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BMW's all-new 2021 4 Series Coupe is wider, taller, longer, and bolder – Driving

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BMW unveiled the all-new 2021 BMW 4 Series early June, the second generation of its two-door coupe, in a world premiere shown online instead of at a conventional show, due to pandemic restrictions.

The 430i xDrive and M440i xDrive – the “xDrive” designation is for all-wheel-drive – will go on sale in Canada in October, with prices yet to be announced.

A convertible version and top-performance M4 are expected to follow as well.

During the Munich-based presentation, BMW also briefly showed an all-electric version, the i4, but it doesn’t look like Canadian buyers will have a crack at that one, at least not right away.

The 430xi xDrive uses an updated 2.0L turbocharged four-cylinder, making 255 horsepower and 294 lb-ft of torque, an increase of 7 horses and 36 lb-ft over the outgoing generation. BMW claims zero to 100 km/h in 5.6 seconds, with a top speed of 240 km/h.

The M440i xDrive uses a 3.0L turbocharged inline-six and makes 382 hp and 369 lb-ft of torque, an increase of 62 horsepower and 39 lb-ft. Its zero-to-100-km/h sprint happens in 4.5 seconds.

The six-cylinder also includes a new 48-volt mild hybrid system, which grabs its energy from recuperative braking and uses it to add up to 11 horsepower during hard acceleration. It also smoothly restarts the engine after it’s been shut off by the auto start/stop function, which now also shuts it down when the driver is braking for a stop and the car drops below 15 km/h.

Save-the-manual fans are left out; both engines mate to an eight-speed automatic transmission with launch control. The M440i adds a rear M Sport differential for improved traction on acceleration.

Compared to the outgoing 4 Series Coupe, the new one is wider, longer, and taller, with a longer wheelbase and wider front and rear tracks. It shares its wheelbase with its recently-redesigned 3 Series Sedan cousin, but it’s lower and larger.

Other changes include a definitely-polarizing nose with a massive grille, which BMW said “accommodates the greater cooling requirements of the more powerful engines.” The rest of the design is handsome, though, with a sweeping roofline and uncluttered rear styling. The M440i is differentiated by a rear spoiler and grey accents on the grille, front intake, mirrors and exhaust tips.

Inside, the new model retains much of BMW’s customary cabin styling but adds new sport seats and steering wheel, while the M440i adds an M Sport steering wheel and M-branded sill plates.

Along with standard blind-spot monitoring and lane-keeping assist, and the addition of Android Auto alongside Apple CarPlay, the 4 Series offers active cruise control with extended hands-free operation, a self-parking feature, and an adaptive drive mode that uses the navigation system’s map data to anticipate upcoming curves.

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MacBook Pro 13 and MacBook Air with ARM processors to enter mass production in Q4 2020; ARM-powered MacBook Pro 14 and MacBook Pro 16 joining in mid-2021 – Notebookcheck.net

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Alex Alderson, 2020-07-10 (Update: 2020-07-10)

Prior to writing and translating for Notebookcheck, I worked for various companies including Apple and Neowin. I have a BA in International History and Politics from the University of Leeds, which I have since converted to a Law Degree. Happy to chat on Twitter or Notebookchat.

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LinkedIn sued after being caught reading users’ clipboards on iOS 14 – 9to5Mac

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LinkedIn was recently caught reading users’ clipboards on iPhone and iPad thanks to the new privacy features of iOS 14, as we reported last week. Even though the company claimed it was due a software bug, there’s now an iPhone user who’s suing LinkedIn for supposedly reading sensitive content from the clipboard without permission.

According to a Yahoo! Finance report, Adam Bauer filed a lawsuit in the San Francisco federal court arguing that LinkedIn collects personal information from iPhone and iPad users via the system’s clipboard.

Bauer complains that LinkedIn may not only have access to private data from the device on which the app is installed, but also from other nearby devices such as a Mac through Apple’s Universal Clipboard feature.

The class-action lawsuit lawsuit classifies the problem as an alleged violation of the law or social norms under California laws. LinkedIn hasn’t commented on the situation yet, but the company said a few days ago that the iOS app wasn’t intentionally reading the users’ clipboard, but due to a software bug.

iOS 14 and iPadOS 14 includes a new banner alert that lets users know if an app is pasting from the clipboard, which is part of a series of new privacy features Apple is adding to its operating systems this year.

This particular clipboard feature is already exposing the behavior of some popular apps like TikTok, AccuWeather, AliExpress, and now LinkedIn. Even after several reports on the web, this is the first time a user has filed a lawsuit based on the new iOS 14 privacy feature — and the update has been available to a restricted number of users for just two weeks.

We’re yet to know if the court will accept the user’s appeal against LinkedIn.

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Apple Warns Against Closing MacBooks With a Cover Over the Camera – MacRumors

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Apple this month published a support document that warns customers against closing their Mac notebooks with a cover over the camera as it can lead to display damage.

Image via Reddit
Apple says that the clearance between the display and the keyboard is designed to very tight tolerances, which can be problematic. Covering the camera can also cause issues with automatic brightness and True Tone.

If you close your Mac notebook with a camera cover installed, you might damage your display because the clearance between the display and keyboard is designed to very tight tolerances. Covering the built-in camera might also interfere with the ambient light sensor and prevent features like automatic brightness and True Tone from working. As an alternative to a camera cover, use the camera indicator light to determine if your camera is active, and decide which apps can use your camera in System Preferences.

The warnings from Apple likely stem from complaints from MacBook Pro owners who have seen their displays crack after covering the camera, and there are multiple reports and warnings on sites that include MacRumors and Reddit. The issue appears to be especially bad with the new 16-inch ‌MacBook Pro‌ models that have thinner bezels.

Image via the MacRumors Forums
MacRumors forum member Dashwin, for example, put a webcam cover on his 16-inch ‌MacBook Pro‌ in April and the result was a crack in the display under where the camera is located.

The latest MBP 16 inch with the thin tiny bezels and display comes at a cost of breakage with the tiniest of forces with a webcam cover in place. The internal display no longer works and I’ve had to connect it to an external display. I’ve had one of the exact same webcam covers on my 2011 MBP with no issues whatsoever for many years.

Damage from applying a webcam cover to the camera is considered accidental and can be repaired under AppleCare+, but it’s quite possible it’s an issue that Apple won’t fix for customers that don’t have ‌AppleCare‌+, and it’s an expensive fix.

Apple says that customers concerned about illicit camera access should watch for the green light that comes on when the camera is activated. The camera is engineered so that it can’t be accessed without the indicator light turning on.

MacBook owners can also control which apps have access to the built-in camera as users must grant permission for camera use on any operating system after macOS Mojave. For those who do need to cover the camera, Apple recommends a camera cover that’s not thicker than the average piece of printer paper (0.1mm) and that does not leave adhesive residue.

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