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Biden on anti-mask ordinances: 'This isn't about politics — this is about keeping our children safe' – CNN

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(CNN)President Joe Biden on Thursday hit out at anti-masking protesters for politicizing the Covid-19 pandemic, saying he was particularly disturbed by scenes at a school board meeting in Tennessee earlier this week.

During remarks on his plan to lower prescription drug costs, Biden said there are people in America who are “trying to turn a public safety measure, that is children wearing masks in school so they can be safe, into a political dispute.”
“This isn’t about politics. This is about keeping our children safe,” Biden said at the start of remarks at the White House Thursday afternoon.
The President specifically pointed to a recent protest in Williamson County, Tennessee, where anti-mask activists harassed public health officials at a school board meeting testifying in favor of mask mandates in schools to prevent the spread of Covid-19.
With the highly contagious Delta variant, Covid-19 cases and hospitalizations among children have been on the rise. The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends students from kindergarten through grade 12 wear masks in school, along with teachers and visitors, while the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends masks in schools for everyone over age two.
“You know, our health care workers are heroes. They were the heroes when there was no vaccine. Many of them gave their lives trying to save others. And they’re heroes again with a vaccine,” Biden said. “They’re doing their best to care for the people refusing to get vaccinated, and unvaccinated folks are being hospitalized and dying as a result of not being vaccinated.”
The President went on to applaud “the mayors, school superintendents, educators, local leaders, who are standing up to the governors politicizing masks, protection for our kids,” adding, “thank God that we have heroes like you, and I stand with you all, and America should as well.”
Previously, Biden and members of his administration have specifically targeted the governors of Florida and Texas for standing in the way of mask and vaccine requirements, pointing to the extraordinary amount of Covid cases and hospitalizations in their states. Earlier Thursday, the White House Covid-19 team confirmed they’d increased their shipments of monoclonal antibody treatments to Florida eightfold over the past month. They’ve also sent additional ventilators to the state.

”Prescription drug prices are outrageously expensive in America’

As part of his scheduled remarks, Biden made the case for his plan to lower prescription drug prices, expanding upon his recent executive orders and efforts in his “Build Back Better” agenda proposals to Congress.
The President said he didn’t want to diminish the “groundbreaking” work by pharmaceutical companies, like the development of the Covid-19 vaccine, but added that “we can make a distinction between developing these breakthroughs and jacking up prices on a range of medications for a range of everyday diseases and conditions.”
He pointed to the fact that the US pays “the highest prescription drug costs of any developed nation in the world,” cited skyrocketing prices for insulin, as well as medications to treat multiple sclerosis, cancer and rheumatoid arthritis.
He also recalled chipping in with his siblings to cover the cost his mother’s medications, adding that similar situations across the country have “forced people into terrible choices, between maintaining their health, paying their rent or the mortgage, putting food on the table — I mean literally.”
The order continues a historic Trump administration push to allow states to import prescription drugs from Canada, where government regulation keeps down the cost of medications. It directs the US Food and Drug Administration to work with states to safely import drugs, which Biden had supported during his presidential campaign.
The executive order directs the Department of Health and Human Services to issue a plan within 45 days to combat high prescription drug prices and price gouging. It also cracks down on shipping costs for companies and prescription drug costs for Americans.
He pointed to the fact that new prescription drugs can get a patent and be distributed in the US for 12 years without competition, but added that “unfortunately it often takes a long time, years and years, for” generic versions of those drugs to be released into the US market after the 12-year period.
“These things by themselves will be a great help but to really solve the problem we need Congress to act. That’s what my Build Back Better plan will do,” the President said.
Part of his proposals to Congress would “give Medicare the power to negotiate lower drug prices” and allow Medicare prices to be available to private insurance companies.
He also pointed to proposals to expand Medicare coverage to dental, vision and hearing, as well as the assembly of the Advanced Research Projects Agency for Health (ARPA-H).
“I’m not criticizing companies that aren’t prepared to spend billions of dollars on certain projects to research. I get it. But if they’re not, we should, to make sure that Americans are covered,” the President said.

