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Canada adds 1,085 new coronavirus cases as Trudeau warns of second wave – Global News

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Canada added 1,085 new cases of the novel coronavirus on Wednesday, marking the fifth day in a row the country has seen a daily increase of more than 1,000.

The new infections bring the country’s total case count to 147,612.

Health authorities also said 10 more people have died after contracting the virus.

Read more:
Canada ‘on the brink’ of coronavirus surge, second wave underway in some regions: Trudeau

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Since the pandemic began, the virus has claimed 9,244 lives in Canada.

The new cases come as Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said some regions in Canada are already experiencing a second wave of the virus.

“In our four biggest provinces, the second wave isn’t just starting, it’s already underway,” he said.

Trudeau made the comments during a rare evening address.

He urged Canadians to continue abiding by the public health measures including sticking to social bubbles, wearing a mask, washing hands frequently and continuing practicing social distancing.

“Together, we have the power to get this second wave under control,” he said.






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Woman waits for 7 hours to get coronavirus test at Toronto hospital


Woman waits for 7 hours to get coronavirus test at Toronto hospital

The prime minister said it is “likely” Canadians will not be able to gather for Thanksgiving, but said “we still have a shot at Christmas.”

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Ontario reported 335 new cases of the virus on Wednesday, and health officials there said three more people had died.

The new infections bring the province’s total caseload to 48,087.

Since the pandemic began Ontario has tested 3,649,980 people for COVID-19, and 41,600 have recovered after falling ill. 

In Quebec, 471 new infections were detected, and health officials said one more person had died.

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Health authorities said three more deaths which occurred between Sept. 16 and Sept. 21, bring the provincial death toll to 5,809.

Read more:
New study finds 247 people brought COVID-19 to Quebec from abroad during March break 2020

However, 59,686 people have recovered from the virus in Quebec, and health officials have conducted 2,136,088 tests to date. 

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New Brunswick added one new case of COVID-19 on Wednesday, but officials said no one else had died.

The province has seen two deaths related to the virus so far.

A total of 191 people have recovered after contracting the respiratory illness, and 71,585 tests have been administered in New Brunswick.

Nova Scotia health officials said no new cases or deaths associated with COVID-19 had occurred.

So far 1,021 people have recovered after testing positive for the novel coronavirus, and 90,124 people have been tested.

Prince Edward Island saw one new case of COVID-19, marking the province’s first new infection since Sept. 16.

The new case brings Prince Edward Island’s total caseload to 58, however, 57 of those people have recovered. 

Provincial health authorities have administered 33,196 tests for the virus. 

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Coronavirus: Researchers identify the origins of COVID-19 infections in Quebec


Coronavirus: Researchers identify the origins of COVID-19 infections in Quebec

No new cases of COVID-19 were detected in Newfoundland on Wednesday, and provincial health authorities said the death toll remained at three.

Newfoundland has not recorded a new case of the virus since Sept. 18.

So far, 268 people have recovered from COVID-19 in the province, and 38,960 tests have been conducted. 

Forty-two new infections were reported in Manitoba, and health authorities said one more person had died after testing positive for the virus.

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To date, 1,238 people have recovered from COVID-19 in the province, and 170,045 people have been tested. 

Saskatchewan reported six new cases, but health officials said the death toll in the province remained at 24.

Thus far, 176,912 people have been tested for COVID-19 and 1,673 have recovered after becoming ill.

Read more:
40 people had a BBQ at an Ottawa park. Days later 105 people are quarantined for coronavirus

Alberta recorded 143 new infections, bringing the province’s total case count to 17,032.

Health officials there said two more people had died, pushing Alberta’s death toll to 260.

However, since the pandemic began, 15,252 people have recovered from the virus. 

A total of 1,242,263 people have been tested for COVID-19 in Alberta.

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Further west in British Columbia, 86 new infections were reported, but no new deaths have occurred.

Health authorities also reported five epidemiologically-linked, meaning they have not been confirmed by a laboratory.

So far, 6,769 people who contracted COVID-19 have recovered in B.C., and 483,979 tests have been administered. 

No new cases in the territories

None of Canada’s territories reported a new case of COVID-19 on Wednesday, and health officials confirmed no one else had died.

In the Northwest Territories, all five confirmed cases of the virus are considered resolved.

The territory has administered 1,673 tests for COVID-19.






