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Canada's COVID-19 cases: Largest single-day spike after jurisdictions report 2,558 new patients – Yahoo News Canada

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On Friday, Oct. 9, jurisdictions around Canada reported 2,558 new cases of COVID-19, along with 31 fatalities and 2,016 recently recovered patients.

Alberta and Quebec combined to withdraw three deaths from previous dates. However, the nationwide updates have increased Canada’s active case count by 514, leaving 19,008 currently infected patients around the country.

The 2,558 new cases that were announced on Friday marks the largest single-day spike Canada has recorded throughout the pandemic. It surpasses the 2,437 cases that were announced on Thursday.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="The latest modelling data was presented Friday by Canada’s Chief Public Health Officer Dr. Theresa Tam. If people don’t start to limit their contacts, we could be seeing up to 5,000 cases a day by late October to early November.” data-reactid=”19″>The latest modelling data was presented Friday by Canada’s Chief Public Health Officer Dr. Theresa Tam. If people don’t start to limit their contacts, we could be seeing up to 5,000 cases a day by late October to early November.

“We’re at a tipping point in this pandemic,” said Prime Minister Justin Trudeau on Friday morning while reflecting on the rise in cases nationwide.

Ontario started the day reporting a record-high 939 new COVID-19 patients. The update is part of a worrisome trend that has been developing in Canada’s most populous province, which has led to Premier Doug Ford announcing new restrictions for its three hotspots.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="In New Brunswick, the first school related case has been identified in the Campbellton region, forcing a temporary closure of the high school. Due to a recent spike in cases in the Campbellton and Moncton regions, health officials have imposed new restrictions for those areas.” data-reactid=”22″>In New Brunswick, the first school related case has been identified in the Campbellton region, forcing a temporary closure of the high school. Due to a recent spike in cases in the Campbellton and Moncton regions, health officials have imposed new restrictions for those areas.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="For more on today’s top stories and the spread of the&nbsp;novel coronavirus across the country, please refer to our live updates below throughout the day, as well as our&nbsp;COVID-19 news hub.” data-reactid=”23″>For more on today’s top stories and the spread of the novel coronavirus across the country, please refer to our live updates below throughout the day, as well as our COVID-19 news hub.

19,008 active COVID-19 cases in Canada: 178,117 diagnoses, 9,585 deaths and 149,524 recoveries (as of Oct. 9, 6:30 p.m. ET)

  • Alberta – 2,225 active cases (19,995 total cases, including 282 deaths, 17,488 resolved)

  • British Columbia – 1,406 active cases (10,185 total cases, 245 deaths, 8,502 resolved)

  • Manitoba – 933 active cases (2,428 total cases, 30 deaths, 1,465 resolved)

  • New Brunswick – 37 active cases (238 cases, 2 deaths, 199 resolved)

  • Newfoundland and Labrador – 6 active case (279 total cases, 4 deaths, 269 resolved)

  • Northwest Territories – 0 active cases (5 total cases, 5 resolved)

  • Nova Scotia – 3 active cases (1,089 total cases, 65 deaths 1,021 resolved)

  • Ontario – 5,652 active cases (57,681 total cases, 2,997 deaths, 49,032 resolved)

  • Prince Edward Island – 3 active case (61 total cases, 58 resolved)

  • Quebec –  8,572 active cases (84,094 total cases, 5,936 deaths, 69,586 resolved)

  • Saskatchewan – 139 active cases (2,034 total cases, 24 deaths, 1,871 resolved)

  • Yukon – 0 active cases (15 total cases, 15 resolved)

  • Nunavut – 0 active cases (no resident cases)

  • CFB Trenton – 0 active cases (13 total cases, 13 resolved)

Ontario sees record-high increase, leading to more restrictions

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Ontario reported a record-high 939 new daily cases of COVID-19, which has prompted Doug Ford’s provincial government to impose new restrictions on hotspots Toronto, Peel Region and Ottawa.” data-reactid=”41″>Ontario reported a record-high 939 new daily cases of COVID-19, which has prompted Doug Ford’s provincial government to impose new restrictions on hotspots Toronto, Peel Region and Ottawa.

It’s the 12th straight day the province has exceeded the 500-case mark. Ontario’s daily case count continues to increase, breaking its own record on four occasions over two weeks. Before the recent stretch, the province had not reported more than 500 cases since May 2.

