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Canada not at the point of declaring a federal emergency over COVID-19: Trudeau – Global News

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Prime Minister Justin Trudeau says Canada is not at the point where the federal government needs to take emergency measures to force people to stay at home during the COVID-19 outbreak.

Trudeau says that provinces and local governments continue to take steps to restrict people’s movements and the federal government stepping in is a last resort.






1:23
Coronavirus outbreak: Trudeau thanks kids for doing their part during the COVID-19 crisis


Coronavirus outbreak: Trudeau thanks kids for doing their part during the COVID-19 crisis

“There are many things that are being done and can be done at the local level, at the municipal level and at the provincial level. The federal Emergencies Act is a significant step that can and should be taken when we’ve exhausted all other steps,” Trudeau said at a news conference Sunday.


READ MORE:
Trudeau says House of Commons to reconvene Tuesday to pass COVID-19 legislation

“We continue to work very closely with provinces, with other jurisdictions, to make sure that they are able to do the things that need to be done and we will continue to look at if it is necessary to move forward with the Emergencies Act.”

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Nova Scotia became the latest province Sunday to declare a provincial state of emergency, joining several others including British Columbia, Alberta and Ontario. The Northwest Territories closed its boundaries Saturday to travellers from other parts of Canada.






3:27
Coronavirus outbreak: Health minister sends a stern message to everyone not following public health advice


Coronavirus outbreak: Health minister sends a stern message to everyone not following public health advice

Gatherings in Nova Scotia are now to be no more than five people.

Premier Stephen McNeil said residents are blatantly ignoring the need for social distancing.


READ MORE:
Live updates on the coronavirus pandemic in Canada

“Hundreds gathering on our beaches and in our parks, large groups of people congregating, young people playing street hockey, cars parked everywhere, people disregarding law enforcement,” McNeil said.

“We are dealing with a deadly virus and this behaviour is unacceptable.”






1:49
Coronavirus outbreak: House leader outlines plan for return of MPs to House of Commons to pass COVID-19 legislation


Coronavirus outbreak: House leader outlines plan for return of MPs to House of Commons to pass COVID-19 legislation

Police in Nova Scotia are being given the power to enforce social distancing with $1,000 fines for individuals and $7,500 fines for businesses.

“Our provincial parks are closed. If you go there you are trespassing and your vehicles will be towed,” McNeil said.

“You can get groceries, you can go to the pharmacy, but do not do it in packs. Identify a single family member who can do those errands.”

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READ MORE: Canada working with commercial airlines to repatriate stranded citizens

In Ottawa, federal Health Minister Patty Hajdu said people need to get the message about staying home or the federal government will step in.

“Asking them and recommending them and I am hoping that we don’t have to get to ordering them,” she said when asked what her message to Canadians is.

Nearly 1,400 cases of COVID-19 have been reported in Canada and 19 people have died. Worldwide there have been more than 300,000 cases.






1:01
Coronavirus outbreak: Trudeau says Emergencies Act still on the table


Coronavirus outbreak: Trudeau says Emergencies Act still on the table

It was officially announced Sunday that the House of Commons will reconvene Tuesday to vote on measures to ease the financial burden the outbreak is posing on Canadians and their businesses.

The House will reconvene for four and a half hours to approve the emergency legislation put forward by the federal government.

There will be 32 MPs in the chamber which will be proportional to the representation of each party, said Government House Leader Pablo Rodriguez.

“We are all working together in the best interest of Canadians,” Rodriguez said.

© 2020 The Canadian Press

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COVID response offers chance to shift direction of Canadian economy: experts – CTV News

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The end of the COVID-19 pandemic may be a long way off, but analysts are already looking ahead to how Canada could hasten its recovery and position itself for a low-carbon economy.

“The main thing we need to be doing right now is protecting Canadians’ health and well-being,” said Josha MacNab of the Pembina Institute.

“Within that context, we’re starting to turn our minds to what does economic recovery look like.”

Downturns like the one being caused by the global pandemic routinely reduce carbon dioxide emissions. In the past, they’ve always recovered as economies rebuild.

This time, many are asking how the economy can be restored without greenhouse gases tagging along. Open letters on the issue have already been signed by hundreds of thousands of Canadians, from academics to church groups.

Groups such as the World Resources Institute in the United States are calling for clean energy tax credits, programs to increase the energy efficiency of public buildings and a switch from diesel to electric transit buses. It notes similar measures after the 2009 crash saw 900,000 jobs supported.

Pembina has its own list: funding and training for jobs more resilient to market swings, incentives for switching to electricity, support for industries that produce lower-carbon goods.

