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Canada adds 2787 new cases, breaking previous day’s record

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Coronavirus cases rose by 2,787 in Canada on Thursday, breaking the daily record last set the day before, while deaths rose by 33.

The increases put Canada’s national case total at 208,933 and deaths at 9,862.

Quebec reported 1,033 cases Thursday, bringing its total to 97,231. There are currently 553 hospitalized in the province, down by 12 from yesterday, with 101 of them in ICU, up by seven from the day before.

The province also reported 20 deaths, eight of which occurred in the last 24 hours. The virus has killed 6,094 people in the province to date.

Ontario reported 841 new cases Thursday, the second-highest case increase recorded so far, bringing the province’s total to 67,527.

There are now 6,390 active cases in the province with 270 people hospitalized, 74 in the intensive care unit and 48 in ICUs on a ventilator.

Nine deaths were also reported to bring the death toll to 3,071 in the province.

Out west, British Columbia announced 274 new cases, breaking the previous record of 203 from the day earlier for most new cases in the province.

The province now has 1,920 active cases with 71 hospitalizations, 24 of which are in intensive care.

Officials said many of the new cases were the result of social gatherings, such as weddings and funerals, and some due to “large” Thanksgiving gatherings.

No new deaths were reported, keeping B.C.’s toll at 256.

Meanwhile, Alberta reported 406 new cases, breaking the 400-mark for the first time in the pandemic. There are now 3,519 active cases.

No new deaths were reported.

Saskatchewan reported 60 new cases Thursday to bring its total to 2,558, with 509 active cases and 21 people currently in hospital, three of whom are in ICU.

No new deaths were reported to add to the province’s 25.

Manitoba announced the province’s deadliest day of the pandemic, with four new deaths to add to the 47 total, the vast majority of which have happened in the last few weeks.

The province added 147 new cases, with 42 hospitalizations and eight in intensive care — its highest rate of hospitalizations to date in the pandemic.

In the Atlantic bubble, Nova Scotia announced no new cases to add to its four active cases with no hospitalizations. The province has seen 1,097 cases total and 65 deaths.

New Brunswick, though, reported three new cases Thursday to bring its total to 322, with 81 active cases and five hospitalizations, one of which is in ICU. No new deaths were added to its total of four.

Newfoundland and Labrador also added one new case to bring its total to 288, and no new deaths.

No new cases or deaths were reported for PEI or any of the territories.

The coronavirus has infected 41,561,983 people wordwide to date and has killed 1,135,289, according to Johns Hopkins University.

— With files from Global News staff

 

 

Source:- Global News

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It’s ‘unknown’ when Canada will reach herd immunity from coronavirus vaccine: Tam – Global News

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The percentage of the Canadian population that needs to be vaccinated in order to reach widespread immunity against the coronavirus is unknown, according to Canada’s chief public health officer Dr. Theresa Tam.

Speaking at a media conference Friday, Tam was asked what entails a “successful vaccine campaign,” in order to determine when the population reaches herd immunity.

READ MORE: Canada is nowhere near herd immunity to the novel coronavirus as second wave surges, Tam says

“Nobody actually knows the level of vaccine coverage to achieve community immunity or herd immunity,” Tam explained. “We have an assumption that you will probably need 60 to 70 per cent of people to be vaccinated. But we don’t know that for sure … that’s modelling. Lots of these calculations are being done but bottom line is that we actually don’t know.”

The end goal, Tam added, is to vaccinate as many Canadian as quickly as possible.

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According to the World Health Organization (WHO), herd immunity is when a population can be protected from a certain virus, like COVID-19, if a threshold of vaccination is reached. It’s achieved by protecting people from a virus, not by exposing them to it, the WHO added.

[ Sign up for our Health IQ newsletter for the latest coronavirus updates ]

However, the percentage of people needed to be vaccinated in order to create herd immunity depends on the disease.

For example, herd immunity against measles requires about 95 per cent of a population to be vaccinated and for polio, the threshold is about 80 per cent, the WHO stated.


