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Canada ‘desperately’ needs people to dig in, stay home in coronavirus fight: Qualtrough – Global News

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As coronavirus cases continue to spike rapidly across the country, the federal government is “desperately” urging people to dig in and stay home.

In an interview with The West Block‘s Mercedes Stephenson, Employment Minister Carla Qualtrough said a broader economic shutdown like what happened earlier in the year is not inevitable, but that Canadians must act now to slow the spread of the virus in families and communities.


Click to play video 'Coronavirus: Canada now at 160,535 total confirmed cases of COVID-19, 9,319 deaths'



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Coronavirus: Canada now at 160,535 total confirmed cases of COVID-19, 9,319 deaths


Coronavirus: Canada now at 160,535 total confirmed cases of COVID-19, 9,319 deaths

“We are right back at the place where we desperately need Canadians to dig in,” she said.

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“As people start going indoors, as the flu season also descends upon us, we have to make sure we’re doing everything we possibly can to continue to address it through the things we all do. Whether it’s hand washing, social distancing, wearing a mask — just staying put as much as we can.

“The more we can do those things, the less economic consequences there will be.”

Read more:
Ottawa’s health system is in ‘crisis,’ Dr. Etches says amid 142 new coronavirus cases

Cases are spiking across the country, including in the two most populous provinces where rapidly-increasing infections last week prompted provincial health officials to impose some restrictions on gatherings, though falling short of mounting calls for a broad order to close indoor bars and dining.

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Ontario reported 732 cases on Friday, a record single-day high, while Quebec topped 1,000 new cases that same day, also a record high.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has said the country is in the second wave and officials like Ottawa’s chief public health officer Dr. Vera Etches are warning the city is reaching a “crisis” point.

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And with many hospitals and testing centres at or nearing capacity, the risk that Canadian health-care systems could become overwhelmed this fall is growing even as provincial officials shy away from the kind of large-scale lockdowns implemented in the spring.

Read more:
Ontario announces provincewide mask policy, new restrictions for ‘hotspot areas’

Qualtrough said the focus is on trying to get people to stop the spread locally first and that provinces will try a range of targeted tactics to try to contain the spread, but want to see results.

“We’re really trying as governments to minimize the economic impact going forward but it really depends on people remaining vigilant. We’re not messing around here.”

The rising case counts come as global deaths have now hit more than one million.

In Canada, confirmed cases now exceed 162,195 while deaths stand at 9,404.

Read more:
Quebec warns more coronavirus restrictions possible as new cases top 1,000

Political leaders also have not been spared: Conservative Leader Erin O’Toole and his wife, Rebecca, both contracted the virus last month, as did Bloc Quebecois Leader Yves-Francois Blanchet.

All three are now recovered, but U.S. President Donald Trump is the latest political leader to fall ill.

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Conservative Deputy Leader Candice Bergen said the infections drive home the seriousness of the virus.

I think it just really makes it real for everyone that this virus is serious. It’s hitting people regardless of who you are, where you live, what your job is,” she said.

“So we all have to be very serious about how we deal with it and how we protect ourselves and those that we love.”

Qualtrough offered similar thoughts.

“Wear your mask, wash your hands, social distance,” she said. “This thing is serious.”


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Coronavirus: Toronto’s top doctor asks province to take further action to stop spread of virus


Coronavirus: Toronto’s top doctor asks province to take further action to stop spread of virus

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UPS executive granted special ministerial exemption from Canada's COVID-19 quarantine – CBC.ca

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The president of U.S. operations for global shipping giant UPS was granted a special ministerial exemption from Canada’s mandatory 14-day COVID-19 quarantine, a CBC News investigation has learned, which he used to lobby Ontario employees to accept the company’s new contract offer.

Nando Cesarone travelled from Atlanta to Toronto for three days of meetings starting Oct. 19.

The company says Cesarone sought and received an authorization for a conditional exemption from mandatory quarantine from Global Affairs Canada.

It’s a decision that the Teamsters, the union representing UPS workers in Canada, finds mystifying.

