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Canada's SOCAN Reports Growth In 2019, Distributions Shrink Due to Tech Rollout – Billboard

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Finally, the company says that mechanical royalties totaled C$12 million ($9 million) last year.

As part of its results, the company acknowledged that its move to diversify beyond performance rights collections begun in 2016 has not worked out to its satisfactions. So it says it’s taking steps to rectify that situation.

As part of that move, SOCAN said it registered a C$41.7 million ($31 million) impairment charge to its Dataclef subsidiary. But that charge have not impacted distribution, the organization said.

Dataclef includes its acquisitions of Audiam, which tracks songwriter royalties at YouTube and other digital services for songwriters; Musicnet; and the Canadian mechanical licensing organization SODRAC.

“At the time of our investment in these operations, we were exploring new ways to support our members by creating other revenue streams and leveraging new technologies,” SOCAN interim CEO Jennifer Brown said in a statement. “Business plans didn’t come to fruition in the way we anticipated. Through the evaluation process, it became clear that we should divest ourselves of Dataclef assets.

Besides the sale of Dataclef assets, the SOCAN plan will result in a significant reduction in the organization’s overhead, the company report said. Meanwhile, Brown added, “We are, however, encouraged by significant success with our new technology system and our improved matching and processing capabilities.”

According to the organization financial result announcement, going forward SOCAN’s management and board of directors are focusing on core work for member; and will stick to investments that will allow its team to focus on its core purpose of helping music creators and publishers thrive; and expanding domestic licensing of music.

A more detailed report on the organization’s financial is expected on Nov. 10, the day of SOCAN’s annual general meeting, which this year will be held online.

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Should you buy the Galaxy S9 or Galaxy S9+ in 2020? – SamMobile

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The Galaxy S9 and Galaxy S9+ are nearing their three-year anniversary and now that the Galaxy S21 is just around the corner, you might be able to find the 2018 flagship on sale for a great price. The question is whether or not you should buy the Galaxy S9 or Galaxy S9+ in late 2020, lower price and all.

If you’ve read our previous story on buying the Galaxy Note 9 in 2020 then you might already have an idea of where this is headed, seeing how the two series were released six months apart and share many characteristics. See, the Galaxy S9 and Galaxy S9+ are still powerful and featureful-enough to be relevant in 2020, but they are far from futureproof.

In addition, the Galaxy Note 9 series offers the advantage of an S Pen paired with an updated S Pen suite of apps. In a way, the Galaxy Note 9 can represent an inexpensive way to acquire the S Pen, whereas the Galaxy S9 series doesn’t have a unique feature like the S Pen to cling onto. It’s slightly less relevant than the Galaxy Note 9 in this day and age because of this, but let’s take a quick look at a few other reasons why you’d want to buy or avoid the Galaxy S9 series in 2020.

Reasons to buy the Galaxy S9 / Galaxy S9+ in 2020

In short, the reasons why you’d want to buy the Galaxy S9 / Galaxy S9+ in 2020 lie in a few older features that have aged surprisingly well. For example, the Super AMOLED display doesn’t support 120Hz but it still has a high pixel count of 2960 x 1440 while supporting HDR10, and for better or for worse, it doesn’t have a notch or cutout.

The fingerprint scanner’s location is not very convenient but the sensor itself is very fast and accurate, more so than current under-display solutions. In addition, it’s equipped with an iris scanner as well as an Sp02 sensor – two technologies that are no longer included in the latest Galaxy flagship models.

Last but not least, the Galaxy S9 series is equipped with USB-C and 3.5mm ports. Granted, a lot more smartphone users are transitioning to wireless solutions but the 3.5mm port remains relevant for many people, whether it’s because they want to spend less money on earbuds or they reside in the completely opposite camp and wish to pair their smartphones with audiophile-grade headphones, many of which lack USB-C connectivity.

Reasons to avoid the Galaxy S9 / Galaxy S9+ in 2020

First things first, this isn’t a reason to avoid the Galaxy S9 series per se but it is an unavoidable fact that might cause you to lose interest in the lineup: it’s very difficult to come by in 2020. As of this writing, the Galaxy S9+ is M.I.A. on the Samsung USA portal whereas the Galaxy S9 is listed but it’s not available for purchase. Your best bet is finding a refurbished model sold by a third-party at a discount.

Then there’s the fact that the Galaxy S9 series will no longer undergo significant firmware changes. The lineup received One UI 2.5 last month as its last major update. Meanwhile, newer flagships that were shipped with Android 9 out of the box are now eligible for three major Android OS updates following Samsung’s change of policy.

Finally, even if the Galaxy S9 and Galaxy S9+ remain relatively competent today, their age is starting to show in certain areas. The Galaxy S9, in particular, has only 4GB of RAM, so if you really want to buy one of the two models then you’d probably want to go for the Galaxy S9+ with 6GB of RAM. Either way, they both lack 5G support and amenities such as Wireless PowerShare and faster-than-15W wired charging.