“My friends, the situation today is extremely serious,” said Premier Doug Ford. “All trends are going in the wrong direction.”

Of the most recent 939 cases, 336 were identified in Toronto, 150 in Peel, 126 in Ottawa, 68 in York, 59 in Halton, 40 in Hamilton, 32 in Durham, 28 in Simcoe-Muskoka and 24 in Middlesex-London. The remaining 25 public health units reported fewer than 20 cases, while nine of them reported no new patients at all.

The latest patients were identified after the province completed 44,914 tests. The 2.1 per cent positivity rate is the highest it has recorded since June 7.

There are 358 new cases among those 20-39 years old, the most of any age group. There are 266 new cases among those 40-59, 156 among those 19 and under, and 153 involving those who are at least 60 years old. Twelve of the patients involve long-term care residents and 12 involve health-care workers.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="In K-12 schools across Ontario, there are 56 new cases of COVID-19. That includes 32 among students, nine among staff and 15 that have not yet been identified by the Ministry of Health. Fourteen more schools have reported their first patients in the latest 24-hour stretch. Since they reopened in September, there have been 876 total cases among 429 learning institutions. Four of the province’s 4,828 schools have been forced to close.” data-reactid=”51″>In K-12 schools across Ontario, there are 56 new cases of COVID-19. That includes 32 among students, nine among staff and 15 that have not yet been identified by the Ministry of Health. Fourteen more schools have reported their first patients in the latest 24-hour stretch. Since they reopened in September, there have been 876 total cases among 429 learning institutions. Four of the province’s 4,828 schools have been forced to close.

In the latest 24-hour stretch, five more people have died, including two long-term care residents. In addition, 724 patients have recently recovered.

There are now 5,652 active cases throughout the province. The most Ontario has ever had was on April 25, when there were 5,675 infected patients province-wide during the peak of its first wave.

Of those currently infected patients, 2,325 are in Toronto, 970 in Ottawa and 877 in Peel Region and 540 in York.

Across Ontario, there are 225 people in hospital, the most since June 29. That includes 47 in intensive care and 29 who require a ventilator.

<h2 class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Quebec sees another 1,000-plus increase, 146 more cases in schools” data-reactid=”56″>Quebec sees another 1,000-plus increase, 146 more cases in schools

Quebec health officials announced 1,102 new cases of COVID-19 on Friday.

It’s now the seventh time in the past eight days that it has eclipsed 1,000-daily cases, a mark no other province has ever hit. Before the recent stretch, Quebec had not reported a 1,000-case increase since May 2. 

Of the latest cases, 345 were identified in the nation’s epicentre of Montreal, 182 in Montérégie, 144 in Quebec City, 87 in Laval, 74 in Mauricie-et-Centre-du-Québec, 67 in Chaudière-Appalaches, 54 in Laurentides, 38 in Estrie, 35 in Lanaudière and 31 in Outaouais.

In the latest 24-hour stretch, four more Quebecers have died. Eighteen other fatalities from previous dates were also added to its death toll, while one was recently removed following an investigation into the cause of death. It leaves the death toll at 5,936. 

In addition, 1,001 more people have recently recovered from the virus. Throughout the province, there are now 8,572 currently infected patients, which includes 433 in hospital (up by eight since Thursday) and 67 in intensive care (down by one).

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="In K-12 schools around the province,&nbsp;146 new cases of COVID-19&nbsp;were identified in the latest 24-hour reporting period, with 127 among students and 19 among staff. In that same stretch, 26 more schools reported their first case of COVID-19, while the province removed 41 class bubbles that they previously reported had shut down.” data-reactid=”66″>In K-12 schools around the province, 146 new cases of COVID-19 were identified in the latest 24-hour reporting period, with 127 among students and 19 among staff. In that same stretch, 26 more schools reported their first case of COVID-19, while the province removed 41 class bubbles that they previously reported had shut down.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Since schools opened, there have been 3,335 cases among students and staff. That includes 116 who recovered in the latest 24-hour stretch, leaving 1,799 currently infected patients in the system. So far,&nbsp;1,009 schools have had a case of COVID-19, with 781 of them having an active case at the moment. In total, 975 class bubbles have been shut down and asked to learn remotely.” data-reactid=”67″>Since schools opened, there have been 3,335 cases among students and staff. That includes 116 who recovered in the latest 24-hour stretch, leaving 1,799 currently infected patients in the system. So far, 1,009 schools have had a case of COVID-19, with 781 of them having an active case at the moment. In total, 975 class bubbles have been shut down and asked to learn remotely.