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Women in politics | Watch News Videos Online – Globalnews.ca

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Historically, women have been chronically under-represented in politics. Many are saying have two women in the race to become the next Manitoba PC Leader and Premier is a step in the right direction. But as Marney Blunt reports, there’s still a long way to go for equity in the political world.

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Texas politics takes over American politics – POLITICO

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A strict new abortion law kicked off a huge national backlash. Thousands of Haitian migrants seeking asylum prompted mass deportations and scrutiny on Border Patrol policy. State officials announced four new reviews of the 2020 vote.

And that was just in September — and just in Texas.

The massive, Republican-controlled state has dominated the national political spotlight this year, driving increasingly conservative policies into the heart of big debates over everything from voting to public health initiatives, critical race theory and more. These legislative moves have positioned Texas as a counterweight to Democratic-dominated Washington — and a leader charting the potential course of the Republican Party nationally.

This year, the state was one of the first to reverse mask mandates and block local Covid-19 vaccine requirements. In the summer, Democratic state lawmakers fled Texas for a month to delay GOP voting legislation, which passed shortly after they returned. Laws that allowed carrying a gun without a permit, penalized reducing police budgets in large cities and limited discussion of systemic racism in classrooms went into effect on Sept. 1.

And other times, big events in Texas took center stage: A massive winter storm exposed the state’s weak energy infrastructure in February, and Texas’ southern border has been at the front of this month’s national news.

Even for a big state, Texas has seen an outsized amount of political attention as conservatives try to break new ground, expanding on decades of GOP control and a national political environment that tilts toward Republicans. Two more key trends are also behind the attention-grabbing policy drive: The Republican governor is preparing to face primary challengers in his 2022 reelection race and potential presidential run, while conflicts are mushrooming between diverse, liberal cities and the Republican-dominated state government — mirroring the same tensions animating national politics.

“You put all those things together, and I think there’s been basically no lane markers for Republicans in this session,” said James Henson, director of the Texas Politics Project, which conducts public opinion polling in the state. “They’re very confident about the 2022 election given recent precedents and… a Democrat in the White House, so there have been no natural checks.”

Former President Donald Trump’s influence still looms large in the state’s politics — as seen in his open letter to GOP Gov. Greg Abbott last week. Trump demanded the state legislature pass House Bill 16, which would allow state officials to request an electoral audit for future elections as well as for 2020.

Despite Trump’s nearly 6-point win over Biden in Texas last year, the secretary of State’s office soon announced a “full and comprehensive forensic audit” of Collin, Dallas and Tarrant counties in the Dallas-Fort Worth area, as well as Houston’s Harris County. The release did not provide any details but said the agency expects the state legislature to fund the effort.

Former Texas Secretary of State Ruth Hughs, who previously called the 2020 election “smooth and secure,” resigned in May when the state Senate did not take up her nomination. The Texas secretary of State’s office is currently helmed by a former Abbott staffer on an interim basis.

In a Fox News Sunday interview, Abbott said election audits by the Texas secretary of State’s office already began “months ago.”

“There are audits of every aspect of government,” Abbott said when asked about the potential waste of taxpayer money. “Why do we audit everything in this world, but people raise their hands in concern when we audit elections, which is fundamental to our democracy?”

But the top executives in three of the four counties have called the move unnecessary: “It’s time to move on,” Republican Tarrant County Judge Glen Whitley told the Texas Tribune.

After thousands of Haitian migrants fled to Del Rio this month, Abbott directed hundreds of state troopers and Texas National Guard members to create a “steel wall” with patrol vehicles to prevent more people from entering the country. The state has budgeted more than $3 billion over the next two years on border security, adding nearly $2 billion of that funding earlier this month.

“Because the Biden administration is refusing to do its duty to enforce the laws of the United States, they have left Texas in no position other than for us to step up and do what we have to do,” Abbott said of his decision to forcibly stop and imprison migrants this month.