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Throne speech: Payette touts coronavirus job creation, wage subsidy extension


Throne speech: Payette touts coronavirus job creation, wage subsidy extension

Meanwhile, Nunavut has seen three cases of the virus to date, however, each have been tied to workers from other parts of the country.

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The territory says the infections will be counted in the totals for the workers’ home jurisdictions, meaning Nunavut still considers itself free of COVID-19 cases.

The territory has tested 2,812 for the virus to date. 

All 15 confirmed cases of the virus in the Yukon are considered to be recovered.

Since the pandemic began, health officials have administered 59,686 tests. 

Global cases approach 32 million

COVID-19 was first detected in Wuhan, China late last year. Since then, it has infected a total of 31,759,233 people around the world, according to a tally from John’s Hopkins University.

As of 7 p.m. ET on Wednesday, the virus had claimed 973,904 lives worldwide.

Read more:
Coronavirus took their lives. Here’s how their families will remember them

The United States remained the epicentre of the virus on Wednesday, with over 6.9 million confirmed cases.

So far 201,861 Americans have died after contracting COVID-19.

© 2020 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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Federal government to announce new immigration targets today – CBC.ca

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Immigration Minister Marco Mendicino will unveil a three-year immigration plan today that will set targets for bringing skilled workers, family members and refugees into Canada in the midst of a global pandemic.

Last year’s plan promised to bring in more than one million immigrants over a three-year period, but the COVID-19 crisis and the resulting travel restrictions have slowed down the process. Mendicino said the government remains committed to welcoming newcomers as a way to keep Canada’s economy afloat.

“We believe strongly in building Canada through immigration. Immigration is helping us get through the pandemic, and will be the key to both our short-term economic recovery and long-term prosperity,” he said in a press statement to CBC News. 

“That’s exactly why we need to continue with measured, responsible growth to drive Canada’s success into the future.”

Minister of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Marco Mendicino, second from top right, leads participants as they raise their hands to swear the oath to become Canadian citizens during a virtual citizenship ceremony on Canada Day 2020. (Justin Tang/The Canadian Press)

The immigration level plan is expected to be tabled in the House of Commons at about noon ET, and Mendicino is scheduled to hold a news conference in Ottawa at 12:30 p.m. ET.

Traditionally, Ottawa’s goal in immigration policy has been to attract top talent in a competitive global market while reuniting families and offering refuge to people displaced by disaster, conflict and persecution.

In its last three-year plan, the federal government sought to bring in 341,000 immigrants this year, 351,000 next year and another 361,000 in 2022.

Focus on labour gaps, says C of C

Leah Nord, senior director of workforce strategies and inclusive growth for the Canadian Chamber of Commerce, said the world has changed a great deal since those targets were set. However the government chooses to set its immigration targets in today’s new policy, she said, it will have to focus squarely on matching economic migrants to worker shortages in various sectors and regions of the country.

Despite changes in the labour market and a major spike in the unemployment rate since the onset of the pandemic, gaps in the market remain, Nord said — and immigration will continue to play a large role in filling persistent labour shortages.

“We’re in this rather strange situation where we do have higher unemployment rates than we’ve seen for a number of years. Before the crisis there were record low unemployment rates. Now, they’re tipping towards the other end,” she said.

“But we still have a situation where there are still job vacancies and jobs that need to be filled across the country. Immigration can play an important role in diversity and economic growth, but also in filling labour market gaps, for sure.”

The government’s Advisory Council on Economic Growth recommended that Canada boost its annual immigration levels to 450,000 by 2021 to stimulate the economy and tackle the twin labour market problems of an aging population and a low birth rate.

Conservative immigration critic Raquel Dancho said that whatever the Trudeau government announces today, it must have a concrete plan for bringing people safely into the country during a pandemic and for integrating them into Canadian society.

She said the backlog of applicants has grown during the pandemic.

Conservative immigration critic Raquel Dancho says the federal government has to prepare both for bringing new people to Canada in the middle of a pandemic and for integrating them into Canadian society once they’re here. (Justin Tang/The Canadian Press)

“The immigration system has not been well-managed, I think to say the least, in the last eight months. So I will be looking for some sort of plan for how they’re going to improve it,” Dancho said.

“The number can be whatever it’s going to be, but unless they bring forward a plan for how they’re going to change course and get better at processing immigration applications, it’s really all for nothing.”