Quebec’s testing numbers are reflective of its output from two days prior. Most recently, it completed 29,729 tests for COVID-19, as it continues to push its capacity.

First school case identified in New Brunswick

Classes are cancelled at Sugarloaf High School in Campbellton after the principal confirmed there was a positive case of COVID-19. (Credit: Serge Bouchard/Radio Canada)
Classes are cancelled at Sugarloaf High School in Campbellton after the principal confirmed there was a positive case of COVID-19. (Credit: Serge Bouchard/Radio Canada)

Health officials in New Brunswick have announced that there’s been a confirmed case at Sugarloaf High School in Campbellton.

It’s the first school case that has been reported in the province since K-12 learning institutions opened for the fall semester.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="The school has since temporarily closed, while students will learn remotely on Oct. 13 and Oct. 14. It will give teachers time to prepare for the transition to full-time online learning for the high school students who live in Quebec, after the province announced the suspension of non-essential travel between the two provinces on Thursday.” data-reactid=”83″>The school has since temporarily closed, while students will learn remotely on Oct. 13 and Oct. 14. It will give teachers time to prepare for the transition to full-time online learning for the high school students who live in Quebec, after the province announced the suspension of non-essential travel between the two provinces on Thursday.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="The closure of the school has provided time for cleaning and contact tracing, according to Sugarloaf&nbsp;Senior High School principal Michael O'Toole, who announced the case on Thursday to parents and guardians on the school’s&nbsp;Facebook page.” data-reactid=”84″>The closure of the school has provided time for cleaning and contact tracing, according to Sugarloaf Senior High School principal Michael O’Toole, who announced the case on Thursday to parents and guardians on the school’s Facebook page.

“We understand you may feel anxious over the coming days,” said O’Toole. “Public Health officials will contact you if your child has been in close contact with the confirmed case and will tell you if your child needs to self-isolate.”

Those who haven’t been contacted will be able to continue to attend school when it reopens.

Along with the news about the school-related case, New Brunswick officials announced 13 new patients on Friday. Twelve of them are in the Campbellton zone — which previously just had one case of COVID-19 — while one more patient has been identified in Moncton.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="The cases range in age from 20-79 years old. One of the 13 cases is travel-related, as investigations into the other patients continue.” data-reactid=”88″>The cases range in age from 20-79 years old. One of the 13 cases is travel-related, as investigations into the other patients continue.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Upon the news, officials have decided to transition the Moncton and Campbellton regions to the “orange” level. It’s the second highest level as part of its COVID-19 recovery plan, which imposes further restrictions due to the heightened risk of COVID-19 in the community.&nbsp;” data-reactid=”89″>Upon the news, officials have decided to transition the Moncton and Campbellton regions to the “orange” level. It’s the second highest level as part of its COVID-19 recovery plan, which imposes further restrictions due to the heightened risk of COVID-19 in the community. 

No link has been found between the outbreaks in Moncton and Campbellton upon an initial investigation.

Throughout New Brunswick, there are now 37 active cases of COVID-19 — the most since April 12. Twenty-one of those currently infected patients are in the Moncton region, 13 are in the Campbellton region, two in the Saint John region and one in the Fredericton region.

A rise in cases became a concern for New Brunswick after at least 19 cases were linked to an outbreak at Manoir Notre-Dame special care home in Moncton. That includes 17 cases that were announced on Wednesday, while there are now 150 people that are self-isolating in connection to the outbreak, said the province’s chief medical officer of health Dr. Jennifer Russell.

Public health has also identified a potential public exposure to the virus at the McDonald’s Restaurant on Morton Avenue in Moncton. People who visited this location between 8 a.m. and 12 p.m. from Sept. 28 to Oct. 5. should self-monitor for symptoms for 14 days.

Updates from the rest of Canada

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Manitoba health officials announced 84 new cases of COVID-19 on Friday, which marks the second-largest spike it has recorded in a 24-hour stretch. On Aug. 23, the province reported 72 cases, but a day later health officials notified the public that the increase should have been 96 cases.” data-reactid=”99″>Manitoba health officials announced 84 new cases of COVID-19 on Friday, which marks the second-largest spike it has recorded in a 24-hour stretch. On Aug. 23, the province reported 72 cases, but a day later health officials notified the public that the increase should have been 96 cases.

