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Businesses warned of credit card, ID fraud – Belleville Intelligencer

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Faced with an increase in complaints about credit card and identification fraud, provincial police are reminding the public to watch out for fraudsters.

The increase began in April, police say, and more businesses are falling prey to scams.

“Typically, the fraudsters contact a business to place an order for a product by way of phone, email or website, with plans to make the payment using a stolen payment card and counterfeit driver’s licences,” police reported in a news release.

Believing it to be a legitimate purchase, workers process the payment on the stolen card, shipping the product via a shipping company or via someone picking up the product by using a rented van or trailer – which was also rented with a stolen card.

“Eventually the real cardholder identifies and disputes the unauthorized charge,” the release reads. “As a result, the business receives a chargeback and is responsible for paying back the amount charged on the stolen card.”

Businesses which accept transactions without a card being present should use the Ministry of Transportation’s online driver’s licence check verification tool.

That service is now free and has been expanded.

“The only information relayed through the service is whether the driver’s licence number entered is valid or invalid along with specific condition codes, if applicable. However, no personal information is displayed,” the release notes.

It can now check as many as 100 licence numbers at once; download licence numbers from a CSV file; e-mail and download results.

It can be used on mobile devices and allow those devices to scan licences.

Fraud victims should contact their local police services and the Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre at 1-888-495-8501 or report online at http://www.antifraudcentre.ca

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Alleged Xiaomi Mi 11 and Mi 11 Pro specifications surface on Weibo – Notebookcheck.net

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Here’s what the Xiaomi Mi 11 and Xiaomi Mi 11 Pro may have in store for us ?(image via Xiaomi)
Some Xiaomi Mi 11 and Mi 11 Pro specifications have shown up online. Both phones are tipped to come with a 1440p screen that refreshes at 120Hz. The Mi 11 Pro will allegedly support fast charging at 120W. Xiaomi is expected to unveil the Mi 11 series by the end of December 2020.

With the Xiaomi Mi 11 series’ launch date drawing closer, the internet is abuzz with speculations about the phone’s specifications. Xiaomi and Qualcomm have already confirmed that it will run the Snapdragon 888, so we know that for sure. However, there seems to be a lot of buzz around the Xiaomi Mi 11 series’ camera and battery prowess. A table showcasing the alleged specifications of the Xiaomi Mi 11 and Mi 11 Pro’s side-by-side has now surfaced on Weibo. It shouldn’t be long before we know if this information is correct. Ice Universe suggests that Xiaomi plans on launching the Mi 11 series at the end of December.

It is unclear as to how many cameras both smartphones will come in total. The base Xiaomi Mi 11 is billed to ship with a 108MP Samsung ISOCELL HM3 sensor assisted by a 13MP ultra-wide-angle lens. Things begin to get murky here, as the machine translation fails to tell us the telephoto lens’ megapixel count. It may also come with a hole-punch 20MP selfie camera. There appears to be a macro lens thrown in the mix, too. More details about it should emerge as time passes. The Xiaomi Mi 11 will reportedly ship with a 4,700mAh battery that can be charged at 50W via a cable, and at 30W wirelessly. Prices are expected to start at RMB 3,999 (US$610) for the base variant with 8GB of LPDDR5 RAM and 128GB of USF 3.1 storage. Other Xiaomi Mi 11 features include an under-display fingerprint scanner, NFC, and a 1440p screen with a refresh rate of 120Hz.

Moving on to the better-specced Xiaomi Mi 11 Pro (or Mi 11 Ultra according to some sources), we get what appears to be a 50MP primary sensor. However, an earlier report told us that the 50MP image is a result of 4:1 pixel billing, so we’re likely looking at a 200MP sensor. It will be assisted by a 48MP ultra-wide-angle lens and a 48MP telephoto lens. Xiaomi could very well follow Huawei’s path and throw in a second telephoto lens for good measure. Even the Galaxy S21 Ultra is billed to feature a similar setup, giving Xiaomi additional incentive to follow suit. Things get even more impressive when we look at the Xiaomi Mi 11 Pro’s battery specifications. It will allegedly support fast charging at 120W over a cable and 80W wirelessly. Xiaomi has been working on its 100W fast charging tech for quite some time now, and it’s good to see it make its way in a flagship smartphone. The Xiaomi Mi 11 Pro is expected to cost RMB 5,299 (US$807) for the same memory and storage configuration as the non-Pro variant. Information about the exact screen size is scant, but it stands to reason that the smartphone will come with a 1440p 120Hz AMOLED screen.

