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BC man sick with COVID-19 calls it a 'horrible disease' – Fernie Free Press

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Tim Green describes himself as an active person. The 41-year-old Greater Victoria-area resident says under normal circumstances he would paddle twice a week, hike nearby Mt. Finlayson weekly, walk every day, and swim.

That was before he contracted COVID-19.

“Now I am unable to walk down the street, I am so winded,” he said in the email to Black Press Media from his home in Esquimalt. “I am so grateful that my lungs were healthy prior to getting sick. I can see how people with weaker lungs and hearts would not be able to cough to clear the lungs and would need intensive care.”

Overall, Green describes COVID-19 as a “horrible illness” to be avoided at all costs. “It is draining, and I wouldn’t wish it on anyone,” he said. “I have extreme coughing fits every hour to clear my lungs. I have no energy. My body aches, but the chest and lower back are very sore.”

Contracting the new coronavirus has fortified his perspective. “I was following the directives from the [provincial health officer],” he said. “Even with them changing, nearly daily, my family and I were taking things seriously. I am adamant that people need to stay home. It makes me so angry seeing people test the limits of the directives. Just stay home.”

RELATED: ‘It’s up to us: Recently-returned B.C. couple urges Canadians to take COVID-19 seriously

Green says he does not know the source of his illness. “I was not in contact with international travelers or anyone that I know of that was ill,” he said.

Green started to learn of his condition after he had called his nurse practitioner on March 23 and described his symptoms. “It was early, but the signs were pointing to COVID,” he said.

By March 26 the symptoms had progressed to being fully consistent with COVID-19 and Green said he was told he was a presumptive case.

“I thought I had allergies, with itchy, gritty eyes, sore throat and sinus irritation,” Green said. “It then developed where it felt like I could never clear my throat. When I called the nurse practitioner, I had a low grade fever, and my upper chest was feeling congested. It has progressed to my lower lungs. I am coughing consistently, trying to clear the chest.”

Green’s initial reaction was one of surprise, even disbelief. “And then I was thinking back to all the places I had been, and what I had done and where I could have been infected.”

Green said he did not receive any medical treatment beyond Tylenol, tea, steam and bed rest. But he received a lot of support through social media, once he shared his diagnosis. “I posted that I was diagnosed on Facebook because it wasn’t a secret to be kept.”


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Promising results from VIDO-InterVac's COVID-19 vaccine pre-clinical trials – paNOW

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Several weeks ago, two doses of vaccine were given to the animals. Time was needed to then assess their immune response against a control group.

So how effective exactly is the vaccine so far?

“In the vaccinated animals – the ones that responded to the vaccine – we saw almost undetectable amounts of virus afterwards,” says Gerdts. “So, that’s very good news, and in comparison to the control group per swap… this is a range in a 50,000 fold reduction of it.”

All of the ferrets that were infected received what Gerdts says is a ‘high’ dose, or one million particles of the disease. Depending on exposure levels, it’s not even in the range of what a human would be exposed to, even with a high ‘virus shedder.’

Data on the lungs of the ferrets is still being analysed, but initial results indicate a very high immune response as well as high levels of neutralizing antibodies. It does not appear as though any other organs were affected by the virus either.

At this point, Gerdts says they are now in the midst of producing clinical grade vaccine doses that can be used in humans. He calls it the most time consuming part of the vaccine development.

In the meantime, they’re also conducting safety studies – which are required by regulators to essentially move on to human trials.

“In these safety studies, we’ll address whether there’s any unwanted effects or any adverse events to the vaccine. And also with this particular disease there is concern about what is called ‘disease enhancement’ where the vaccine would actually enhance the disease. So, there’s particular studies that will help us to rule out that our vaccine will do that.”

Gerdts admits that there is some concern that certain vaccines being developed currently may actually make the disease worse. It happened when a vaccine was developed for the virus that causes Dengue Fever several years ago.

“The technology that we have chosen is one that has a very well proven track record in humans and animals… and the advantage of that, is that it’s easily ‘scalable.’ So, at the end, we can produce millions of doses in a single run in a manufacturing facility. So while maybe it’s a bit slower at the moment, the advantage of our vaccine will be that it’s easier to scale and more cost effective.”

