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Canadians use social media to shine light on live music industry left in dark by COVID-19 – Global News

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Canadians who have a passion for the performing arts are taking to social media on Tuesday night to raise awareness about the live events industry that they say has been left on life support by the COVID-19 pandemic.

“We risk not having events,” said Jennifer Hildebrandt, who helped to organize a social media campaign using the hashtags #lightuplive and #lightuplivecanada in Edmonton. “We risk thousands of people being out of work [and] we risk coming out of this pandemic and not having events, not having concerts for people to go back to.

“I think that’s the one thing that a lot of people aren’t grasping right now, is that that’s a very real possibility. Venues are shutting down all across the country. It’s been going on for six months and it’s only going to get worse.”

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READ MORE: ‘The show cannot go on’: Canada’s arts scene takes hit from COVID-19 

Inspired by similar movements in Germany and the United Kingdom, the Light Up Live event on Tuesday asks venues, performers and events workers to take photos of themselves or venues with red lighting and then post them on social media accompanied by the movement’s hashtags.

“I think it will be a fantastic show,” said Christian Zeretzke, an Edmonton freelancer who specializes in rigging and carpentry for theatres. “It’s to raise awareness to the plight of events workers at the moment.

“Bring attention to this. That way we can ask the government to continue giving meaningful support… We’re writing and ready to go back to work because this is what we love to do.”

READ MORE: The show must go on for Edmonton’s arts community amid COVID-19 pandemic

Zeretzke, who came up with the #lightuplivecanada hashtag, said since the pandemic hit in March, he has only had one gig in the arts and has been forced to take other jobs to support himself.

He said from performers, lighting technicians, sound technicians, promoters, florists, security, cleaners and caterers to hospitality groups, an incredible number of people were impacted when live shows came to a screeching halt.

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“The list is mind-boggling how many people it takes to put on an event,” Zeretzke said.

Organizers of the social media movement say the live events sector employs about one-million Canadians, directly and indirectly.

In Alberta, the arts — including live events — contribute to the province’s economic growth as well as quality of life, according to the provincial government.

“This is an additional $1.3 billion in GDP generated, while sustaining nearly 20,000 jobs here in Alberta,” Michael Forian, press secretary for the minister of of Culture, Multiculturalism and Status of Women, told Global News in a statement. “Live experience events also generate economic activity through out-of-town tourism, at an average of $10 million in economic impact for larger events.

“Every $1 million in output from live performance businesses in Alberta generates 17 direct and indirect jobs. When arts and culture thrive, Alberta is well positioned to be seen as a good place to live, invest and do business.”

Over 600 venues across Canada, ranging from arenas to theatres and concert halls, are taking part in Tuesday’s social media event.

READ MORE: Ontario theatre to glow red for national event raising awareness for pandemic-hit live event industry

Zeretzke said even though some venues have been able to reopen in some areas, the limited capacity to accommodate social distancing — something he understands and agrees with — makes it very difficult to break even on a performance.

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“If you have a 100-seat capacity… and 15 of those are technicians and box office staff and actors or whatever, it’s really tough to make a profit off that,” he said.

“We’re really hoping to bring awareness and bring… [more] support from government and from the public for our industry and moving forward, you know, we need to maintain support for gig workers and live event workers,” Hildebrandt said.

“We need an economic recovery plan for our industry.”

READ MORE: Hit hard by COVID-19, Ontario music venues ‘in desperate need of help’ 

People are being asked to begin taking photos and posting them to social media once the sun sets in their region on Tuesday night.

For more information, click here.

–With files from Global News’ Kendra Slugoski

View some tweets with the hashtag #lightuplive below:

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© 2020 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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Student Life Becomes Student Engagement, Center for Creative Media Studies Begins Spring 2021 – Six Mile Post

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Clifton+Puckett%2C+Co-curricular+and+Transitions+Coordinator%2C+works+in+what+will+be+the+Center+for+Creative+Media+Studies.

Olivia Fortner

Clifton Puckett, Co-curricular and Transitions Coordinator, works in what will be the Center for Creative Media Studies.

The Student Life Department on all campuses has been included in budget cuts enforced by the USG this summer. What students know as “Student Life” is being dissolved, but something new is coming.