Of the most recent 84 patients, 64 were identified in Manitoba, 12 in Interlake-Eastern, seven in Southern health and one in Prairie Mountain. Three more people have died in the province. The latest victims involve a female in her 80s and a female in her 70s, both from Winnipeg and linked to the outbreak at Parkview Place, and a female in her 80s from Winnipeg linked to Heritage Lodge.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Manitoba officials also notified the public about possible exposures at two schools, one in Winnipeg and the other in Kleefeld. In the latest 24-hour stretch, 11 more people have recovered. However, the province’s active case count went up to 933. It’s now the 12th time in the past 14 days that it has hit a new record high for currently infected Manitobans.” data-reactid=”101″>Manitoba officials also notified the public about possible exposures at two schools, one in Winnipeg and the other in Kleefeld. In the latest 24-hour stretch, 11 more people have recovered. However, the province’s active case count went up to 933. It’s now the 12th time in the past 14 days that it has hit a new record high for currently infected Manitobans.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Two new cases were identified in Newfoundland and Labrador, which increases its active case count to six. One of the recent cases is a female in her 40s in the Western Health region. She is a close contact of a previously identified patient. The other case is a man in his 40s in the Eastern Health region. Officials are “asking people who travelled on Air Canada Flight 690 from Toronto to St. John’s on Wednesday, October 7, 2020, to call 811 to arrange for COVID-19 testing.”” data-reactid=”102″>Two new cases were identified in Newfoundland and Labrador, which increases its active case count to six. One of the recent cases is a female in her 40s in the Western Health region. She is a close contact of a previously identified patient. The other case is a man in his 40s in the Eastern Health region. Officials are “asking people who travelled on Air Canada Flight 690 from Toronto to St. John’s on Wednesday, October 7, 2020, to call 811 to arrange for COVID-19 testing.”

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="In Alberta, 277 new cases of COVID-19 were identified by health officials. A woman in her 80s, linked to the outbreak at Shepherd’s Care Millwoods Long Term Care Centre in Edmonton, has passed away. However, the province has removed two fatalities from its death toll. In the latest 24-hour stretch, 150 patients have recovered, which leaves 2,225 active cases in the province. The Edmonton zone is home to 1,329 of those currently infected individuals, while the Calgary zone is home to 628. Around schools in the province, there are 76 that have had outbreaks declared, meaning there have been at least two cases among students and staff within a 14-day stretch.” data-reactid=”103″>In Alberta, 277 new cases of COVID-19 were identified by health officials. A woman in her 80s, linked to the outbreak at Shepherd’s Care Millwoods Long Term Care Centre in Edmonton, has passed away. However, the province has removed two fatalities from its death toll. In the latest 24-hour stretch, 150 patients have recovered, which leaves 2,225 active cases in the province. The Edmonton zone is home to 1,329 of those currently infected individuals, while the Calgary zone is home to 628. Around schools in the province, there are 76 that have had outbreaks declared, meaning there have been at least two cases among students and staff within a 14-day stretch.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="British Columbia health officials have identified 119 new patients, which includes four epi-linked cases. No one has died in the province’s latest 24-hour stretch, while 104 have recovered. There are now 1,406 active cases province-wide, with 3,180 people in self-isolation since they were in contact with a previously identified patient. There has been one new health-care facility outbreak at the Good Samaritan Delta View Care Centre.” data-reactid=”104″>British Columbia health officials have identified 119 new patients, which includes four epi-linked cases. No one has died in the province’s latest 24-hour stretch, while 104 have recovered. There are now 1,406 active cases province-wide, with 3,180 people in self-isolation since they were in contact with a previously identified patient. There has been one new health-care facility outbreak at the Good Samaritan Delta View Care Centre.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Saskatchewan health officials have identified 22 new cases of COVID-19, throughout the Saskatoon (five), Northern Central (four), Central East (four), Central West (three), Regina (two), South Central (two) and Far North East (two) zones. Twenty-six more people have recovered in that same stretch, which leaves 139 active cases in the province. Eight of those currently infected individuals are in hospital. The Central East zone has the most active cases with 42, as it continues to deal with outbreaks in Yorkton.” data-reactid=”105″>Saskatchewan health officials have identified 22 new cases of COVID-19, throughout the Saskatoon (five), Northern Central (four), Central East (four), Central West (three), Regina (two), South Central (two) and Far North East (two) zones. Twenty-six more people have recovered in that same stretch, which leaves 139 active cases in the province. Eight of those currently infected individuals are in hospital. The Central East zone has the most active cases with 42, as it continues to deal with outbreaks in Yorkton.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Nova Scotia reported no new patients on Friday, as its active case count remains at three. As of Prince Edward Island’s latest update on Oct. 6, there are three currently infected patients in its jurisdiction.” data-reactid=”106″>Nova Scotia reported no new patients on Friday, as its active case count remains at three. As of Prince Edward Island’s latest update on Oct. 6, there are three currently infected patients in its jurisdiction.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="For a timeline of all cases before today, please visit this page.” data-reactid=”107″>For a timeline of all cases before today, please visit this page.