“We don’t understand why Mr. Cesarone was allowed to come into Canada and why the government waived his 14-day quarantine requirement,” said Christopher Monette, public affairs director for Teamsters Canada.

“We believe the government needs to explain itself on that one. It’s absolutely crucial.”

Foreign Affairs Minister François-Philippe Champagne has granted 191 such quarantine exemptions on “business mobility” grounds since the pandemic began — 138 of them over the past six weeks, a spokesperson said. Permission to skip the self-isolation requirement is given only under “exceptional circumstances,” the department said, and applicants must “thoroughly justify the immediacy of their purpose of travel to Canada.”

Global Affairs refused to discuss Cesarone’s exemption, citing the federal Privacy Act. 

Cesarone declined interview requests, and UPS did not respond to written questions about the exact reasons for his trip or why the meetings couldn’t be conducted remotely. 

Nando Cesarone, president of U.S. operations for UPS, travelled from Atlanta to Toronto in October and spent three days meeting with Canadian employees. The company says he sought and received an authorization for a conditional exemption from mandatory quarantine from Global Affairs Canada. (Charles Platiau/Reuters)

But in a statement to CBC News, the company noted that UPS is an essential service, responsible for delivering needed supplies to Canadian businesses and consumers — including personal protective equipment and “hopefully vaccines soon.” 

Cesarone observed “every regulatory and safety protocol” and followed a detailed COVID-19 “risk mitigation plan,” which included wearing a mask, physical distancing and testing, while in the country, the company said.

However, two employees who met with Cesarone dispute the company’s characterization of the trip and his health precautions, telling CBC News that the meetings “were 100 per cent about labour” and that on at least one occasion, the UPS executive removed his mask so that he could be better heard in a crowded room. The employees asked not to be identified for fear of repercussions.

Visit raises issues of transparency, safety: union

Teamsters Canada says that Cesarone’s visit, which included stops at facilities in Toronto and Mississauga, Ont., raises issues of transparency on the part of the company and the federal government, as well as concerns about workplace safety.

“What’s important for us is that everybody is just playing by the same set of pandemic rules,” Monette said. “Just out of respect for the health, the safety of UPS drivers and UPS workers in general — who are, at the end of the day, essential front-line workers.”

Voting on the new labour agreement at UPS began on Oct. 22, and the results are expected to be released on Nov. 2.

Trucks at the Peace Bridge, between Fort Erie, Ont., and Buffalo, N.Y., in September. The Canada-U.S. border has been closed to non-essential travellers since March 21. But 3.5 million people — essential workers such as truckers and health-care providers — have been excused from quarantine. (Jeffrey T. Barnes/The Associated Press)

Officially, Canada’s border has been closed to non-essential travellers since March 21. But according to the Public Health Agency of Canada, more than 4.6 million people have entered the country over the past seven months. Some 1.1 million, mostly Canadian citizens returning from abroad, were obliged to self-isolate for 14 days. The other 3.5 million — essential workers such as truckers, technicians and health-care providers — were excused from quarantine. 

Over the past month, CBC News has uncovered two instances where senior U.S. executives flew into the country on private jets and were granted exemptions by front-line Canada Border Services Agency officers for non-essential meetings and facility tours — cases that Ottawa now calls errors.

But the growing number of special ministerial exemptions has opposition politicians again wondering why Canada’s supposedly closed border appears so porous at a time when COVID-19 cases are spiking around the globe.

Opposition parties question need for visits

Conservative Leader Erin O’Toole raised the issue in question period in the House of Commons on Tuesday.

“Last month we learned the Liberal government allowed two different American billionaires to enter Canada, and they waived the quarantine rules,” O’Toole said, going on to ask if there is “one set of rules for the rich friends of this government and one set of rules for everyone else?”

WATCH | Federal party leaders spar over COVID-19 quarantine exemptions:

During question period in the House of Commons, Opposition leader Erin O’Toole grilled Prime Minister Justin Trudeau about quarantine exemptions for business executives as reported by CBC News. 1:24

Jack Harris, the MP for St. John’s East and the NDP’s public safety critic, questions why it was necessary for Cesarone to travel to Canada at all.