Dancho said Canadians must have a clear explanation of how immigration targets will meet Canada’s labour needs while upholding its humanitarian commitments.

NDP immigration critic Jenny Kwan urged the government to increase its capacity to help vulnerable people in need of protection in Canada, noting that persecution abroad has not stopped during the pandemic.

She said Canada also should give permanent residence status to people who want it and are already in the country, such as temporary foreign workers and international students with job offers.

“Canada can, in fact, take a true humanitarian approach by regularizing all those immigrants and refugees and undocumented people,” she said.

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Sales of cancer-fighting drugs soared in Canada over the past decade – CBC.ca

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Sales of medications to treat cancer have nearly tripled in Canada over the past decade, reaching $3.9 billion last year, a report by a federal agency says.

The Patented Medicine Prices Review Board has released data showing cancer medications account for about 15 per cent of all spending on pharmaceuticals.

“In 2019, medicines with 28-day treatment costs exceeding $7,500 made up 43 per cent of private plan oncology drug costs, compared with 17 per cent in 2010,” says the report by the board, which aims to protect consumers by ensuring manufacturers aren’t charging excessive prices for patented medications.

It says growth in the Canadian oncology market last year exceeded that of other countries including the United States and Switzerland, with a 20 per cent increase over sales from 2018.

Sales of oral cancer medications account for half of all oncology sales in Canada, up from 37 per cent in 2010, the report says, adding that while intravenous chemotherapy is publicly funded in all provinces, reimbursement of oral drugs differs across the country.

Steve Morgan, a professor in the School of Population and Public Health at the University of British Columbia, said it doesn’t make sense to cover the cost of intravenous chemotherapy in hospitals and not medications prescribed to patients outside of those facilities, but that’s justified in a country without a national drug plan.

“This is one of the messy bits of the Canadian health care system,” he said, adding there’s a patchwork system of coverage across jurisdictions, with cancer agencies in some provinces providing limited payment for at-home oncology treatments.

Clouded pricing

A national pharmacare plan would allow Canada to negotiate better drug prices, Morgan said, noting it’s the only country in the world with a universal health care system without coverage for prescription drugs.

Much of the national-level negotiating countries do with manufacturers happens in secret, Morgan said. The negotiations start with a list or sticker price — much like buying a vehicle at a dealership — as part of a complicated regime involving rebates to bring down prices.

“It’s deliberately made to cloud the real transaction price, the real price to health the system, so that no country can look at it and say, ‘Hey, wait a second, I heard that the people in Australia got this amazing new price on this drug,'” Morgan said.

A pharmacist serves a customer from behind protective screens in Nice, France, in May. Canada’s list prices for prescription drugs are among the highest in the world. (Valery Hache/AFP via Getty Images)

“What we can’t know is exactly which countries are getting the most value for money because we don’t get to see their secret deals. We do know that Canada’s list prices are among the highest in the world, and even above the level that the (Patented Medicine Prices Review Board) would like to see in terms of just the beginning of negotiations.

Countries with universal single-payer systems for medications — including Norway, Sweden, the United Kingdom, Australia and New Zealand — are likely using their negotiating power to get better prices from manufacturers asking for unreasonable amounts of money, he said.

Canada is expected to have about 225,000 new cancer cases and 83,000 deaths from the disease this year alone, the report by the Patented Medicine Prices Review Board says.

Provinces negotiate with manufacturers individually and should not “cave” to requests for unreasonable prices, Morgan said.

“They cannot, in essence, have patients being used as hostages.”

Prescription drug affordability

Results of an online survey released Thursday by the Angus Reid Institute (ARI) say 26 per cent of Canadians had to pay for at least half their prescription drug costs over the past year. That figure rises to 37 per cent for households earning less than $50,000 annually.

“Regionally, the highest rates of self-payment for prescriptions are found in British Columbia, Saskatchewan, and Manitoba,” said the survey. “In all three of these provinces, one in three households reported paying half of their prescription drug costs or more. By contrast, Ontario and Alberta report the highest rates of insurance and government coverage.”

The survey was conducted in partnership with the University of B.C.’s School of Population and Public Health, St. Michael’s Hospital in Toronto, the University of Toronto, Carleton University’s Faculty of Public Affairs and School of Public Policy and Administration in Ottawa and Women’s College Hospital, Toronto.