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Xiaomi Mi 11, Mi 11 Pro specifications and images leaked – gizmochina

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Xiaomi is expected to launch the Xiaomi Mi 11 series later this month. The lineup reportedly includes two handsets named the Mi 11 and Mi 11 Pro. Fresh leaks have surfaced on Weibo to reveal the specs of the two phones. Also, a couple of images have also surface to showcase the rear camera design of the Mi 11 duo. Before reading ahead, readers are advised to digest this report with a grain of salt since these leaks are not from regular leakers.

Xiaomi Mi 11 and Mi 11 Pro specifications (Unconfirmed)

The leak reveals that the Mi 11 and Mi 11 Pro will be equipped with S-AMOLED panels that offer a 120Hz refresh rate and quad HD+ resolution. The exact screen size is not mentioned in the leak. Both phones are said to be equipped with 20-megapixel front-facing cameras.

The Mi 11 could be backed by a battery of around 4,780mAh capacity and it may come with support for 50W wired charging and 30W wireless charging. The Mi 11 Pro could be coming with a smaller battery of around 4,500mAh capacity. It may support 120W wired charging and 80W wireless charging.

The leak states that Mi 11 may feature a 108-megapixel + 13-megapixel (ultrawide) + 5-megapixel (macro) triple camera setup. The Mi 11 Pro could be equipped with a 48-megapixel (OmniVision OV48C) + 20-megapixel (ultrawide) + 12-megapixel (telephoto with 2x optical zoom) triple camera setup.

The Snapdragon 888 will fuel the device with LPPDR5 RAM and UFS 3.1 storage. For security, these phones have an under-display fingerprint scanner and 2D face unlock. The other features that are available on Mi 11 duo include dual speakers, x-axis linear motor, IR blaster, and NFC. The leak states that the Mi 11 with 8 GB RAM + 128 GB storage may cost 3,999 Yuan (~$610) to 4,499 Yuan (~$686). The Pro model with the same RAM and storage may cost 5,299 Yuan (~$808) to 5,499 Yuan (~$838).

Tipster Digital Chat Station hinted today that the Mi 11 series will have a horizontal camera array. Shown above are some images that reveal that the Mi 11 duo will have a square-shaped camera module.

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Amazon is replacing PS5 consoles that might have been stolen in transit – BGR – BGR

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  • Some consumers who bought a PS5 from Amazon received a random item instead.
  • Amazon refunded the purchases and offered vouchers, but customers who thought that they were getting consoles were irate and wanted to know when they could buy a PS5.
  • Amazon is now emailing customers to offer them a replacement for the PS5 order.

As if securing a PlayStation 5 hasn’t been difficult enough, in a cruel twist of fate, some consumers who thought that they were actually able to complete their orders on or before launch day ended up receiving a random item from their seller instead. As IGN reported late last month, Amazon customers in the United Kingdom were getting a wide variety of products in the mail instead of the next-generation consoles that they ordered, from cat litter and George Foreman grills to bed sheets and lamps. It’s unclear why this happened, but Amazon appears to be on the case.

A few days after the publication of freelance journalist Bex April May’s exhaustive investigation surrounding the PS5 orders, some UK customers that were sent the wrong item began receiving emails from Amazon alerting them that a new PS5 had been obtained and would be shipped their way within the next two weeks.


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“We are pleased to confirm that we will be able to secure a PlayStation 5 for you as a replacement for the order that you didn’t receive,” said the email from Amazon, which was forwarded to IGN by May. “Subject to valid payment, we expect to dispatch your PlayStation 5 within 14 days of your confirmation.”

Amazon has yet to offer an official explanation for the botched orders. As such, theories began to spring up, some of which May discusses in her piece for IGN. Shortly after receiving her package, May posted a video on Twitter of what was meant to be a PS5 unboxing, but instead turned into an air fryer unboxing:

After the video went up, someone responded, noting that Amazon doesn’t use clear tape on its packages. If you have received a package from Amazon recently, you know that they all use black Prime-branded tape. Other shoppers said that they encountered the same clear tape on their packages. Had someone tampered with their Amazon boxes? Had they removed the PS5 consoles and replaced them with different items? There are few products harder to get a hold of right now than a PS5, and with the resale market on fire, it certainly seems plausible.

That said, there are a number of safeguards that would make it very difficult, if not impossible, for someone working at an Amazon warehouse or delivering packages to swap out an order. There’s a good chance that we will never find out what happened, but at least Amazon is attempting to do right by its customers.

Jacob started covering video games and technology in college as a hobby, but it quickly became clear to him that this was what he wanted to do for a living. He currently resides in New York writing for BGR. His previously published work can be found on TechHive, VentureBeat and Game Rant.

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