Click to play video 'Canada is nowhere near herd immunity to the coronavirus as second wave surges: Tam'



8:56
Canada is nowhere near herd immunity to the coronavirus as second wave surges: Tam


Canada is nowhere near herd immunity to the coronavirus as second wave surges: Tam – Nov 1, 2020

Tam previously told Global News in November that Canada is still nowhere near herd immunity with the coronavirus.

“We’re only at a few percentage points in terms of the immunity in our population. That leaves over 90 per cent of the population, or 95 per cent of the population still vulnerable,” Tam said.

Story continues below advertisement

Read more:
Two shots. A waiting period. Why the coronavirus vaccine won’t be a quick fix

Canada is currently battling a severe second wave of COVID-19 cases. Officials are urging people to remain vigilant in stopping the spread of the virus, despite the promising vaccine news.

Canada expects the first doses of the COVID-19 vaccine to be administered in January, which will go to the country’s most vulnerable populations.

Last week Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said he hopes to see the “majority” of Canadians vaccinated by September, though he did not specify exactly what that means as far as a percentage of the population.

© 2020 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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It’s ‘unknown’ when Canada will reach herd immunity from coronavirus vaccine: Tam – Global News

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 on


The percentage of the Canadian population that needs to be vaccinated in order to reach widespread immunity against the coronavirus is unknown, according to Canada’s chief public health officer Dr. Theresa Tam.

Speaking at a media conference Friday, Tam was asked what entails a “successful vaccine campaign,” in order to determine when the population reaches herd immunity.

READ MORE: Canada is nowhere near herd immunity to the novel coronavirus as second wave surges, Tam says

“Nobody actually knows the level of vaccine coverage to achieve community immunity or herd immunity,” Tam explained. “We have an assumption that you will probably need 60 to 70 per cent of people to be vaccinated. But we don’t know that for sure … that’s modelling. Lots of these calculations are being done but bottom line is that we actually don’t know.”

The end goal, Tam added, is to vaccinate as many Canadian as quickly as possible.

Story continues below advertisement

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), herd immunity is when a population can be protected from a certain virus, like COVID-19, if a threshold of vaccination is reached. It’s achieved by protecting people from a virus, not by exposing them to it, the WHO added.

[ Sign up for our Health IQ newsletter for the latest coronavirus updates ]

However, the percentage of people needed to be vaccinated in order to create herd immunity depends on the disease.

For example, herd immunity against measles requires about 95 per cent of a population to be vaccinated and for polio, the threshold is about 80 per cent, the WHO stated.


Click to play video 'Canada is nowhere near herd immunity to the coronavirus as second wave surges: Tam'



8:56
Canada is nowhere near herd immunity to the coronavirus as second wave surges: Tam


Canada is nowhere near herd immunity to the coronavirus as second wave surges: Tam – Nov 1, 2020

Tam previously told Global News in November that Canada is still nowhere near herd immunity with the coronavirus.

“We’re only at a few percentage points in terms of the immunity in our population. That leaves over 90 per cent of the population, or 95 per cent of the population still vulnerable,” Tam said.

Story continues below advertisement

Read more:
Two shots. A waiting period. Why the coronavirus vaccine won’t be a quick fix

Canada is currently battling a severe second wave of COVID-19 cases. Officials are urging people to remain vigilant in stopping the spread of the virus, despite the promising vaccine news.

Canada expects the first doses of the COVID-19 vaccine to be administered in January, which will go to the country’s most vulnerable populations.

Last week Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said he hopes to see the “majority” of Canadians vaccinated by September, though he did not specify exactly what that means as far as a percentage of the population.

© 2020 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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Canada surpasses 400000 total COVID-19 cases

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OTTAWA —
Canada has now recorded more than 400,000 cases of COVID-19 since the beginning of the global pandemic.

Today’s bleak marker came after Saskatchewan reported 283 new cases of the virus today, bringing the national tally to 400,030.

The speed at which Canada reached the 400,000 mark is the latest sign of the accelerating pace of the pandemic across the country.

Canada recorded its 300,000th case of COVID-19 18 days ago on Nov. 16.

It took six months for Canada to record its first 100,000 cases of COVID-19, four months to reach the 200,000 threshold and less than a month to arrive at 300,000.

Canada’s national death toll from the virus currently stands at 12,470.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Dec. 4, 2020.

Source:- CTV News

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