Connect with us

News

Canadians living in China watch developments in Meng case closely – CTV News

Published

on


Canadian teacher Christopher Maclure remembers the first time he felt afraid living in China.

Almost all the newspapers there carried stories about how angry Chinese officials were when Huawei’s chief financial officer Meng Wanzhou was detained by Canadian authorities in Vancouver at the behest of the United States.

But it wasn’t until a few days later when the two Canadians, Michael Kovrig and Michael Spavor, were arrested by China that Maclure felt fear.

“That’s when I got really scared,” he said in a phone interview from China where he has lived for more than two decades. “It was the top news story in China.”

Meng has been held in Canada since December 2018. She’s out on bail while fighting extradition to the United States on fraud charges. Last week, her lawyers’ first round of arguments was thrown out by a B.C. judge, meaning the case continues.

Nine days after Meng’s arrest, Chinese authorities sent Kovrig, an ex-diplomat working for the International Crisis Group, and Spavor, an entrepreneur who did business in North Korea, to prison. They are accused of violating China’s national security interests, but Canadian argues the men have been “arbitrarily detained.”

Maclure said his family was quite worried while these events played out and their fears were renewed when the B.C. court ruled against Meng last week.

But Maclure said he has felt safer in China than in any country in the West, he said.

“Everything is on camera here. It provides me with a sense of security,” he said. “And I speak Chinese quite well.”

Maclure said he censors what he says on WeChat, a Chinese social media site.

“Being a teacher … I’m sometimes a little paranoid that I’d be a person to detain,” he said. “We have a saying in China that when it’s all the same the tallest tree gets the most wind. It means the more you express your opinion, the more critical you are, the more likely you are to get cut down.”

Myriam Larouche, a Quebec woman who is a graduate student in China, said she’s not worried about being affected by the Meng case. Larouche is in Canada now, but she plans to return to China once flights resume and school starts.

Larouche said she had “some concerns” when she heard the two Canadians were arrested, but “I asked some friends and they said ‘No, no you don’t have to be worried.’ “

Global Affairs Canada said there are currently 12,885 Canadian citizens in China who have voluntarily registered with the department.

Ottawa is “aware” of 118 Canadians currently in custody in greater China with the most common charges being drug-related and fraud.

A court in southern China handed down a death penalty to a Canadian in April of last year on drug charges. In a separate drug smuggling case, China sentenced Canadian Robert Lloyd Schellenberg to death in a sudden retrial in January — one month after Kovrig and Spavor were detained.

Wayne Duplessis had been living in China for more than two decades prior to the COVID-19 pandemic and said he hopes to go back.

He remembers reading about the arrests of Meng, Kovrig and Spavor.

“A friend contacted me a couple of days after (Kovrig and Spavor were arrested) and said, ‘are you concerned?’ I guess there was a brief moment when I thought ‘should I be concerned?’ “

But that passed, Duplessis said.

He said he and his family have been treated well in China and people there have a lot of respect for Canada.

“By and large I never feel uncomfortable about this. It seems very much unrelated to us.”

Duplessis said he feels badly for Spavor and Kovrig.

“I can’t imagine what it would be like to be in custody for more than 500 days — even one day. Terrifying,” he said

Canadians living in China can stay in touch with the embassy and cultivate “good working relationships locally,” he said.

“I hope this is a blip and I hope that things get cleared.”

But people can’t be ruled by their fears, he added.

“We have to move forward or we just don’t get anywhere. So, you try to be as cautious as you can, you try to understand the risks — there’s no sense in being foolish about it — but we do have to move forward.

“We do have to build our lives.”

This report by The Canadian Press was first published June 4, 2020.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

News

Canadian drivers with U.S. licence plates harassed by fellow Canadians – CBC.ca

Published

on


Some Canadians driving cars with U.S. licence plates say they’ve endured vandalism, harassment and even a minor assault from fellow Canadians convinced that they’re Americans illegally in Canada. 

Lisa Watt said she was harassed twice in Calgary last month — she believes because of her Texas licence plates. 

