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Canadian tech firm Lightspeed walloped by short seller attack – CBC.ca

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Fast-growing Canadian technology company Lightspeed is pushing back after a short seller alleged the company has misled investors about its financial health, causing a $2 billion plunge in the company’s value.

On Wednesday, Spruce Point Management, an American short-selling investment firm with a history of targeting Canadian companies, put out a lengthy report on Montreal-based Lightspeed Inc., alleging the company has covered up “massive inflation” of how many customers it has, how much money it makes from them, and how much growth potential it has.

Lightspeed is a payment processing company that helps small businesses sell things online and in person. It has been compared to Ottawa-based Shopify, which is currently the most valuable company in Canada.

Lightspeed “baits investors with its massive potential in its payments solution, but we believe it has not been transparent about competitive pressures and material margin decline,” the report says, among other allegations.

“We believe Lightspeed is crowding into Shopify’s space, and will be forced to compete head-to-head with it, and new entrants such as Amazon. We believe Lightspeed will lose the battle.”

WATCH | Spruce Point lays out its case against Lightspeed:

[embedded content]

The report prompted shares in Lightspeed to plummet by more than 11 per cent on Wednesday, closing at $126 a share on the Toronto Stock Exchange.

Prior to the short seller’s report, the company’s share price has been a rocket ship during the pandemic. After bottoming out at around $12 a share early in the pandemic, Lightspeed’s value has marched steadily higher for more than a year to nearly 10 times what it was worth in its IPO barely two years ago.

Lightspeed has seen growing demand for its services as more retailers start to sell things online during the pandemic, but the company has also grown because of an aggressive strategy of acquiring smaller rivals, something Spruce Point says is also dubious.

Spruce Point says the company is massively overvalued, and is poised to plummet to as low as $22 a share.

Short sellers such as Spruce Point make money when stocks in the companies they are shorting go down. They do this by borrowing existing shares, selling them, and then buying them back later to replace what they borrowed at what they hope will be a lower price later on.

WATCH | How short selling works:

How short selling works

2 years ago

An animated explanation of how people make money from stocks losing value 0:46

Lightspeed isn’t the first Canadian company that Spruce Point has targeted. Previously, the short seller has taken aim at Dollarama, Canadian Tire and waste management firm GFL, with varying degrees of success.

Lightspeed said nothing to address the report for most of Wednesday, but after markets closed the company put out a short, terse statement denying the allegations.

“The report contains numerous important inaccuracies and mischaracterizations which Lightspeed believes are misleading and clearly intended to benefit Spruce Point, which itself has disclosed that it stands to profit in the event that the stock price of Lightspeed declines,” the company said.

Spruce Point has not declared how much of the company’s shares it is shorting, but data compiled by Bloomberg shows that about 2.5 million shares in the company are being shorted overall. That’s about two per cent of the company.

“Lightspeed is confident in its governance, financial reporting and business practices. Lightspeed has consistently delivered revenue growth since its initial listing on the Toronto Stock Exchange in March 2019.”

Investors don’t seem to know who to believe on Thursday, as Lightspeed shares jumped up by five per cent when the stock market opened, but nearing midday the stock was once again in negative territory, changing hands at about $125 a share. Wednesday’s sell-off knocked $2 billion off the value of the company.

For its part, Spruce Point called Lightspeed’s defence “laughable.”

Lightspeed “provided a total dodge and deflect response and effectively told all its investors to go buzz off with that boilerplate non-response PR late yesterday,” Spruce Point said in a tweet on Thursday morning.

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Deadline today for B.C. health workers to be vaccinated against COVID-19 – BC News – Castanet.net

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The deadline for British Columbia health-care workers to be fully vaccinated against COVID-19 is today.

The provincial health officer’s order covers doctors, nurses, students, residents, contractors, volunteers and all other health-care professionals.

Premier John Horgan says he’s hopeful that the small number of workers who are resistant to getting vaccinated will get the information they need to get their shots.

Those who don’t have their first dose of vaccine by the deadline can’t work unless they have a recognized exemption.

The order says unvaccinated workers who get their first shot before Nov. 15 can resume working seven days after the first dose, but they must wear personal protective equipment and take other precautions until they get their second shot.

The Health Ministry says 94 per cent of B.C. health workers were fully vaccinated as of Oct. 24, three per cent were unvaccinated and two per cent had one dose.

Overall, B.C. has reached an 89.6 per cent vaccination rate for first shots among eligible residents age 12 and up and 84.4 per cent have received their second dose.

Provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry and Dr. Penny Ballem, the lead of the B.C. immunization rollout team, will provide an update on COVID-19 on Tuesday.

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Blue Origin, Boeing reveal plan to build 'business park' space station – CBC.ca

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Billionaire Jeff Bezos-owned Blue Origin on Monday unveiled plans to develop a commercial space station called “Orbital Reef” with Boeing, aiming to launch the spacecraft in the second half of this decade.

The venture will be built in partnership with Sierra Space, the spaceflight wing of defence contractor Sierra Nevada Corp, and will be backed by Redwire Space, Genesis Engineering Solutions and Arizona State University.

Orbital Reef will be operated as a “mixed use business park,” and plans to provide the infrastructure needed to scale economic activity and open new markets in space, Blue Origin and Sierra Space said.

“Seasoned space agencies, high-tech consortia, sovereign nations without space programs, media and travel companies, funded entrepreneurs and sponsored inventors, and future-minded investors all have a place on Orbital Reef,” the companies said in a statement.

Sierra in April announced plans to offer the first free-flying commercial space station.

In July, Blue Origin had a successful debut space tourism flight, with Bezos and three others aboard. Earlier this month, 90-year-old Canadian actor William Shatner — Captain James Kirk of Star Trek fame — became the oldest person in space aboard a rocketship flown by Blue Origin.

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Tesla stock surges as Hertz orders 100,000 electric cars – Aljazeera.com

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  1. Tesla stock surges as Hertz orders 100,000 electric cars  Aljazeera.com
  2. Hertz to buy 100,000 Teslas for its rental fleet by next year  CBC.ca
  3. Tesla soars on Hertz deal  CNBC Television
  4. The Hertz-Tesla Deal Will Help Normalize Electric Cars  Bloomberg
  5. Elon Musk Makes Tesla, Hertz and Bitcoin Memes Go Up  Bloomberg
  6. View Full coverage on Google News



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