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When it comes to COVID-19 vaccines, how good will be good enough? – National Post

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Article content continued

The difficulty is, hospital admissions and deaths from COVID-19 are uncommon, and it would require a large population over a longer period to accumulate enough deaths to see a difference between the vaccine and placebo group, Kimmelman said.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has set a minimum target of 50 per cent efficacy for a COVID-19 vaccine, meaning a vaccine would have to be 50 per cent better than a placebo at preventing disease.

In an early-stage study, Moderna’s COVID-19 vaccine produced neutralizing antibodies in 45 healthy, 18- to 55-year-olds who received two vaccinations, 28 days apart, the company reported in the New England Journal of Medicine. Side effects — fatigue, chills, headache or muscle aches — occurred in more than half the participants.

Dr. Jacqueline Miller, head of Moderna’s infectious diseases development, told last week’s FDA advisory panel meeting that more than 25,000 people have received both doses of its study vaccine, or a placebo, and that the vaccine was designed to evaluate Americans “at the highest risk of severe COVID disease.” Forty-two per cent of study participants are older adults or people with heart disease, diabetes or other underlying conditions, Miller added.

A technician works in a lab at Sinovac Biotech where the company is producing their potential COVID-19 vaccine CoronaVac during a media tour on Sept. 24, 2020 in Beijing, China. Photo by Kevin Frayer/Getty Images

AstraZeneca’s vaccine, developed with Oxford University, has produced an immune response in both the young and old, Reuters reported this week. Less clear is how well an antibody response translates into how well any vaccine can actually fend off COVID.

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Fastly Announces Third Quarter 2020 Financial Results – Business Wire

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SAN FRANCISCO–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Fastly, Inc. (NYSE: FSLY), provider of an edge cloud platform, today posted its financial results for the third quarter 2020 in its shareholder letter on the Investor Relations section of its website at https://investors.fastly.com.

“Despite the customer-specific challenges we faced this quarter, we are pleased with the continued strength and resilience of our business, including a 42% year-over-year top-line growth in the third quarter,” said Joshua Bixby, CEO of Fastly. “We not only continued to gain new customers, with the second-highest quarter of new customer additions since going public, but we also expanded our engagement with existing customers. Looking ahead, we remain confident in the future of Fastly. Customers are increasingly relying on our platform to transform their businesses, and we are delivering on two key pillars of our long-term strategy with Secure@Edge and Compute@Edge.”

Fastly management will host a live Q&A session today at 2:00 p.m. PT / 5:00 p.m. ET to discuss financial results and outlook.

Fastly Third Quarter 2020 Q&A Session

When: Wednesday, October 28, 2020

Time: 2:00 p.m. PT / 5:00 p.m. ET

Conference ID: 2491525

Live Call: (833) 968-2077 (US/Canada) or (236) 714-2139 (International)

Webcast: https://investors.fastly.com

The webcast will be archived on the investor relations site following the call.

About Fastly

Fastly helps people stay better connected with the things they love. Fastly’s edge cloud platform enables customers to create great digital experiences quickly, securely, and reliably by processing, serving, and securing our customers’ applications as close to their end-users as possible — at the edge of the internet. Fastly’s platform is designed to take advantage of the modern internet, to be programmable, and to support agile software development with unmatched visibility and minimal latency, empowering developers to innovate with both performance and security. Fastly’s customers include many of the world’s most prominent companies, including Vimeo, Pinterest, The New York Times, and GitHub.