“We see this as a once-in-a-generation opportunity to make a down payment on a resilient economy and a healthier future,” MacNab said.

Once the immediate crisis has passed, the Canadian Institute for Climate Choices wants any upcoming stimulus package to focus on making the country more resilient to climate-related shocks such as wildfires or floods.

“These are what we perceived as (remote) risks in the past,” said the group’s economist, Dave Sawyer. “Suddenly, they’re happening all the time.”

The long-term response to COVID-19 could be a chance to do things the Canadian economy will have to do anyway, he said, such as retrain workers from high-carbon industries.

“We know that some industries under this low-carbon future will shed workers,” Sawyer said.

“Where do these workers go? There has been a growing trend to think about transitions for workers.”

Not everyone thinks a post-pandemic green stimulus is appropriate.

“Maybe, to some extent,” said Mark Jaccard, an energy economist at Simon Fraser University.

He suggests the need for relief is going to be so great that governments will at first simply try to restore normalcy.

“Governments are going to pour the money in, short-term, to where workers are already skilled and to regions where they’re already working,” he said. “So it’s going to be in to fossil fuel-endowed areas.”

The real challenge, Jaccard said, will be to not let COVID-19 derail policies already planned or in place.

“It isn’t government spending that will lead to a decarbonized economy. It’s policies.”

Groups such as the Canadian Taxpayers’ Federation and the federal Conservatives have already called for the planned increase in the federal carbon tax to be delayed. The increase, to $30 per tonne, has gone ahead.

Still, Keith Stewart of Greenpeace said that once the immediate dangers of the novel coronavirus have passed, the upset it will leave behind is a chance for a reset.

“It’s a shock to the system that makes things that once seemed natural and inevitable seem unnatural and avoidable.”

Stewart said any money that does go to companies must be accompanied by promises of change — much as car manufacturers promised fuel efficiency improvements in accepting their 2009 bailout.

Once initial needs of public health and well-being are funded, government spending should have an eye to the future, said Stewart.

“That investment could entrench existing systems or it could be an investment in the clean-energy economy.”

This report by The Canadian Press was first published April 5, 2020.

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Canada’s coronavirus response can shift economy’s direction to low-carbon: experts – Global News

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The end of the COVID-19 pandemic may be a long way off, but analysts are already looking ahead to how Canada could hasten its recovery and position itself for a low-carbon economy.

“The main thing we need to be doing right now is protecting Canadians’ health and well-being,” said Josha MacNab of the Pembina Institute.

“Within that context, we’re starting to turn our minds to what does economic recovery look like.”


READ MORE:
Global stocks drift higher after China’s economy shows signs of rebound

Downturns like the one being caused by the global pandemic routinely reduce carbon dioxide emissions. In the past, they’ve always recovered as economies rebuild.

This time, many are asking how the economy can be restored without greenhouse gases tagging along. Open letters on the issue have already been signed by hundreds of thousands of Canadians, from academics to church groups.

Story continues below advertisement

Groups such as the World Resources Institute in the United States are calling for clean energy tax credits, programs to increase the energy efficiency of public buildings and a switch from diesel to electric transit buses. It notes similar measures after the 2009 crash saw 900,000 jobs supported.

Pembina has its own list: funding and training for jobs more resilient to market swings, incentives for switching to electricity, support for industries that produce lower-carbon goods.






2:20
Coronavirus outbreak: Trudeau says Canada working with G20 nations to contain COVID-19


Coronavirus outbreak: Trudeau says Canada working with G20 nations to contain COVID-19

“We see this as a once-in-a-generation opportunity to make a down payment on a resilient economy and a healthier future,” MacNab said.

[ Sign up for our Health IQ newsletter for the latest coronavirus updates ]

Once the immediate crisis has passed, the Canadian Institute for Climate Choices wants any upcoming stimulus package to focus on making the country more resilient to climate-related shocks such as wildfires or floods.

“These are what we perceived as (remote) risks in the past,” said the group’s economist, Dave Sawyer. “Suddenly, they’re happening all the time.”

The long-term response to COVID-19 could be a chance to do things the Canadian economy will have to do anyway, he said, such as retrain workers from high-carbon industries.

“We know that some industries under this low-carbon future will shed workers,” Sawyer said.


READ MORE:
Canada’s carbon tax increasing April 1 despite coronavirus economic crunch

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“Where do these workers go? There has been a growing trend to think about transitions for workers.”

Not everyone thinks a post-pandemic green stimulus is appropriate.

“Maybe, to some extent,” said Mark Jaccard, an energy economist at Simon Fraser University.

He suggests the need for relief is going to be so great that governments will at first simply try to restore normalcy.