If all goes well, human trials are scheduled to begin in the fall.

“This is a vaccine made by Canadians for Canadians. So, we will make sure that our vaccine is available to Canadians at the highest priority.”

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Donald Trump Says He Is No Longer Taking Malaria Drug Hydroxychloroquine For Coronavirus – Yahoo Style

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<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Click here to read the full article. ” data-reactid=”19″>Click here to read the full article.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="After weeks of singing the praises of the anti-malaria drug hydroxychloroquine as a preventative measure against the coronavirus, and saying last week that was taking the drug himself, President Donald Trump revealed in an interview on Sinclair Broadcasting on Sunday that he had “Finished, just finished,” his course of the unproven treatment. “And by the way, I’m still here…To the best of my knowledge, here I am.”” data-reactid=”20″>After weeks of singing the praises of the anti-malaria drug hydroxychloroquine as a preventative measure against the coronavirus, and saying last week that was taking the drug himself, President Donald Trump revealed in an interview on Sinclair Broadcasting on Sunday that he had “Finished, just finished,” his course of the unproven treatment. “And by the way, I’m still here…To the best of my knowledge, here I am.”

That, on the same day the World Health Organization placed a pause in COVID-19-related testing of hydroxychloroquine after the esteemed medical journal The Lancet published a finding that, among patients with coronavirus who received the drug, the authors “estimated a higher mortality rate.”

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="More from Deadline” data-reactid=”22″>More from Deadline

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="The Food and Drug Administration had also issued a warning of potential harmful side effects to the drug, including ventricular tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation and, in some cases, death. But Trump has still promoted it as a potential effective treatment for the virus.” data-reactid=”31″>The Food and Drug Administration had also issued a warning of potential harmful side effects to the drug, including ventricular tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation and, in some cases, death. But Trump has still promoted it as a potential effective treatment for the virus.

“I happen to be taking it…Right now,” Trump said to surprised reporters at the White House last Monday. “Yeah. Couple weeks ago I started taking it. Cause I think it is good. I have heard a lot of good stories. And if it is not good, I will tell you, alright, I am not going to get hurt by it.”

“What do you have to lose?” Trump said at the time.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Sign up for Deadline’s Newsletter. For the latest news, follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.” data-reactid=”34″>Sign up for Deadline’s Newsletter. For the latest news, follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

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Trump says he's done taking hydroxychloroquine, unproven treatment for COVID-19 – CTV News

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TORONTO —
U.S. President Donald Trump is no longer taking the malaria drug hydroxychloroquine, he said in an interview Sunday, after weeks of promoting it as a treatment for the novel coronavirus.

In an interview with Sinclair Broadcast’s program “Full Measure With Sharyl Attkisson,” Trump said he had completed a two-week course of the drug, which has not been proven to prevent or treat COVID-19.

“Finished, just finished, yeah,” he said. “And by the way, I’m still here. To the best of my knowledge, here I am.”

A week ago, Trump revealed that he had been taking the drug himself to protect against the virus, despite his own officials cautioning that the drug should not be used outside of hospital or research settings, due to potentially fatal side effects.

His doctor did not prescribe it to him, he said. He requested it specifically.

The FDA-approved drug is used to treat malaria as well as lupus and arthritis. Trump has frequently touted it as a potential treatment in his press briefings, citing anecdotal evidence and limited studies.

In the Full Measure interview, Trump said he took the drug because two staffers in the White House had tested positive, reiterating that he had heard “tremendous reports” about the drug’s effects.

“[Hydroxychloroquine] has had tremendous, if you look at it, tremendous, rave reviews,” he said.

No rigorous, large-scale study has found the drug to be effective for treating or preventing COVID-19.

The World Health Organization announced Monday that it was temporarily dropping hydroxychloroquine from its list of experimental treatments under study. The WHO pointed to a paper published last week in the Lancet that said those taking the drug could be at a higher risk of death and heart problems. 

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