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Bonhams New York | Asian Art Week in September: Highlights and Schedule | Auctions News – TheValue.com

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Bonhams New York will hold Asian Art Week auctions from 17 to 24 September. These sales are in parallel with Christie’s and Sotheby’s versions.

This international auction house will have seven sales of fine arts – six sales will be live and one sale will be online. Artworks include Chinese paintings and calligraphy, ceramics, snuff bottles, Buddhist sculptures, Japanese and Korean art. 

Some key highlights include a Tibetan gilt copper alloy figure of Sakyamuni Buddha from the 11th to 12 century, an enamel Chinese-subject snuff bottle during the Qianlong period (1736-1795) and Chinese modern painter, Huang Bihong’s artwork from the mid-20th century.

Here is an overview of the sales, together with the highlight lots:

Reverend Richard Fabian Collection of Chinese Paintings and Calligraphy III

Reverend Richard Fabian was the founder and rector of San Francisco’s St. Gregory Nyssen Episcopal Church. He studied Chinese art at Yale University in the 1960s and developed an appreciation for Chinese paintings. Most of the works offered in this sale featured in exhibitions of the Fabian Collection at the Asian Art Museum of San Francisco and the Honolulu Academy of Art. 

Chinese Ceramics, Works of Art and Paintings

250 lots of Chinese ceramics, works of art and paintings will be offered in this sale. Highlights include a Qianlong-period (1736-1795) ‘robin’s-egg’ glazed two-handed vase and a zitan luohan chuang (Chinese wooden ornated bed) from late Qing dynasty (circa 18th century to 1911) / Republic period (1912-1949). 

Manfred Arnold Collection of Chinese Snuff Bottles

Amongst the three major international auction houses, Bonhams has key sales of snuff bottles. The Manfred Arnold Collection features 132 snuff bottles. Arnold purchased one of his first snuff bottles in 1966, along Fifth Avenue in New York City. 

Emily Byrne Curtis Collection of Chinese Snuff Bottles

Curtis has a deep passion for Asian art. She dedicated much time to refine her taste and broadened her understanding through extensive academic research. This sale has 92 artworks, including those made from glass, jade, lacquer and porcelain. 

Japanese and Korean Art, including an Important Collection of Surimono

This is one of the traditional sales during Asian Art Week in New York. There are 350 lots, including Japanese prints called surinomo. Highlights include ukiyo-e (Japanese woodblock prints and paintings) artists such as Kubo Shuman, Katsushika Hokusai, Totoya Hokkei and Yashima Gakutei. 

Indian, Himalayan and Southeast Asian Art

This is another traditional sales during Asian Art Week in New York, with Buddhist sculptures as highlight objects. There are two key objects, including a Tibetan gilt copper alloy figure of Standing Sakyamuni Buddha from 11th-12th century, and a Ming dynasty gilt copper alloy figure of Yamantaka Vajrabhairava and Vajravetali from mid-15th century.  

Arts of India, Southeast Asia and Himalayas Online 

This online sale has a low price range – from US$600 to 6,000 dollars, suitable for new art collectors. It has a wide range of 60 artworks, including sculptures, paintings and pottery. 

Huang Binhong (1865-1955) 

Abstract Landscape | Ink and colour on paper
Created in 1952 
Sale: Reverend Richard Fabian Collection of Chinese Paintings and Calligraphy III 
Estimate: US$50,000 – 80,000  

Zhao Zhiqian (1829-1884)

Calligraphy in Running / Standard Script | Ink on paper, Collection of four hanging scrolls 
Sale: Reverend Richard Fabian Collection of Chinese Paintings and Calligraphy III 
Estimate: US$80,000 – 120,000  

‘Robin’s egg’ glazed archaistic hu-shaped two-handed vase with Qianlong six-character impressed seal mark and of the period 

Created in Qianlong period (1736-1795) 
Sale: Chinese Ceramics, Works of Art and Paintings 
Estimate: US$400,000 – 600,000  