2:24
Coronavirus outbreak: Finance Minister says Canada is coordinating with international counterparts to protect the economy


Coronavirus outbreak: Finance Minister says Canada is coordinating with international counterparts to protect the economy

“Governments are going to pour the money in, short-term, to where workers are already skilled and to regions where they’re already working,” he said. “So it’s going to be in to fossil fuel-endowed areas.”

The real challenge, Jaccard said, will be to not let COVID-19 derail policies already planned or in place.

“It isn’t government spending that will lead to a decarbonized economy. It’s policies.”

Groups such as the Canadian Taxpayers’ Federation and the federal Conservatives have already called for the planned increase in the federal carbon tax to be delayed. The increase, to $30 per tonne, has gone ahead.


READ MORE:
Farmers frustrated with federal decision to move forward with carbon tax increase amid pandemic

Still, Keith Stewart of Greenpeace said that once the immediate dangers of the novel coronavirus have passed, the upset it will leave behind is a chance for a reset.

Story continues below advertisement

“It’s a shock to the system that makes things that once seemed natural and inevitable seem unnatural and avoidable.”

Stewart said any money that does go to companies must be accompanied by promises of change _ much as car manufacturers promised fuel efficiency improvements in accepting their 2009 bailout.

Once initial needs of public health and well-being are funded, government spending should have an eye to the future, said Stewart.

“That investment could entrench existing systems or it could be an investment in the clean-energy economy.”

© 2020 The Canadian Press

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Canada to recruit volunteers, offer jobs to reservists amid COVID-19: Trudeau – Global News

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Canada has put a call out for volunteers to support frontline healthcare workers and is offering full-time jobs to Canadian Forces reservists, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau announced during an update to the country’s coronavirus response on Sunday.

“For those of you with specialized skills looking to help our frontline workers, we do want to hear from you,” said Trudeau, who spoke to reporters from Rideau Cottage where he is self-isolating.

According to the prime minister, Health Canada will be building “an inventory of specialized work volunteers” that provinces and territories can draw on, and that some of the work may include tracking COVID-19 cases and tracing contacts.


READ MORE:
Coronavirus: Canada to receive ‘millions’ of masks from China, Trudeau says

Trudeau also said that reservists in the Canadian Armed Forces would also be offered full-time jobs over the coming months, with the same pay and benefits as regular enlisted members.

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“Bolstering the military’s ranks will help offset some of the economic consequences of COVID-19 and ensure that our communities are well-supported,” Trudeau said.

[ Sign up for our Health IQ newsletter for the latest coronavirus updates ]

Volunteer applications will be open until at least April 24, while reservists across the country are going to be contacted directly by the Canadian government.

On Saturday, Trudeau announced “millions” of medical masks would be arriving in Canada from China within 48 hours.

Ottawa is expecting between seven and eight million surgical masks. included in that order are supplies for hard-hit Quebec.

Canada has also leased a warehouse in China to collect and distribute additional supplies “as quickly as possible,” he said.

According to Trudeau, officials are working “day and night” to secure additional, desperately needed personal protective equipment (PPE) for frontline workers.

And, while Canada continues to source the PPE from international suppliers, Trudeau said the government is also working with domestic manufacturers.






2:17
Trudeau won’t retaliate over Trump’s order to ban N95 mask exports to Canada


Trudeau won’t retaliate over Trump’s order to ban N95 mask exports to Canada

The prime minister’s comments came a day after U.S. President Donald Trump asked Minnesota-based company 3M to stop exporting N95 masks to Canada.

Asked about the move, Trudeau said the dialogue was ongoing with U.S. officials, and that he planned to speak with Trump.

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“We are continuing to engage in constructive discussions with different levels within the administration to highlight that the U.S. will be hurting itself as much as Canada will be hurting if we see an interruption of essential goods and services flow back and forth across the border,” he said. “We continue to demonstrate that this is a good thing for both of our countries and we look to continue to ensure that essential supplies get across the border.”

Trudeau said, though, that Canada was not planning any retaliatory measures against the U.S.


READ MORE:
Canada not looking to retaliate after U.S. restricts coronavirus mask exports: Trudeau

According to the Public Health Agency of Canada, by 5 p.m. ET on Saturday, more than 13,800 cases of COVID-19 had been confirmed in Canada.

Speaking at a press conference on Saturday, Canada’s chief medical officer, Dr. Theresa Tam said currently Canada’s healthcare system is not overwhelmed by serious cases of COVID-19, but cautioned that the situation could change at any time.

Tam urged Canadians to continue practising physical distancing, and to heed the advice of medical authorities.

© 2020 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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