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California man who sold $1M of forged art gets 3-year term – Rocky Mountain Outlook

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SAN DIEGO (AP) — A Southern California man who sold $1.1 million in forged art was sentenced Friday to three years in federal prison, prosecutors said.

Jason Harrington, 38, of Escondido, was sentenced in San Diego after pleading guilty to wire fraud earlier this year, according to the U.S. attorney’s office for the Southern District of California.

Harrington sold forgeries of paintings he claimed were the work of noted conceptual and street artist Richard Hambleton, who was a colleague of Jean-Michel Basquiat and Keith Haring.

Hambleton, a Canadian who settled in New York City, died in 2017. Some of his works have sold for hundreds of thousands of dollars.

Harrington acknowledged that between 2018 and 2020, he sold forgeries to at least 15 people and galleries, including some depicting Hambleton’s famous black-silhouetted “Shadowman” theme from the early 1980s, prosecutors said.

“To make the forged art appear authentic, Harrington lied to prospective buyers regarding the provenance of the art,” including providing them with fake letters of authenticity from supposed owners, the U.S. attorney’s office said in a statement.

“This is a fitting sentence for a defendant who harmed investors, corrupted the integrity of the art market, and damaged the historical-cultural record,” Acting U.S. Attorney Randy Grossman said in the statement.

Harrington agreed to make $1.1 million in restitution and faces a restitution hearing in February.

The Associated Press

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Cornwall Hive's Art 4 All event hopes to grow – Standard Freeholder

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It might have been virtual, but the first ever Art 4 All still yielded some good results on Saturday.

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The event, organized by the Cornwall Art Hive, aimed at getting the local artistic community together to discuss the craft, create connections and of course, create. Initially, it was to be hosted at the Cornwall Square mall, but health and safety restrictions meant that it had to take place over Zoom.

Despite a smaller turnout that anticipated, Richard Salem, executive director of Your Arts Council of Cornwall and the SDG Counties (YAC), is hopeful that future Art 4 All events can be held in person.

“We felt that rather than not have anything that this would be better than nothing,” he said. “We are trying to keep the events as consistent as possible. We want to have one every month and hopefully by next month, the third Saturday, at Cornwall Square, we will have an event in person.”

In all, three local artists too part in the event — Salem, Yafa Goawily, and Liv Bigtree.

“Right now I have work showing at the Brooklyn collective which is a gallery space in North Carolina,” said Bigtree, 19. “Right now, I’m not really doing much, art-wise. I’ve been taking it easy, taking a little break.

“I like to do that when I’m not really working on big projects, I just come back to this space where I just have fun.”

  1. The Your Arts Council of Cornwall and SDG unveiled a new logo in collaboration with the Cornwall Art Hive at its general meeting on Tuesday, June 22, 2021 over Zoom. Handout/Cornwall Standard-Freeholder/Postmedia Network

    Your Arts Council struggled in pandemic, but excited for the year ahead

  2. The old Bank of Montreal building on Pitt Street on Friday July 6, 2018 in Cornwall, Ont. The building will soon become Cornwall's new arts centre.
Lois Ann Baker/Cornwall Standard-Freeholder/Postmedia Network

    YAC interested in running Cornwall’s arts centre

Goawily, which produces a wide range of visual arts, said creating art has always been relieving. She also explained that although the pandemic has created some issues for artists, it has had the effect of growing the local art movement.

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“We are growing not just with events and support, we are growing because we can reach different people – that is our main goal,” she said. “The community knows now that we are open for them.”

“Art is so important not just for artists but for everyone,” said Bigtree. “You don’t have to have specific skills. I really think that everyone is an artist. I think that it’s part of what makes us humans.

“Art is about freedom and that is what art hive is trying to create.”

Even with the pandemic, the Cornwall Art Hive and YAC still managed to host well-attended events in the summer, in Lamoureux Park. According to Salem, the happenings attracted residents from all walks of life and grew fast in popularity.

“Of course that it’s sad (pandemic restrictions), but I think that we learned to support each other more,” said Goawily. “I was new to Cornwall and did my first solo exhibition here. I find that yes, we are tiny but we are mighty. We are growing fast and we support each other truly.”

“We started buying art from each other and we had some groups going sharing what we had accomplished. We are stronger together.”

Anyone interested in gaining insight on the local art community can do so through a variety of videos uploaded to the Your Arts Council Youtube channel .

Fracine@postmedia.com

twitter.com/FrancisRacine

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The LA Art Show Returns With an Environmental Focus – Surface Magazine

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Environmental issues have taken on a particular urgency in the past year. Climate scientists have warned that if nations fail to immediately pivot from fossil fuels, catastrophic consequences await. Artists frequently reckon with this grim reality, with many expressing skepticism—if not outright anger—at climate inaction, which has resulted in the destruction of coral reefs, intense wildfires, rising sea levels, and the extinction of beloved animal species. The issues surrounding climate change have become top of mind for The LA Art Show, which is kicking off the city’s eagerly anticipated 2022 art season with a newfound ecological lens thanks to the return of DIVERSEartLA.

This year’s edition, which kicks off today at the Los Angeles Convention Center, sheds light not only on how artists represent the environment in their work, but how humanity’s role factors into the equation. “DIVERSEartLA 2022 will encourage visitors to confront the complex challenges of our global climate crisis and imagine potential solutions,” says Marisa Caichiolo, the show’s curator, who encouraged participating art museums to partner with science and environmental institutions. “This topic is at the heart of a growing number of art narratives, including exhibitions built with high-tech innovations designed to inspire artistic appreciation and the desire to respond to environmental challenges, reinforcing the value of translating environmental advocacy into art.” 

Among the programming highlights is “Our turn to change,” a worry-inducing video installation by Andrea Juan and Gabriel Penedo Diego and presented by the Museum of Nature of Cantabria Spain that awakens viewers to melting polar ice caps that are causing sea levels to rise drop by drop. The Torrance Art Museum, meanwhile, presents “Memorial to the Future,” a collaborative piece curated by Max Presneill that centers Brutalist architecture as a failed model of idealism while highlighting the immediate need for environmental action. And in “The Earth’s Fruits” by Guillermo Anselmo Vezzosi, waste unexpectedly takes on a dignified second life. 

The LA Art Show opens at the Los Angeles Convention Center, South Hall, from Jan. 19–23. 

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300-pound local art heist took 4 minutes | News | pentictonherald.ca – pentictonherald.ca

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300-pound local art heist took 4 minutes | News | pentictonherald.ca  pentictonherald.ca



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