Faculty and staff are working to give students a fun but valuable experience. The new Student Engagement Department will not only involve students in college life, it is providing ways to relate student’s interests to what they’re learning in class.

“The goal is to have the fun activity but bring in more of the co-curricular activities,” said Jennifer Hicks, director of academic success.

This can help build educational value but be relevant to what students are learning. The activities will relate more to individual pathways.

Hicks said, “Where we’re moving as an institution is toward a student success model.”

Former student life director for the Cartersville campus, Clifton Puckett, has been hired as the co-curricular and transitions coordinator to lead in this new endeavor.

Student Engagement sponsored the 50th anniversary celebration on the Floyd campus. There are virtual workshops and other online resources being made available for students and more to come when everyone is back on campus.

Physical changes are being made on the Floyd campus in what is formerly known as the Student Life Office suite. This area is currently being renovated to make way for a new Center for Creative Media Studies, a program that is anticipated to launch in spring of 2021.

The Center for Creative Media Studies grew out of an idea that assistant professor of journalism and communication, Allison Hattaway, originally pitched to the Dean of Humanities, Jon Hershey, earlier this fall. In an ongoing collaboration with Seth Ingram, department chair of film studies, Hattaway and Ingram have proposed the Center for Creative Media studies as a way of providing access and exposure for GHC students to collaborate creatively in a learning environment that will better prepare them for careers in a global media industry.

“We’ve had overwhelming support from administration and are now working with our partners in Student Engagement and the School of Humanities to organize technological resources and media art training with an emphasis on film, tv, theatre, art and journalism,” said Hattaway.

“Basically, we want the CCMS to be a place where students can come together to be a part of something bigger than themselves and to have an opportunity to implement what they learn in class — it will encourage a hands on work environment for film editing, production, writing, layout and design, podcast production and more. We plan to pull in community partners from local areas so that students have networking opportunities, may participate in mock interviews and begin building a professional portfolio of work samples during their time at GHC,” said Hattaway.

Allen Dutch, Division Chair of Humanities, has a background in media and mass communication.

“I’m really excited about getting students in to do things like podcasts and film making. Theory is good, but you need to get your hands on the programs. Being able to do and create media, that’s the most important part,” Dutch said. “I’m hoping it’s going to provide us a place where students interested in media production can gather together and have an experience.”

Dutch anticipates this center will help students after college.

Dutch said, “When they get a job, they have to have experience. You need to be able to express yourself in different technologies and across multiple platforms.”

This is what is called media convergence in the communications world. Whether it’s podcasts, film or other communications outlets, this CCMS can be used to gain that media convergence experience.

The Six Mile Post and its sister production, “The Student Spin,” will be moving their offices into the lobby area of what was once known as the Student Life office suite. Hattaway will be relocating to John Spranza’s former office and Ingram will move into Hattaway’s former office while taking over the former Six Mile Post office for a film studies classroom space.

“For a while, it’s going to feel a little like ‘apple cart turnover’ as we all relocate and the space is modernized,” said Hattaway, “However, when it’s done, we hope it will be a highlight of the campus and an attractive program for current and future GHC students.”

During a time of budget cuts, campus renovations and new programs might raise a few eyebrows.

“We’re trying to do as much as we can with the space and resources we already have,” said Hattaway, “Essentially, we’re going to see what a new coat of paint, carpet and moving furniture can do first. Eventually, we hope to look into outside grants and funding sources to continue to grow the program.”

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Student Life Becomes Student Engagement, Center for Creative Media Studies Begins Spring 2021 – Six Mile Post

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Clifton+Puckett%2C+Co-curricular+and+Transitions+Coordinator%2C+works+in+what+will+be+the+Center+for+Creative+Media+Studies.

Olivia Fortner

Clifton Puckett, Co-curricular and Transitions Coordinator, works in what will be the Center for Creative Media Studies.

The Student Life Department on all campuses has been included in budget cuts enforced by the USG this summer. What students know as “Student Life” is being dissolved, but something new is coming.

Faculty and staff are working to give students a fun but valuable experience. The new Student Engagement Department will not only involve students in college life, it is providing ways to relate student’s interests to what they’re learning in class.

