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Boeing, NASA to Launch Starliner’s First Crewed Mission in 2021

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Boeing said on Tuesday it aims to redo its unmanned Starliner crew capsule flight test to the International Space Station (ISS) in December or January, depending on when it completes software and test hardware production development.

If the test mission is successful, Boeing and NASA will fly Starliner’s first crewed mission in summer 2021, with a post-certification mission roughly scheduled for the following winter, the company added.

Boeing is eager for another shot at proving its crew capsule after technical failures put the aerospace juggernaut behind Elon Musk’s rocket company SpaceX, which successfully returned its rival crew capsule from the ISS earlier this month.

During Boeing’s first uncrewed test, in December 2019, a series of software glitches and an issue with the spacecraft’s automated timer resulted in Starliner failing to dock at the space station and returning to Earth a week early.

In February, a NASA safety review panel found Boeing had narrowly missed a “catastrophic failure” in the botched test, and recommended examining the company’s software verification process before letting it fly humans to space.

Earlier this month, Boeing watched from the sidelines as SpaceX’s Crew Dragon capsule splashed down in the Gulf of Mexico after a two-month voyage to the International Space Station – NASA’s first crewed mission from home soil in nine years.

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ISS to adjust orbit to avoid unidentified space object, says source – TASS

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MOSCOW, September 23. /TASS/. The orbit of the International Space Station (ISS) will be adjusted in the small hours of Wednesday to avoid collision with an unidentified object, a source in the Mission Control Center told TASS on Tuesday.

“The ISS is expected to approach an unidentified space object at 01:21 Moscow time on September 23. It is planned to perform an avoidance maneuver at 00:19 Moscow time,” the source said.

The source said that according to Russia’s and US’s calculations, the ISS is currently in flying in the so-called red zone and the collision is highly probable. “That is why the avoidance maneuver is necessary,” the source stressed, adding that the nothing is currently knows about the space object, as it is not no the space catalogues.

Russia’s state space corporation Roscosmos earlier planned to adjust the ISS’ orbit to avoid possible collision with the BRICSat-2 US satellite. However, it was decided later that this maneuver was unnecessary.

The current ISS crew comprises NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy and Russian cosmonauts Anatoly Ivanishin and Ivan Vagner.

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The new set of'mini moons' to be captured on Earth could be space junk. – haveeruonline

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Will Earth discover the second mini-moon in 2020? Unlikely to be.

NASA

There’s a huge moon coming over your head, and you can think of it as “this is enough moon.” However, sometimes the Earth becomes greedy and begins to attract small asteroids to stay in orbit longer. Short visits to this “mini moon” are very rare and only 2 have been confirmed so far. The most recent release is the Little Rock CD3 on February 15th, 2020. Discovered by astronomers From the Catalina Sky Survey sponsored by NASA Glorious mini moon As early as 2015, it trapped Earth’s gravity, stayed with us until May 2020, and then jumped back into space.

However, in the unprecedented year of 2020, astronomers announced they had discovered another potential mini-moon, 2020 SO.

Except it doesn’t act like a small asteroid at all. Our mini moon is not the moon. It moves too slowly to become a rock emitted from the body of the universe. So, astronomers think it’s probably just space junk left behind at the beginning of the space race.

Current theory says that the 2020 SO is the rocket body of the Atlas Centaur-D rocket, originally launched in 1966. The rocket was launched on September 20th, carrying the Surveyor 2 lunar lander to the moon. Size and orbit SO in 2020, Published by NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, It seems to be neatly aligned with the Centaur body.

This object will be caught by Earth’s gravity in October and will reach its closest approach on December 1st, reaching within about 31,000 miles. Astronomers need to be able to see objects in detail by evaluating the shape of the object and the kind of light it emits.

If it’s the Centaur stage-if it’s trash-it’s still interesting trash. It has been wandering the solar system for over 50 years. We will be able to learn a little about the effects of the universe on old rocket bodies. And while that will not cause any problems for Earthlings, as far as we can tell, it plays a timely role. Reminders of the space debris problem.

