials helped calm concerns about a quick policy tightening in response to accelerating U.S. inflation.

Canadian government bond yields were lower across much of a flatter curve, with the 10-year down 2 basis points at 1.549%. On Thursday, it touched its highest intraday in eight weeks at 1.624%.

 

(Reporting by Fergal Smith; Editing by Nick Zieminski)

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Toronto Stock Exchange rises 1.21% to 19,366.69

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Toronto Stock Exchange

* The Toronto Stock Exchange‘s TSX rises 1.21 percent to 19,366.69

* Leading the index were SNC-Lavalin Group Inc <SNC.TO​>, up 16.0%, Village Farms International Inc​, up 9.8%, and Denison Mines Corp​, higher by 9.4%.

* Lagging shares were Aurora Cannabis Inc​​, down 7.2%, Centerra Gold Inc​, down 3.8%, and Canadian National Railway Co​, lower by 3.7%.

* On the TSX 194 issues rose and 35 fell as a 5.5-to-1 ratio favored advancers. There were 25 new highs and no new lows, with total volume of 225.7 million shares.

* The most heavily traded shares by volume were Enbridge Inc, Manulife Financial Corp and Cenovus Energy Inc.

* The TSX’s energy group rose 3.32 points, or 2.7%, while the financials sector climbed 4.80 points, or 1.3%.

* West Texas Intermediate crude futures rose 2.65%, or $1.69, to $65.51 a barrel. Brent crude  rose 2.68%, or $1.8, to $68.85 [O/R]

* The TSX is up 11.1% for the year.

This summary was machine generated May 14 at 21:03 GMT.

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Economy

U.S., Mexico, Canada to hold ‘robust’ talks on trade deal

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The United States, Mexico and Canada will next week hold their first formal talks on their continental trade deal, with particular focus on labor and environmental obligations, the U.S. government said on Friday.

Trade ministers from the three nations are set to meet virtually on Monday and Tuesday to discuss the U.S.-Mexico-Canada (USMCA) deal, which took effect in July 2020.

“The ministers will receive updates about work already underway to advance cooperation … and will hold robust discussions about USMCA’s landmark labor and environmental obligations,” the office of U.S. Trade Representative Katherine Tai said in a statement.

The United States is also reviewing tariffs which may be leading to inflation in the country, economic adviser Cecilia Rouse told reporters at the White House on Friday, a move that could affect hundreds of billions of dollars in trade.

The United States, testing provisions in the new deal aimed at strengthening Mexican unions, this week asked Mexico to investigate alleged abuses at a General Motors Co factory.

(Reporting by David Ljunggren; Editing by Hugh Lawson and Jonathan Oatis)

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