It was done between Oct. 13 and 18 included a representative randomized sample of 1,936 Canadians who are members of the Angus Reid Forum. For comparison purposes only, a probability sample of this size would carry a margin of error of +/- 2.2 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

The survey was self-commissioned and paid for by ARI.

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Meng Wanzhou scores victory as lawyers allowed to argue U.S. tried to trick Canada – CBC.ca

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Meng Wanzhou scored a victory in her battle to fight extradition Thursday as the judge overseeing the proceedings agreed to let the Huawei executive’s lawyers pursue their claim that the United States misled Canada about the basics of the case.

In a ruling posted online, Associate Chief Justice Heather Holmes said there was an “air of reality to Ms. Meng’s allegations of abuse of process in relation to the requesting state’s conduct.”

At a hearing held last month, the chief financial officer’s lawyers said they believed the evidence was strong enough to prove that the United States omitted key components of the case that undermine allegations of fraud against their client.

Holmes’ ruling means Meng’s lawyers will be able to include those claims as one of three lines of attack in February, when they try to convince the judge that the entire case should be thrown out for abuse of process.

In her ruling, Holmes noted that staying the proceedings against Meng was a possibility if the defence can make its case, but that she might also consider a less drastic remedy, like cutting out parts of the Crown’s record deemed unreliable.

Judge rules new evidence allowed

Meng is charged with fraud and conspiracy in the United States in relation to allegations that she lied to HSBC about Huawei’s relationship with a hidden subsidiary that was accused of violating U.S. economic sanctions against Iran.

Prosecutors claim that by lying to HSBC to continue a financial relationship, Meng placed the bank at risk of loss and prosecution for breaching the same sanctions.

The U.S. claims Meng Wanzhou lied to an HSBC banker in a PowerPoint about Huawei’s relationship with a subsidiary accused of violating U.S. sanctions against Iran. (Chan Long Hei/Bloomberg)

As part of the extradition process, the United States provided a record of the case that includes slides from the PowerPoint presentation Meng gave an HSBC executive in Hong Kong in August 2013.

But Meng’s lawyers claim the U.S. deliberately omitted two slides from the PowerPoint that showed Meng didn’t mislead the bank.

And they also claim that where the U.S. said only “junior” employees knew about the real relationship between Huawei and its subsidiary, senior executives at the bank were also aware.

In her ruling, Holmes said she would allow two statements from the missing slides to be included as evidence in the extradition case. She also agreed to allow evidence about HSBC’s management structure to help determine who is junior and who is not.

Rights violation issue not raised, CBSA agent testifies

Holmes released her decision even as Meng’s lawyers were in court gathering evidence related to the second line of argument that there was an abuse of process: the claim that her rights were violated at the time of her arrest.

Meng was questioned by Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) officers for three hours before she was arrested on Dec. 1, 2018, after her arrival at Vancouver’s airport on a flight from Hong Kong.

A still from a video of Meng Wanzhou first few hours in CBSA custody. The defence claims her rights were violated during that time. (B.C. Supreme Court)

The defence team claims the CBSA and RCMP conspired with the U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation to mount a covert criminal investigation into Meng by using the border agency’s extraordinary powers to question her without a lawyer.

The CBSA agent who seized Meng’s phones was on the stand Thursday for his second day of testimony.

Border services officer Scott Kirkland testified that he believed there were grounds to question Meng about the possibility she might be involved in espionage. 

During his testimony Wednesday, Kirkland said that was because the CBSA’s internal system has flagged her for “national security” reasons, but he admitted in cross-examination Thursday that this might not have been the case. Meng’s lawyer suggested that she was only targeted because of the criminal charges.

Kirkland also said he thought the RCMP should have arrested Meng immediately, before the CBSA carried out its inquiries, because he worried about the impact of a delay on her right to obtain legal counsel.

Kirkland said he knew the high profile case would end up in court.

But he said he didn’t raise the issue of possible Charter of Rights and Freedoms violations out loud. And no one else among the RCMP and CBSA officers who were present said the word “Charter.”

Two weeks have been set aside in February 2021 for arguments about the record of the case and the alleged violation of Meng’s rights at the time of her arrest.

The third defence claim relates to allegations that U.S. President Donald Trump has politicized the case by threatening to use Meng as a bargaining chip to get a better deal with China.

Holmes noted in her ruling that if any one of those lines of argument were proven, they might not be enough in and of themselves to derail the case, but the cumulative effect of all of them might end in a stay. 

Meng has denied the allegations against her. 

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