“You know, we conduct parliament by Zoom. We do meetings though Zoom…. I don’t see the necessity to have some special exemption like this”, Harris said.

“I can’t go to Ottawa and come back to St. John’s, Newfoundland, without a [provincial] 14-day exemption. We have workers from Newfoundland doing the same thing, coming back to work and having to have a 14-day quarantine here.”

Harris is calling on the Liberal government to share more details about which foreign visitors are being granted exemptions from quarantine and why.

“This idea of behind-closed-doors, non-transparent ministerial exemptions, where you have to dig around to find out why it’s happening, that’s not fair to Canadians,” he said. “And I don’t think Canadians would accept that as fair and reasonable.”  

The federal government has recently begun to relax border restrictions and grant entries on compassionate grounds, allowing more foreign citizens and Canadians who live abroad to reunite with romantic partners or visit sick or dying relatives. 

As of Tuesday, Health Canada had received 2,250 such applications and exempted 1,335 people from all, or part, of the 14-day quarantine for what the government decided were compelling personal reasons. Another 630 people were allowed into the country, but forced to self-isolate for the full two weeks.   

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Family members of PS752 victims report receiving threats for speaking out against Iranian regime – CBC.ca

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Canadians who lost loved ones when Iran shot down Flight PS752 earlier this year have been reporting an increasing number of threats warning them against criticizing Iran’s response to the disaster.

“These are ugly, insidious crimes, apparently orchestrated at the behest of a foreign power. That is something that would be disturbing to every Canadian,” said former MP Ralph Goodale who is acting as Canada’s special adviser to the government on the incident.

Goodale says two cases of intimidation and harassment were reported to police in the spring. The number of such incidents of which authorities are aware has now increased to 11, he said. RCMP, local police and security organizations are working with Canada’s allies around the world and taking the threats seriously, Goodale added.

Hamed Esmaeilion lost his nine-year-old daughter Reera and wife Parisa when PS752 was shot down by the Iranian military over Tehran on Jan. 8, killing all 176 people aboard. He’s the spokesperson representing an association of victims’ families in Canada seeking justice and he said he has been receiving hateful messages for months.

‘Let’s talk about the last moments of your wife and daughter’

But the situation escalated after a rally he held on Parliament Hill on Oct. 5, he said.

A suspicious vehicle loitered outside his house that night, pulling up in front of his driveway and then backing up, Esmaeilion said. He also reported receiving a suspicious phone call on Oct. 5 from someone who left a message saying, “Let’s talk about the last moments of your wife and daughter.”

Esmailion said he blocked the number but received a threat in Farsi through his Instagram account later the same day: “Your name is on a list of terror, so enjoy your life before you get killed. And you would be a lesson for out of country traitors.”

Esmailion said he met with RCMP on Friday and was told to keep a record of further calls.

“It doesn’t scare me, honestly,” he told CBC. “This is something we have been through since the beginning and especially in the month of May and June … That was, I think, the peak of insulting and hateful messages that I received.”

He said he believes the messages are coming both from Iran and Canada but he has no idea whether they’re from representatives of the Iranian regime or just from its supporters.

Mahmoud Zibaie, who also lost his wife and daughter when PS752 was shot down, told CBC News that he received a call from someone identifying themselves as the chief investigator of the military court in Iran dealing with the lawsuit for compensation launched against the regime.

Mahmoud Zibaie’s wife Shahrzad Hashemi, left and daughter Maya Zibaie, both perished on flight PS752. (Submitted)

Zibaie said the caller told him that he needed to return to Iran to participate in the suit for compensation. He said the compensation is low down on the list of what he wants from Iran.

“In some sense, I can say that I can regard it as a threat because he … kept telling me that, ‘Okay, we have to see each other. You have to get back to Iran. You have to come here and you have to launch a lawsuit,'” he said.