In conclusion, the S Pen is giving the Galaxy Note 9 more relevance in 2020 but the Galaxy S9 series isn’t as lucky. Should you buy the Galaxy S9 or Galaxy S9+ in 2020? Assuming you find a good deal and you’re not put off by the lack of new firmware updates, 5G, top-end performance, super-fast charging, a full-screen design, and newer One UI features, then it could still be a decent choice. It is a tough sell indeed…

Just remember that 4GB of RAM can become an issue, and depending on your expectations, you might be tempted to replace the Galaxy S9/S9+ with a newer phone sooner rather than later. The Galaxy S20 FE is already a good value proposition and it’s a newer, better phone even though it may lack some of the Galaxy S9’s older features. Check our new device comparison widget below for a closer look, or a reminder of what hardware the Galaxy S9 series has to offer.

  • Model: SM-G960F
  • Dimensions: Bar: 147.7 x 68.7 x 8.5 mm
  • Display: 5.8 inch / 147.32 mm Super AMOLED Display
  • CPU: Exynos 9810
  • Camera: 12MP

  • Model: SM-G965F
  • Dimensions: Bar: 158.1 x 73.8 x 8.5 mm
  • Display: 6.2 inch / 157.48 mm Super AMOLED Display
  • CPU: Exynos 9810
  • Camera: 12MP

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RIP Galaxy Note: Samsung Galaxy Z Fold 3 will reportedly take over – Tom's Guide

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Samsung is banking on its flagship foldable phone series, and it’s easy to understand why. The Galaxy Z Fold 2 impressed with its debut this fall, especially given the rocky launch of its predecessor. And with rumors heating up about the Galaxy Z Fold 3, Samsung’s upcoming foldable could stake out an even bigger role in the company’s phone lineup.

How big? Korean publication Aju News claims that the Galaxy Z Fold 3 will take center stage by the middle of 2021, as the phone maker discontinues its long-running Galaxy Note product line.

Dropping the Galaxy Note would be a big move for Samsung, as the phablet line has been a central focus at Samsung for a little less than a decade. Samsung hasn’t commented on the growing number of rumors about the Note’s fate, which started in earnest more than a week ago when noted leaker Ice Universe tweeted that there was no indication Samsung was working on a new version of the Note.

That hasn’t been the case with the Galaxy Z Fold 3, which has been the focus of many rumors and leaks — the biggest of which suggests that it will feature a stylus similar to the Note’s S Pen. That has been the Note’s exclusive feature, which suggests to some that the phablet’s days are numbered in favor of a foldable phone with a larger screen.

Additionally, the Galaxy Note 20 series experienced sluggish sales, not long after launching. According to analytics firm Counterpoint Research, the Galaxy Note 20 and Galaxy Note 20 Ultra ended up placing only fourth and eighth in the top 10 smartphone sales just in the first week of September alone behind the iPhone 11 line. With opening numbers like these, it seems obvious that Samsung would be wise to rethink its phone lineup.

The Aju News report claims that Samsung was able to find an in-screen digitizer that lets the S Pen work with the Galaxy Z Fold 2’s foldable screen that has a much thinner layer of glass than traditional smartphones. Without making changes to the S Pen, the stylus would scratch up the Fold’s display

Other rumors suggest that the Galaxy Z Fold 3 will feature under-screen camera technology, a first for Samsung that will get rid of visible cut-outs for cameras in the phone’s screen.

According to Aju News, the Galaxy Z Fold 3 could debut as soon as June, which would be earlier than the usual August/September rollout for the Galaxy Note. But we could get a sign that the Note’s days are numbered before then with the early 2021 release of the Galaxy S21. If that new phone lineup adopts more Galaxy Note features — like stylus support — the Galaxy Note’s days could be truly numbered. 

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Sony says that variable refresh rate feature for PlayStation 5 is in the works – GSMArena.com news – GSMArena.com

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In a recently updated PS5 FAQ section, Sony has confirmed that the variable refresh rate feature isn’t supported yet on its new Playstation 5 console, but it will be in the near future. This is rather strange because the console has HDMI 2.1, which supports the VRR by default.

For instance, the Xbox Series X, Series S and One X all support VRR, which turns out to be a pretty cool feature not only for PC gamers but for console gamers as well. Especially since the new hardware can do 120fps at 1080p and 4K. Some of the games tend to suffer feom the occasional dip lf the framerate so VRR smooths out the gaming experience quite a bit.

Of course, keep in mind that even if you have a PS5 and Sony releases the patch to enable VRR, it might not work with your TV. The latter should have HDMI 2.1 support as well to enable VRR.

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