Zitan luohan chuang (bed) 

Created in late Qing dynasty (circa 18th century to 1911) / Republic period (1912-1949)
Sale: Chinese Ceramics, Works of Art and Paintings 
Estimate: US$200,000 – 300,000 

Miniature inside-painted crystal snuff bottle | Signed by Ma Shaoxuan 

Created in 1897
Sale: Chinese Ceramics, Works of Art and Paintings 
Estimate: US$12,000 – 18,000 

Beijing enamel Chinese-subject snuff bottle with Qianlong Mark and of the period 

Created in Qianlong period (1736-1795) 
Sale: Emily Byrne Curtis Collection of Chinese Snuff Bottles 
Estimate: US$70,000 – 90,000 

A Set of 12 Miniature Album Leaves Depicting Scenes from Chapters 11 through 22 of Genji monogatari (The Tale of Genji) 

Created in Momoyama period (1573-1615), circa 1600 
Sale: Japanese and Korean Art, including an Important Collection of Surinomo 
Estimate: US$30,000 – 40,000 

Kubo Shunman (1757-1820)  

Owl on a Flowering Magnolia Branch 
Created in circa 1800 
Sale: Japanese and Korean Art, including an Important Collection of Surinomo 
Estimate: US$6,000 – 8,000 

A gilt copper alloy figure of Standing Sakyamuni Buddha | Central Tibet 

Created in 11th / 12th century 
Sale: Indian, Himalayan and Southeast Asian Art 
Estimate: US$800,000 – 1,200,000 

A gilt copper alloy figure of Yamantaka Vajrabhairava and Vajravetali 

Created in Ming dynasty, mid-15th century 
Sale: Indian, Himalayan and Southeast Asian Art 
Estimate: US$600,000 – 800,000 

Monochrome green glazed stoneware bowl with large carved floral decoration | Vietnam 

Created in Tran-Le dynasties, 14th / 15th century 
Sale: Arts of India, Southeast Asia and the Himalayas Online 
Estimate: US$4,000 – 6,000 

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VIDEO: West Fine Art Show in-person exhibition and fundraiser draws carefully distanced crowds – Aldergrove Star – Aldergrove Star

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Nineteen artists took part in the West Fine Arts fall exhibition and fundraiser for the Langley Hospice Society at the Glass House Estate Winery in Aldergrove held from Friday, Sept. 17, to Sunday, Sept 19. (Dan Ferguson/Langley Advance Times)Nineteen artists took part in the West Fine Arts fall exhibition and fundraiser for the Langley Hospice Society at the Glass House Estate Winery in Aldergrove held from Friday, Sept. 17, to Sunday, Sept 19. (Dan Ferguson/Langley Advance Times)
As he worked on one painting, Richard Brodeur positioned another for visitors to view at the West Fine Arts fall exhibition and fundraiser for the Langley Hospice Society at the Glass House Estate Winery in Aldergrove held from Friday, Sept. 17, to Sunday, Sept 19. (Dan Ferguson/Langley Advance Times)As he worked on one painting, Richard Brodeur positioned another for visitors to view at the West Fine Arts fall exhibition and fundraiser for the Langley Hospice Society at the Glass House Estate Winery in Aldergrove held from Friday, Sept. 17, to Sunday, Sept 19. (Dan Ferguson/Langley Advance Times)
There was a good turnout at the West Fine Arts fall exhibition and fundraiser for the Langley Hospice Society at the Glass House Estate Winery in Aldergrove from Friday, Sept. 17, to Sunday, Sept 19. (Dan Ferguson/Langley Advance Times)There was a good turnout at the West Fine Arts fall exhibition and fundraiser for the Langley Hospice Society at the Glass House Estate Winery in Aldergrove from Friday, Sept. 17, to Sunday, Sept 19. (Dan Ferguson/Langley Advance Times)
Organizer and artist Brian Croft reported a good turnout at the West Fine Arts fall exhibition and fundraiser for the Langley Hospice Society at the Glass House Estate Winery in Aldergrove from Friday, Sept. 17, to Sunday, Sept 19. (Dan Ferguson/Langley Advance Times)Organizer and artist Brian Croft reported a good turnout at the West Fine Arts fall exhibition and fundraiser for the Langley Hospice Society at the Glass House Estate Winery in Aldergrove from Friday, Sept. 17, to Sunday, Sept 19. (Dan Ferguson/Langley Advance Times)
Nineteen artists took part in the West Fine Arts fall exhibition and fundraiser for the Langley Hospice Society at the Glass House Estate Winery in Aldergrove from Friday, Sept. 17, to Sunday, Sept 19. (Dan Ferguson/Langley Advance Times)Nineteen artists took part in the West Fine Arts fall exhibition and fundraiser for the Langley Hospice Society at the Glass House Estate Winery in Aldergrove from Friday, Sept. 17, to Sunday, Sept 19. (Dan Ferguson/Langley Advance Times)