Since the first launch of rockets and satellites into orbit, we have been polluting the space around the Earth. Not everything that goes up comes down immediately. Thousands of space debris, disappeared satellites, and tiny chunks of garbage are circling the Earth at high speed. Collisions with debris can be fatal and can puncture a rocket or satellite. More launches means more junk, and more junk poses a much greater risk to our appetite for space flight, satellites and space occupancy.

You don’t even have to look back for more than 24 hours to see potential problems with space junk. On Tuesday, The International Space Station had to “burn manipulators”. Prevents unknown pieces of space junk from approaching you.

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Tom Cruise gets a flight date for his space movie – Yahoo Canada Sports

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Tom Cruise smiles as he gives an interview during a red carpet event for the movie "Mission: Impossible - Fallout" at the Imperial Ancestral Temple in Beijing, China, Wednesday, Aug. 29, 2018. The film opens in China on Aug. 31. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein)

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Tom Cruise (Credit: AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein)

Tom Cruise will be heading to the heavens to make the first action movie to be shot in space in October, 2021.

An under-the-radar tweet from the Space Shuttle Almanac, which emerged last weekend, appears to confirm that Cruise will be travelling with director Doug Liman on Elon Musk’s SpaceX Crew Dragon capsule.

They will head to the International Space Station with the veteran NASA pilot Michael Lopez-Alegria at the helm.

According to the tweet, which lists the passenger manifest on the flight, there is still a spare seat on the mission.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="NASA confirmed in May this year that Cruise would be heading to space to make a movie with Bourne Identity filmmaker Liman.” data-reactid=”38″>NASA confirmed in May this year that Cruise would be heading to space to make a movie with Bourne Identity filmmaker Liman.

“We need popular media to inspire a new generation of engineers and scientists to make @NASA’s ambitious plans a reality,” said NASA administrator Jim Bridestine.

Little is known about the nature of the movie as yet, though the scale of it likely to be pretty limited in terms of crew.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="However, it is thought that Liman, who has worked with Cruise on movies including Edge of Tomorrow and American Made, has penned a draft screenplay for the project.” data-reactid=”43″>However, it is thought that Liman, who has worked with Cruise on movies including Edge of Tomorrow and American Made, has penned a draft screenplay for the project.

US actor Tom Cruise (C), accompanied by film director Doug Liman (L) and producer Erwin Stoff (R) pose at a press conference for their latest movie "Edge of Tomorrow" in Tokyo on June 27, 2014. The three are here to promote the science fiction film, adapted from the novel "All You Need Is Kill" written by Japanese novelist Hiroshi Sakurazaka. AFP PHOTO / Yoshikazu TSUNO (Photo credit should read YOSHIKAZU TSUNO/AFP via Getty Images)US actor Tom Cruise (C), accompanied by film director Doug Liman (L) and producer Erwin Stoff (R) pose at a press conference for their latest movie "Edge of Tomorrow" in Tokyo on June 27, 2014. The three are here to promote the science fiction film, adapted from the novel "All You Need Is Kill" written by Japanese novelist Hiroshi Sakurazaka. AFP PHOTO / Yoshikazu TSUNO (Photo credit should read YOSHIKAZU TSUNO/AFP via Getty Images)

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Tom Cruise with Doug Liman and producer Erwin Stoff (Credit: YOSHIKAZU TSUNO/AFP via Getty Images)

The Crew Dragon made history on 30 May this year, blasting into space in a partnership between NASA and Musk’s SpaceX, ferrying astronauts to the ISS.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Cruise, meanwhile, is currently back to filming the latest in the Mission: Impossible movie series with Christopher McQuarrie, after the production was curtailed by the coronavirus lockdown back in March.” data-reactid=”65″>Cruise, meanwhile, is currently back to filming the latest in the Mission: Impossible movie series with Christopher McQuarrie, after the production was curtailed by the coronavirus lockdown back in March.

Returning to the action sequel’s set, he filmed a death-defying motorbike stunt in Norway earlier this month, launching from a ramp from the top of a mountain into a valley before parachuting to safety.

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