This press release contains “forward-looking” statements that are based on our beliefs and assumptions and on information currently available to us on the date of this press release. Forward-looking statements may involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties, and other factors that may cause our actual results, performance, or achievements to be materially different from those expressed or implied by the forward-looking statements. These statements include, but are not limited to, statements regarding our future financial and operating performance, including our outlook and guidance, our ability to gain new customers and expand engagement with existing customers, our customers’ reliance on our platform to transform their business, and our ability to deliver on our long-term strategy. Except as required by law, we assume no obligation to update these forward-looking statements publicly or to update the reasons actual results could differ materially from those anticipated in the forward-looking statements, even if new information becomes available in the future. Important factors that could cause our actual results to differ materially are detailed from time to time in the reports Fastly files with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), including in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2019, and our Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q. Copies of reports filed with the SEC are posted on Fastly’s website and are available from Fastly without charge.

Source: Fastly, Inc.

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Canadians are feeling pandemic fatigue. Experts say ‘greater good’ message isn’t enough – Global News

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COVID-weary. COVID-tired. COVID-fatigued.

No matter how you chop it up, the feeling likely resonates for many at this point in the coronavirus pandemic. Months of isolation, fears and lifestyle changes have taken its toll. In turn, following COVID-19 safety guidelines has begun to feel like more and more of a challenge.

A new poll puts into perspective just how fatigued Canadians are. The poll, conducted by Ipsos, found nearly half of Canadians are getting tired of following public health recommendations and rules related to the virus. The feeling of burnout was most prominent in Quebec (52 per cent) and Alberta (53 per cent) and less so in British Columbia (34 per cent).

Read more:
Coronavirus ‘fatigue’ is real, but we can’t give up, says World Health Organization

The challenge now — both for people and policymakers — is tackling it.

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Igor Grossmann, psychology professor and director of the Wisdom and Culture Lab at the University of Waterloo, said understanding the situation at hand might help strengthen our resolve.

“We often get this ‘hunker down and get through it’ message,” he said. “But if we start accepting that this is a marathon situation, the sooner we develop meaning out of the situation.”


Click to play video 'Riots in Italy, pushback in Spain over COVID-19 curfews and rules'



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Riots in Italy, pushback in Spain over COVID-19 curfews and rules


Riots in Italy, pushback in Spain over COVID-19 curfews and rules

Falling off the bandwagon

Not only has the medley of measures imposed by countries plunged economies into a sharp contraction, it’s also had a profound impact on people’s psychological well-being. Nine months since the lockdown, rules and restrictions still keep many aspects of life fenced in. In a separate poll, 25 per cent of Canadians said their stress level is higher than during the first COVID-19 wave.


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Coronavirus: How stress and fatigue is taking its toll in the pandemic


Coronavirus: How stress and fatigue is taking its toll in the pandemic

Understandably, “we’re exhausted,” said Steven Joordens, a psychology professor at the University of Toronto Scarborough.

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High-stress situations often elicit a “fight-or-flight” response, he said, but that reaction is “meant to be short term.”

“When there’s a predator in front of you, you either take on the predator or get the heck away from them. Either way, 15 or 20 minutes and it’s over, and you come out of that state,” he said.

“We’ve had this predator staring in our face for months.”

What’s followed is a collective burnout or exhaustion, and everyone experiences it differently. Some may feel restless, irritable, lack motivation or have difficulty concentrating on tasks. Some people may find themselves withdrawing from socializing, while others might feel physical symptoms like changes in eating and sleep habits. Young people are particularly susceptible, according to Joordens.

Read more:
As cases increase, are Montrealers suffering from ‘COVID-19 fatigue’?


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How ‘pandemic fatigue’ could be leading to case surge


How ‘pandemic fatigue’ could be leading to case surge

The age divide is reflected in the Ipsos poll. Pandemic fatigue was highest among Generation Z (57 per cent), Millennials (50 per cent), and Generation X (53 per cent).

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The burnout has become somewhat of an adversary for governments trying to quell a second wave of the virus.

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Canada’s top doctor has repeatedly urged Canadians “not to give into COVID-19 fatigue.” So has the WHO. Its researchers estimate that about half the population of Europe is experiencing “pandemic fatigue” as infections surge yet again.

But the “stay home” message has expired, and experts worry the “greater good” or “we’re all in this together” message designed to keep people engaged has too.