A return to a carefully monitored in-person event by the West Fine Art Show and charitable fundraiser at the Glass House Estate Winery in Aldergrove drew a good turnout, organizer and co-founder, historical landscape painter Brian Croft, said.

“A lot of people buying, a lot of paintings coming off the walls,” is how Croft summarized the three day event that wrapped up Sunday, Sept. 19.

“Sales were good.”

Social distancing and other COVID precautions were being followed, with numbers carefully monitored, Croft told the Langley Advance Times.

Social distancing was maintained at the West Fine Arts fall exhibition and fundraiser for the Langley Hospice Society at the Glass House Estate Winery in Aldergrove held from Friday, Sept. 17, to Sunday, Sept 19. (Dan Ferguson/Langley Advance Times)

Social distancing was maintained at the West Fine Arts fall exhibition and fundraiser for the Langley Hospice Society at the Glass House Estate Winery in Aldergrove held from Friday, Sept. 17, to Sunday, Sept 19. (Dan Ferguson/Langley Advance Times)

“We watch it very closely,” Croft remarked, but they were only forced to delay admission to keep numbers within limits once.

“Just for a few minutes.”

Today, Sunday, was the last day of the exhibition at Glass House, 23449 0 Ave, open from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Artists include Croft, Brent Cooke, Jodie Blaney, John Ferrie, Richard Brodeur, Emily Lozeron, Lorn Curry, Joyce Trygg, Jim Pescott, Ken Nash, Graham McKenzie, Felicity Holmes, Serge Dube, Alison Philpott, Drew Keilback, Judy Vanderveen, Catherine Traynor, Victor Gligor, Patricia Falck and Lizete Dureault.

Music was also provided throughout the weekend by Langley guitarist John Gilliat.

READ ALSO: Artists come together again to benefit Langley hospice

Partial proceeds from the fall event will go to support Langley Hospice Society.

Admission is free, but donations to the charity are welcome.

Last year alone, the September show raised more than $10,000 for the charity, bringing the contributions to date to more than $70,000 for hospice.

One show in early spring (which had to be held virtually this year for the first time) raises money for the Langley School District Foundation, as well as a show held in the mid to later part of May in conjunction with the Cloverdale Rodeo (which was cancelled this year) and typically benefits the CHILD Foundation.

READ ALSO: The West Fine Art Show shifts to an online-only event amid tighter health orders

More photos from the event can be viewed online.

More information about the artists can be found online at www.westart.ca.


Have a story tip? Email: dan.ferguson@langleyadvancetimes.com

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Public art installation in Owen Sound about hope, healing and more – Owen Sound Sun Times

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When Metis artist Tracey-May Chambers began her #hopeandhealingcanada installations earlier this year, her main goal was about reconnecting as Canada and Ontario began to reopen from the pandemic.