Zibaie said he plans to share the audio of that call with the RCMP.

Javad Soleimani of Edmonton lost his wife on the flight. He said he is not taking the threats seriously because he has no family left in Iran but worries about those with family back home who could be targets for harassment or persecution.

“These threats and families harassment, actually, have been something ongoing from the very beginning,” Soleimani told CBC News. “From hijacking the funeral routine, writing congratulations on your martyrdom on the coffins, and also … detaining some family members in Iran.”

Javad Soleimani and his wife, Elnaz Nabiyi, who was killed when Iran shot down flight PS752. (Submitted photo)

“It’s I think it’s a national threat to Canada,” he said. “I think the only way to deal with these intimidation or threats or concerns for families is that the Canadian government more publicly support families of victims.”

Goodale said the federal government is taking the threat very seriously.

“It is an offence against Canada, It is a crime under the Criminal Code, and foreign interference attacks the very sovereignty and integrity of our country. So it is indeed treated with gravity it deserves,” he said.

The RCMP issued a statement today saying that it is “aware of allegations of intimidation of the grieving families of the PS752 and we take such complaints seriously.”

“While we cannot comment on individual cases, Canadians and all individuals living in Canada, regardless of their nationality, should feel safe and free from criminal activity,” said the statement.

Watch: Families of Flight 752 victims report threats from Iran:

Loved ones of Canadians and permanent residents who died in the crash of Ukrainian Airlines Flight PS752, say they’ve received a growing number of threats believed to be from Iran and inside Canada. 2:04

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Canada expecting uptick in excess deaths amid COVID-19: StatCan – CTV News

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OTTAWA —
Canada is expecting to see an increase in excess deaths as COVID-19 cases are once again trending upwards, according to Statistics Canada.

Between March and June 2020, as COVID-19 spread across the country, Canada saw over 7,000 excess deaths. That figure refers to deaths that exceed the number that would normally be expected during any given period of time.

While these excess deaths skyrocketed in the early months of the pandemic, there was a brief dip in July, when these figures returned to a normal, pre-pandemic range, which according to Statistics Canada falls around 21,000 deaths per month.

Meanwhile, there were over 170 COVID-19 deaths in August and September respectively — but by the time the first 10 days of October were over, Canada had already reported 244 deaths.

That means there were more COVID-19 deaths reported in those 10 days than were reported in the months of August or September.

“Overall, if the similarities between public health surveillance figures and official death data persist through the resurgence of cases, Canada will likely experience an increase in excess deaths in October,” the publication on the Statistics Canada website explains.

Statistics Canada says that these figures can be an important indicator of both the “direct and indirect effects” of the COVID-19 pandemic.

“While the direct effects include deaths attributable to COVID-19, the indirect effects relate to measures put in place to address the pandemic,” the agency wrote.

“These measures could cause increases or decreases in mortality, such as missed or delayed medical interventions, fewer traffic-related incidents, and other possible changes in behaviour such as increased substance use.”

In its publication, Statistics Canada said it based its findings on “an updated provisional dataset from the Canadian Vital Statistics Death Database” as well as the Public Health Agency of Canada’s COVID-19 Outbreak Update.

It gave the caveat that this data only includes deaths that provinces and territories have reported to Statistics Canada, meaning reporting delays could impact the figures. The data also doesn’t include Yukon. However, Statistics Canada said they adjusted to account for incomplete data “where possible.”

The agency asserted that the figures “provide an important benchmark for understanding the potential impacts of the resurgence of the COVID-19 pandemic on communities across Canada.”

Excess deaths by province

The charts below plot the number of deaths reported by provinces on a weekly basis from the beginning of January until the end of September. The data is provisional, and because of reporting delays, do not reflect all the deaths that occurred during the reference period. Ontario, for example, shows a steep drop in deaths during the summer months of 2020, but that may be partly due to delays in reporting.

Years before 2019 are represented by faint grey lines behind the chart. Numbers have not been adjusted for populations growing year over year.

 

 

2020

 

 

2019

 

 

past years

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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