“As much as these issues are in the national news, they’re very, very local,” said GOP state Rep. James White. The national attention after the recent border struggles, for example, could “move the discussion where we need it. … Maybe it moves [Biden] to really pick up his game.”

The past few months have also stirred up new engagement among Democrats, said Democratic state Rep. Ron Reynolds, one of the more than 50 lawmakers who walked out of the first special session in July to meet with federal lawmakers in Washington.

“All of these things play out, people really understand like, ‘Oh, this isn’t normal? You mean other states aren’t doing this?’” Reynolds said. “It helps lay people understand that this isn’t just politics, this isn’t normal.”

The scale of conservative policies has been a “game changer” for Democratic state Rep. Erin Zwiener’s constituents, she said. Legislation like Senate Bill 8, which allows virtually anyone to sue someone who had assisted with an abortion after six weeks, didn’t get as much fanfare during the regular legislative session this year because of the baseline confidence in Roe v. Wade.

Her district’s mix of suburban and rural constituents didn’t think they needed to vote on issues like those, Zwiener added. The onslaught of agenda items about gun control, voter rights and other Abbott priorities didn’t help, she said.

“It’s hard for anybody to decide what to pay attention to when there’s a new crisis every day,” the state representative said. “People just had a hard time keeping up with which thing they should be angry about that day.”

As for the governor’s seat, many in the state are still skeptical of the possibility of ousting Abbott, especially since assumed candidate Beto O’Rourke hasn’t even made an announcement yet. Reynolds said if O’Rourke maintains a centrist message, he could be in a good position to win over vulnerable moderates and independents that are increasingly disappointed in Abbott’s performance.

While some Democrats in the state are cautiously hopeful about a changing tide, Zwiener said it will take a much more concerted effort to prove Texas is more of a swing state than others assume.

“Democrats have been out-organized by Republicans, and we’re not going to start to win and win sustainably until we match them for that organizing and think beyond the next election,” Zwiener said.

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Letter: Playing politics with the virus – Cowichan Valley Citizen

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Playing politics with the virus

Have always been of the opinion that politicians worldwide chose to play politics with the COVID-19 virus instead of stopping it from spreading by closing their respective international borders. Either they learned nothing from the Spanish flu pandemic which spread worldwide via the soldiers returning from the First World War or they chose to ignore it?

It appears that these viruses have a definitive life cycle. The Spanish flu faded into oblivion after the forth wave. The P.H.O for B.C informed us that all pandemics have four waves. So if they knew how the COVID-19 virus would react, how many waves there would be etc. why did they not take steps to prevent it from arriving in Canada? Politics, is my opinion. How many elections have we had in Canada, called by political parties whose only ambition is extending their power base and time in office?

My cynicism and distrust of the motives for the handling of this virus were confirmed while reading the following.

Dame Sarah Gilbert, the lead scientist from Oxford University, and the brain behind the vaccine manufactured in India as Covishield, stated the following: “The virus cannot completely mutate because its spike protein has to interact with the ACE2 receptor on the surface of the human cell, in order to get inside it. If it changes its spike protein so much that it can’t interact with that receptor, then it’s not going to be able to get inside the cell. So, there aren’t many places for the virus to go to have something that will evade immunity but still remain infectious.”

Dr. Gilbert is reported as saying that the virus that causes COVID-19 will eventually become like the coronaviruses which circulate widely and cause the common cold.

She also stated, “What tends to happen over time is there’s just a slow drift, that’s what happens with flu viruses. You see small changes accumulating over a period of time and then we have the opportunity to react to that.”

“It has been pretty quiet since Delta emerged and it would be nice to think there won’t be any new variants of concern. If I was pushed to predict, I think there will be new variants emerging over time and I think there is still quite a lot of road to travel down with this virus,” she said.

So thanks to our political masters, we are going to have this virus around for some time. Wonder if they think the cost in financial and human terms was/is worth it?

Ian Kimm

Duncan

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