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Since then her installations have remained symbols of connectivity, but have also become about creating a dialogue about the difficult subjects of past and present racial discrimination against Indigenous people.

“I sort of lost direction and I wasn’t sure which direction to go after COVID because it was such a weird time for creating. I am a sculptor most of the time but would prefer to do installations because I like to be outside,” the Hamilton artists said Saturday outside the Tom Thomson Art Gallery in Owen Sound where she was installing her latest work. “I was just trying to figure out how to illustrate connection in a tangible way and this is what I came up with.”

But as her works evolved and became more intricate and more complicated, the discussion around the installations also became much more complex, particularly after the discovery of hundreds of unmarked graves of children at former residential schools in the spring and early summer.

“It became something else entirely and questioning whether there was actually any connection between First Nations communities – being Indigenous, Metis and Inuit — or have we always been completely separate,” said Chambers. “I began talking to people about it, which is great. No one knows what to do. No one knows how to move forward from this.”

While the project is about hope and healing Canada, Chambers said the installations have given her the opportunity to specifically talk about the decolonization of Indigenous people with those who may not otherwise have that discussion.

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“Most settlers don’t talk about decolonization because it has always been their life, so they don’t see it. They feel things don’t need to change because everything is OK to them, but clearly it is not,” said Chambers. “Being in the space is an act of decolonization and literally that is what it comes down to for me.”

Chambers installs her works, both indoors and outdoors, sometimes lasting a day and other times up to six months. The installation just west of the Tom Thomson gallery along 2nd Avenue West is to be in place until Oct. 1, and taken down following the National Day for Truth and Reconciliation on Sept. 30.

Metis artist Tracey-Mae Chambers, from Hamilton, installs her #hopeandhealingcanada project in the parkette just to the west of the Tom Thomson Art Gallery in Owen Sound on Saturday, September 18, 2021. Chambers uses red yarn to symbolize connectivity – between each other, ourselves and our communities, and our environment. Chambers is installing works across Canada, each one intended as an act of decolonization, inspiring people to connect, offering the hope that people can find healing and the path towards deeper understanding. The Owen Sound installation will run until Oct. 1.
Metis artist Tracey-Mae Chambers, from Hamilton, installs her #hopeandhealingcanada project in the parkette just to the west of the Tom Thomson Art Gallery in Owen Sound on Saturday, September 18, 2021. Chambers uses red yarn to symbolize connectivity – between each other, ourselves and our communities, and our environment. Chambers is installing works across Canada, each one intended as an act of decolonization, inspiring people to connect, offering the hope that people can find healing and the path towards deeper understanding. The Owen Sound installation will run until Oct. 1. Photo by Rob Gowan The Sun Times

The red yarn that Chambers has used in her pieces, “representing danger and power, but also courage and love,” will be reused again and again as she travels the country constructing the installation. She has plans to do 69 of the works in total.

“It will be used somewhere else across Canada and it will look totally different from this, and that is an act of decolonization because capitalism is a part of colonization,” Chambers said. “Really most people would throw it away and get a new one because it is easier. It made me realize reusing this is an act of decolonization by saying no to capitalism and saying no to that throw-away society, which is not an Indigenous world view.”

Chambers said that while she is sparking some conversations about difficult subjects, much more has to be done.

“I still see this sort of backlash against something like Every Child Matters. How could I feel it is getting anywhere if that organization isn’t getting anywhere,” Chambers said. “But at least I am getting these tiny conversations that are part of a bigger conversation, and that is the best that I can do.

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“The hope is there that the conversations will be there. It is just that some days are harder than others.”

Tom Thomson Art Gallery Curator of Public Projects and Education Heather McLeese said they are doing what they can to break down all barriers, both real and perceived, at the local gallery.

“Public art is a big focus for us, and projects that are talking about decolonization and truth and reconciliation, are not easy conversations at all, but they are necessary,” said McLeese. “That is what we should be doing here at the gallery and the city has been extremely supportive of this whole project.”