“It’s very abstract,” said Grossmann. “For some people, it might work. But for individuals facing economic hardships because of the crisis, or people who are more concerned about simply surviving the next day with kids running around, that doesn’t resonate anymore.”


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Coronavirus: WHO acknowledges pandemic fatigue, asks people not to give up


Coronavirus: WHO acknowledges pandemic fatigue, asks people not to give up

What needs to change?

For one, we need to acknowledge “things are different now,” said Samantha Yammine, a neuroscientist and science communicator.

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Not only do we know far more about the virus than in March, we also have tools to make activities safer, said Yammine. She said too much of the focus has been the “no’s” and “you cant’s” despite the public appetite for wanting to do things, but do them safely.

“Fatigue comes from frustration.

“If we focus on what we can’t do rather than what we can, that’s why we fatigue. It feels very limiting.”

This is where adopting a harm reduction approach would be helpful, she said, both on an individual level and policy level.

“Every decision is a big task. … We’re at a point where should say, ‘Here’s how you reduce your risk as much as possible.’”

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Yammine said people need to feel empowered to make a choice through the right information.

“I think then they’ll feel less trapped and hopefully less fatigued,” she said.

According to the recent polling, 93 per cent of Canadians say they’re doing their best to abide by public health recommendations and rules. Support for safety measures also remains high. On masks, nearly 86 per cent of Canadians say they support the mandatory wearing of face masks when in public, with younger Canadians even more likely to be wearing them when out-and-about.

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“We’re in this process of modifying all of our habits, and it will get easier,” said Joordens.


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Coronavirus: Trudeau acknowledges COVID-19 fatigue setting in with ‘tough winter ahead’, says it ‘really sucks’


Coronavirus: Trudeau acknowledges COVID-19 fatigue setting in with ‘tough winter ahead’, says it ‘really sucks’

He said it was trickiest when things first reopened, which might have sent out mixed signals. When governments opted to open bars, restaurants and gyms, even with new rules, he said some people might have interpreted that as these places being safe or safer.

“Habits are triggered by the environment. So as soon as you go back into that bar, everything about it triggers you to behave like you did the last time you were there,” he said.

“The hope is that we develop new habits over time to keep up with the changes.”

But it won’t be easy, said Grossmann. He said the vagueness in some of the ever-changing recommendations deviates from the core message — that “this won’t be over anytime soon.”

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“Not every situation is alike, but we need to figure out how to balance something that is challenging in different ways across different provinces and different municipalities,” he said.

“You don’t want a new rule to come in and have people say, ‘Well, that doesn’t apply to me.’”

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What can you do personally?

A looming winter will provide an extra challenge, experts agree. Weariness over restrictions might grow as cold weather forces people indoors.

It comes down to arming yourself with the “basics,” said Joordens — a good night’s sleep, good nutrition and routine exercise.

“Leading a random life makes our body unhappy,” he said. “You have to find activities that bring you to a better place mentally.”

Before the snow piles up, think about ways to get outdoors in advance, he said. And once it does, make sure you stay connected socially.


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Winter blues setting in? How to cope during colder months


Winter blues setting in? How to cope during colder months

“I recommend the phone because people actually pay attention when they’re talking to you on the phone,” he said with a laugh.

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It’s also good to remember that we’re not perfect, said Yammine.

“We’re still going to face tough decisions. It’s still going to feel exhausting,” she said. But keeping up with the twist-and-turns of pandemic rules and recommendations is “like any goal you can set.”

“A New Year’s resolution, even,” she said.

“People often say you give up on your resolution the first time you slip up — but that’s not the right thinking. Just because maybe you have more riskier encounter or you just don’t care one day, it doesn’t mean you can’t do better the next.”

“Risk is cumulative. It doesn’t need to be all or nothing. We can try again.”

These are some of the findings of an Ipsos poll conducted between October 23-26, 2020, on behalf of Global News. For this survey, a sample of 1,000 Canadians aged 18+ was interviewed online. Quotas and weighting were employed to ensure that the sample’s composition reflects that of the Canadian population according to census parameters. The precision of Ipsos online polls is measured using a credibility interval. In this case, the poll is accurate to within ± 3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20, had all Canadians aged 18+ been polled. The credibility interval will be wider among subsets of the population. All sample surveys and polls may be subject to other sources of error, including, but not limited to coverage error, and measurement error.

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© 2020 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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