In one incident, she said a driver stopped right behind her car in a parking lot and glared at her, and in another situation, a driver tailgated her car for several kilometres before pulling up beside her and flipping her the finger. 

“It made me angry,” said Watt, a Canadian citizen who moved to Houston in 2000 for work. She drove to Calgary in June to visit her 84-year-old mother, who was feeling isolated during the COVID-19 pandemic. 

“I’m here to help my mother. I have every right to be here.”

To help stop the spread of the coronavirus, the Canada-U.S. land border remains closed to non-essential traffic. As a result, some Canadians are alarmed when they spot cars with U.S. licence plates, especially as COVID-19 cases south of the border escalate.

There is reason for concern. Alberta RCMP said that since mid-June, they have fined 10 Americans $1,200 each after they sneaked in to Banff National Park. 

RCMP have issued 10 tickets to Americans since mid-June at Banff National Park. There are legitimate reasons for a U.S.-plated vehicle in Canada during the pandemic but stopping to see the sights is not one of them. (Jeff McIntosh/The Canadian Press)

Americans are allowed to drive straight through Canada to Alaska for work or to return home, but they can’t stop in Banff — or anywhere else — to see the sights.

However, not all drivers of cars with U.S. plates in Canada are breaking the rules. 

Watt wants Albertans to know she’s a patriotic Canadian who’s taking every precaution while in the country. She self-quarantined for 14 days when arriving in Calgary and wears a face mask in stores. 

She said both incidents of harassment happened on June 21, the day she finished her quarantine and headed to town to run errands.

Watt, right, and her mother, Maureen, pictured in Calgary. (Submitted by Maureen Watt)

‘You can’t judge a book by its cover’

As a result of her experiences, Watt started driving her mother’s car — which has Alberta plates. 

“I’m a little afraid to leave my car parked anywhere for fear somebody does something to it,” she said. “I’d like people to understand that people with U.S. licence plates have legitimate reasons for being here.”

Mayor Phil Harding of the Township of Muskoka Lakes also wants to spread that message. 

“You can’t judge a book by its cover,” said Harding, whose township is part of the Muskoka region, a vacation hot spot in Ontario. 

The mayor said he recently heard from several Canadians with U.S.-plated cars in the region, who claimed they were accused of being Americans unlawfully in Canada.

“‘You shouldn’t be here. Americans aren’t allowed. How did you get across the border?'” said Harding, about the types of accusations the drivers have fielded from local residents. 

Car keyed at marina

In one case, a woman reported that her husband’s car — which has Michigan plates — was scratched with a key, said the mayor. 

CBC News confirmed the incident with the woman who said the approximately metre-long scratch appeared after the car had been parked at a marina on June 6. 

The woman said she and her husband are Canadian but that her husband works for an American company and drives a company car with U.S. plates. The woman asked that their names be kept confidential because her husband doesn’t want his workplace associated with this story. 

“We think it’s terrible and are really aware that we are a target with our U.S.-plated company vehicle,” said the woman about the incident in an email. “This makes you aware that the cross-border tension is building.”

WATCH | COVID-19 could close Canada-U.S. border for a year, expert says:

Infection control epidemiologist Colin Furness predicts the Canada-U.S. border will only open if a COVID-19 vaccine is created or if enough people have been infected with the virus and build herd immunity. 9:17

Snowbird accosted

In another incident in Huntsville, also in the Muskoka region, Ontario Provincial Police (OPP) said a Canadian filed a police report after he was allegedly accosted by two men upset over the Florida plates on his car. 

OPP spokesperson Jason Folz said the incident happened on June 12 at a car wash. 

“They harassed him, and the assault was they poked him in the chest, demanding to know why he was in Canada.”

Folz said the man is a snowbird who spends winters in Florida and owns a car with Florida plates. 

“People are stressed [about COVID-19], and it comes out in strange ways. This is perhaps one of those ways,” said Folz about the incident. 