More details about Chambers’ installations can be found at https://www.traceymae.com/hopeandhealingcanada.html

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On the Avenue Art Gallery puts spotlight on northern artists during provincial art fair – Prince Albert Daily Herald

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Prince Albert gallery is one of 17 from across the province hosting online and in-person exhibits

Prince Albert’s On the Avenue Art Gallery is one of two new additions to the annual Art Now provincial fine art fair, and curator Jesse Campbell says it’s a great opportunity to showcase northern artists.

On the Avenue is one of 17 galleries showing exhibits during the annual art fair, which runs online until Sept. 26. Residents can also visit the gallery in person from Sept. 24-25 to see 38 pieces from 10 different artists, and go online to view panel discussions and artist talks hosted from around the province.

“It’s really exciting because it’s a great opportunity to work with a huge variety of artists and curators and writers and arts professionals,” Campbell said. “(It’s) not only (artists) from Saskatchewan, but arts professionals who have roots in Saskatchewan, but live further afield. There is a lot of opportunity to, I think, create some interesting experiences with art and look at a variety of topics in art being made on the prairies.”

Galleries across the province will showcase a wide variety of artists, but On the Avenue chose to focus on work from members of the Lac La Ronge Indian Band.

Campbell said art education takes a different form in the north, where families and communities pass techniques down to younger generations instead of universities or art schools. That’s created a unique artistic tradition that’s rarely showcased on the provincial stage.

“I think it really shows the way that a lot of people have lived traditionally in northern Saskatchewan,” Campbell explained. “There’s a lot of work that’s quite descriptive and narrative. It’s not terribly abstract, but you still do get distinct feelings and moods that come across in the work.”

The variety is what stood out most for Campbell. The exhibit showcases everything from paintings and sculptures to traditional Indigenous art forms like birch bark biting. A lot of the materials are traditional too, which exhibitors taking advantage of wood and antlers to create their pieces.

“It’s a really good look into what artists are doing north of us here in PA,” Campbell said. “I hope (viewers) get a little bit of an understanding of what artists in the north are focusing on, the kinds of materials they’re using, and how there’s a lot of tradition being passed down through the artwork.”

Art Now held their opening online reception on Sept. 16, where viewers got a glimpse of the more than 600 works of art on display across the province. In just three days, more than 3,000 visitors have logged on to view the exhibits.

Campbell also helped organize a series of artist talks and panels, which will continue throughout the week. That includes an artist talk with Molly R. Ratt on Sept. 21, which is presented by On the Avenue Art Gallery. Replays of previous talks are available on the SaskGalleries YouTube page.

In-person events are limited to only two days. Campbell said that’s an unfortunate side-effect of COVID-19, but she’s confident the online exhibits will impress art lovers from across the province.

To register for upcoming panels and artist talks, or to view those held previously, visit artnow.ca/online/events.

This is Art Now’s sixth year of operation. It celebrates the variety and quality of original fine art made in Saskatchewan. All shows are free to attend or view.

Upcoming online events for the Art Now Saskatchewan Art Fair

Sunday, Sept. 19

1 p.m. – Panel Session No. 4: Culture C(l)ash: can Indigenous artists make a living without selling out

Tuesday, Sept. 21

1:30 p.m. – Artist Talk: Sandra Knoss

4:30 p.m. – Artist Talk: Molly R. Ratt*

7 p.m. – Panel Session No. 5: Art as Life – the Creative Process

Wednesday, Sept. 22

Noon – Artist Talk: Edie Marshall

3 p.m. – Artist Talk: Shelley Hosaluk

Thursday, Sept. 23

1:30 p.m. – Artist Talk: Maia Stark

3 p.m. – Artist Talk: Michaela Hoppe

Sunday, Sept. 26

Noon – Artist Talk: Dave Gejdos

1:30 p.m. – Artist Talk: Arlette Seib

*Presented by On the Avenue Art Gallery

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