“The goal is to have the fun activity but bring in more of the co-curricular activities,” said Jennifer Hicks, director of academic success.

This can help build educational value but be relevant to what students are learning. The activities will relate more to individual pathways.

Hicks said, “Where we’re moving as an institution is toward a student success model.”

Former student life director for the Cartersville campus, Clifton Puckett, has been hired as the co-curricular and transitions coordinator to lead in this new endeavor.

Student Engagement sponsored the 50th anniversary celebration on the Floyd campus. There are virtual workshops and other online resources being made available for students and more to come when everyone is back on campus.

Physical changes are being made on the Floyd campus in what is formerly known as the Student Life Office suite. This area is currently being renovated to make way for a new Center for Creative Media Studies, a program that is anticipated to launch in spring of 2021.

The Center for Creative Media Studies grew out of an idea that assistant professor of journalism and communication, Allison Hattaway, originally pitched to the Dean of Humanities, Jon Hershey, earlier this fall. In an ongoing collaboration with Seth Ingram, department chair of film studies, Hattaway and Ingram have proposed the Center for Creative Media studies as a way of providing access and exposure for GHC students to collaborate creatively in a learning environment that will better prepare them for careers in a global media industry.

“We’ve had overwhelming support from administration and are now working with our partners in Student Engagement and the School of Humanities to organize technological resources and media art training with an emphasis on film, tv, theatre, art and journalism,” said Hattaway.

“Basically, we want the CCMS to be a place where students can come together to be a part of something bigger than themselves and to have an opportunity to implement what they learn in class — it will encourage a hands on work environment for film editing, production, writing, layout and design, podcast production and more. We plan to pull in community partners from local areas so that students have networking opportunities, may participate in mock interviews and begin building a professional portfolio of work samples during their time at GHC,” said Hattaway.

Allen Dutch, Division Chair of Humanities, has a background in media and mass communication.

“I’m really excited about getting students in to do things like podcasts and film making. Theory is good, but you need to get your hands on the programs. Being able to do and create media, that’s the most important part,” Dutch said. “I’m hoping it’s going to provide us a place where students interested in media production can gather together and have an experience.”

Dutch anticipates this center will help students after college.

Dutch said, “When they get a job, they have to have experience. You need to be able to express yourself in different technologies and across multiple platforms.”

This is what is called media convergence in the communications world. Whether it’s podcasts, film or other communications outlets, this CCMS can be used to gain that media convergence experience.

The Six Mile Post and its sister production, “The Student Spin,” will be moving their offices into the lobby area of what was once known as the Student Life office suite. Hattaway will be relocating to John Spranza’s former office and Ingram will move into Hattaway’s former office while taking over the former Six Mile Post office for a film studies classroom space.

“For a while, it’s going to feel a little like ‘apple cart turnover’ as we all relocate and the space is modernized,” said Hattaway, “However, when it’s done, we hope it will be a highlight of the campus and an attractive program for current and future GHC students.”

During a time of budget cuts, campus renovations and new programs might raise a few eyebrows.

“We’re trying to do as much as we can with the space and resources we already have,” said Hattaway, “Essentially, we’re going to see what a new coat of paint, carpet and moving furniture can do first. Eventually, we hope to look into outside grants and funding sources to continue to grow the program.”

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Tunisia to investigate Mahdi Organisation over Nice attack -state media – National Post

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Article content

TUNIS — Tunisian authorities have authorized an investigation into whether a group called the Mahdi Organisation exists and carried out the Nice attack, based on social media claims of responsibility, state news agency TAP reported on Friday.

The public prosecutor’s office of the judiciary’s anti-terrorism court has delegated a specialized security unit to carry out the investigation, TAP reported.

It will seek to learn whether the Mahdi organization exists and the veracity of claims made on social media that it was behind Thursday’s attack in the French city, it reported.

The suspect in the attack, in which an assailant shouting “Allahu Akbar” (God is Greatest) beheaded a woman and killed two other people in a church, is Brahim Aouissaoui, a 21-year old Tunisian who had recently emigrated to Europe. (Reporting by Tarek Amara; Editing by John Stonestreet and Catherine Evans)

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