Lawyer avoids crossing border

U.S. immigration lawyer Len Saunders said several of his clients — who are dual Canadian-U.S. citizens or essential workers crossing the border — have complained of mean looks when driving their U.S.-plated car in Canada. 

As a result, Saunders said he avoids crossing the border, even though he can as an essential worker and a dual citizen. 

“I’m concerned about being socially shamed up there in B.C., driving a U.S.-plated car because I’ve heard from multiple clients, stories of dirty looks,” said Saunders, whose office sits close to the British Columbia border in Blaine, Wash.

He said he can understand why some Canadians get upset when spotting U.S. licence plates in the country, considering COVID-19 cases are spiking in some U.S. states.

But they must remember that many people driving U.S.-plated cars in Canada are there for a valid reason, Saunders said. 

“They really have to look at the big picture before they pass judgment.”

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

News

Canadian Armed Forces member arrested after gaining access to Rideau Hall grounds – CBC.ca

Published

on


Police have arrested a Canadian Armed Forces member who they say was armed and had gained access to the grounds at Rideau Hall early Thursday morning.

The man “breached the main pedestrian entrance” at 1 Sussex Drive at around 6:30 a.m. ET with his vehicle, the RCMP said in a statement.

When the impact disabled his vehicle, the man headed to the Rideau Hall greenhouse, where he was “rapidly contained” by RCMP members on patrol, the force said. He was apprehended shortly before 8:30 a.m. without incident and taken into custody for questioning.

CBC News has confirmed the man in custody is Corey Hurren, an active member of the military who serves as a Canadian Ranger.

The Rangers are a component of the Canadian Army Reserve that serves in the remote and coastal regions, typically offering help with national security and public safety operations.

Someone who answered the phone at the Hurren household in Manitoba on Thursday evening confirmed he’d been arrested but said she didn’t want to speak further about the day’s events.

Hurren is described in promotional material for his business as a veteran who recently rejoined the military as a Canadian Ranger. (Facebook)

Hurren ran a business called GrindHouse Fine Foods, which makes meat products. In promotional material for his business, Hurren is described as a Royal Canadian Artillery veteran who recently rejoined the military as a Canadian Ranger. 

He is also a past president of his local Lion’s Club, an active volunteer in his community of Bowsman, north-west of Winnipeg, and his group of Rangers were on call to be part of the military’s assistance with the COVID-19 response.

WATCH | Canadian Armed Forces member armed with long gun arrested at Rideau Hall:

A man from Manitoba arrested on the grounds of Rideau Hall with a long gun and a note is an active member of the Canadian Armed Forces. 1:49

But in his posts on Facebook, he also revealed that the pandemic had taken a toll on his business.

“I’m not sure what will be left of our economy, industries and businesses when this all ends,” he wrote May 26.

Both the RCMP and Defence Minister Harjit Sajjan’s office previously confirmed the man arrested is in the military.

A source told CBC News the man had driven from Manitoba and had a long gun and a note with him. The source — who spoke on the condition they not be named because they were not authorized to discuss the case — did not know the details of the note nor what kind of long gun it was.

Hurren allegedly drove a truck through the gates near 24 Sussex Drive and proceeded on foot to Rideau Hall, not far from Rideau Cottage, where the prime minister lives with his family. (Google, CBC News)

Rideau Hall is the Governor General’s official residence, and the greenhouse is attached to the residence at the back. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and his family also live on the property at Rideau Cottage, not far from the greenhouse.

The Prime Minister’s Office confirmed that the prime minister and his family were not at Rideau Cottage Wednesday night or Thursday morning. RCMP said the Governor General wasn’t present either. 

In a statement to CBC, Gov. Gen. Julie Payette’s office said she had been living on the grounds prior to the pandemic and that all staff were safe.

One of the wrought-iron gates leading to the property was left visibly damaged after the incident and debris could be seen on the ground earlier today.

A robot could be seen examining a black pickup truck just inside the gates at Rideau Hall earlier today. The truck’s airbags also appeared to have been deployed.

Police tape is strung up outside Rideau Hall on Thursday. The intruder was ‘rapidly contained’ according to the RCMP. (Andrew Lee/CBC)

The inside of the truck’s cab appeared to have been packed with boxes and other items.

The robot opened the door and removed several items from the truck, including an orange cooler and boxes.

A robot could be seen examining a black pickup truck on the grounds of Rideau Hall Thursday morning. (Francis Ferland/CBC)

There were also officers inspecting the underside of the truck with mirrors, while others had dogs and were inspecting both the inside of the truck and its contents.

The RCMP said late Thursday afternoon that charges are pending against the man, although they have not yet publicly confirmed his identity.

“Through our members’ vigilance, quick action and successful de-escalation techniques, this highly volatile incident was resolved swiftly and peacefully. I am very proud of all our people and our partners who moved fast and acted decisively to contain this threat,” RCMP deputy commissioner Mike Duheme said in a statement.

Peter Lewis lives near Rideau Hall and was cycling along the Vanier Parkway just before 7 a.m. ET when he saw “a stream” of RCMP vehicles heading toward downtown.

WATCH | Police use a robot to investigate truck: 

RCMP say they arrested an armed man on the grounds of Rideau Hall early Thursday morning. Neither the prime minister nor the Governor General were present at the time. 1:10

He then saw what he described as an armoured police vehicle.

“It’s a little concerning,” he said. “I hope everybody’s all right.”

The grounds at Rideau Hall, as well as the house itself, are normally major tourist attractions in the nation’s capital, where people enjoy picnics on the grass or wander the gardens.

Both have been closed as a result of the coronavirus pandemic.

As of 6:15 p.m. ET, roads outside Rideau Hall were still closed for the investigation.

Officers were seen inspecting the truck and items removed from it, including an orange cooler. (Francis Ferland/CBC)

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

News

Canada adds 302 coronavirus cases on Thursday

Published

on

Canada’s daily coronavirus death toll rose by more than two dozen on Thursday, while 302 new cases were diagnosed across the country.

Though the number of cases and deaths is declining, Thursday’s data brings the national death toll to 8,642. More than 104,000 people have tested positive for the virus, and though more than 63,000 have recovered.

The number of tests administered across the country stood at over 2.9 million, with Ontario leading the country in overall tests completed.

Ontario added the highest number of cases on Thursday at 153, plus an additional 149 cases from Wednesday that were not previously announced due to the Canada Day holiday.

Eight people have died since figures were last released, for a total of 2,680. The province also announced the rollout of its coronavirus contact tracing app would be delayed though no new launch date was provided.

Quebec, the hardest-hit province in the country, added 69 new cases for a total of 55,593. An additional 14 deaths were announced, bringing the province’s total to 5,541.

Alberta, which was also reporting a two-day total, added one death along with 94 cases.

An additional three deaths occurred in B.C. since the province’s last update on Tuesday. The province has also added 24 new COVID-19 cases, including 15 that were not previously announced due to the holiday.

Saskatchewan added 10 cases, four of which were from July 1, along with one additional fatality. Fourteen people have died due to the coronavirus in that province.

Nova Scotia, which is poised to enter a travel “bubble” with the other Atlantic provinces on Friday, counted one new case.

Manitoba, New Brunswick, Newfoundland and Labrador, and P.E.I, along with Yukon and the Northwest Territories, added no additional cases on Thursday.

Nunavut, which remains the only province or territory where the virus has not been formally diagnosed, announced its first presumptive case of the virus.

Nunavut’s chief public health officer said in a statement that an individual at the Mary River Mine, who had travelled to the territory for work, is in isolation and “doing well.”

A case announced in the territory in April was later determined to be a false positive.

Meanwhile, the U.S. added more than 50,000 coronavirus cases, the highest daily total since the pandemic began.

Around the world, 10.9 million people have tested positive for the coronavirus, and nearly 520,000 have succumbed to COVID-19, according to a tally kept by researchers at Johns Hopkins University.

 

Source: global-news

Source link

Continue Reading

Trending