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CBC Windsor September 20 COVID-19 update: 9 new cases and new limits on gatherings – CBC.ca

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The Windsor-Essex County Health Unit reported nine new cases of COVID-19 in the region this weekend.

Six of the new cases are from people having close contact with confirmed cases, two of the cases were acquired in the community and one case is under investigation. 

There are 86 people with the virus currently in self isolation.

According to the health unit, 76 people have died because of the virus and 2,453 cases are resolved. 

As of Sunday, three senior facilities are considered to be in outbreaks, the most recent being Dolce Vita in Windsor which has had an outbreak since September 10. Four residents and two staff members have tested positive for COVID-19 at the facility.

Rosewood Erie Glen in Leamington had one staff member test positive for the virus. New Begninnings, also in Leamington, has had an outbreak since August 10 where 21 residents have tested positive along with seven staff members.

New gathering limits take hold 

On Saturday, the province of Ontario extended its limits on social gatherings to the entire province which were previously imposed in just the Toronto, Peel region and Ottawa areas. 

The decision comes following “alarming growth in the number of COVID-19 cases in the province.”

“Clearly, the numbers are heading in the wrong direction,” the premier said in a release. “We need everyone to follow the public health rules in order to prevent another province wide lockdown, and protect all our citizens, especially the elderly and the vulnerable.”

The limit on indoor gatherings was reduced from 50 people down to ten people, and only 25 people are allowed to gather outside rather than the previous limit of 100 people.

Ontario Premier Doug Ford extended new social gathering limits to the entire province on Saturday. (Chris Young/The Canadian Press)

The new limits, which were made effective immediately, will apply to functions such as, parties, dinners, gatherings, BBQs or wedding receptions held in private residences, backyards, parks and other recreational areas.

Organizers who hold such events face a minimum $10,000 fine.

The rules do not apply to “events or gatherings held in staffed businesses and facilities, such as bars, restaurants, cinemas, convention centres, banquet halls, gyms, places of worship, recreational sporting or performing art events.”

The limits are set to be in place for the next 28 days. 

Potential public exposures

Over the past few weeks, the health unit has flagged several businesses for potential COVID-19 exposures.

In each case, a customer or staff member has tested positive and the health unit wants anybody who may have come into contact to be alerted, self-monitor for symptoms and seek care if symptoms develop. 

The affected businesses and dates include:

  • The Chelsea at 576 Ouellette Ave. on Sept. 6
  • Spagos at 3850 Dougall Ave. on Sept. 6, Sept. 9, Sept. 10
  • Crunch Fitness LaSalle at 5844 Malden Rd. on Sept. 8.

COVID-19 in Sarnia-Lambton

Lambton Public Health has recorded a total of 344 cases of COVID-19.

Two cases are currently active and 317 are resolved.

Twenty-five people have died.

COVID-19 in Chatham-Kent

Chatham-Kent Public Health reported no new cases on Sunday. There have been a total of 366 positive cases, with three active cases in the community. 

Two of those cases are active and 362 people have recovered.

Two people have died from the virus in the region. 

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Flu vaccine available soon at public health clinics – Smithers Interior News

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It’s that time of the year again. Flu shot clinics are starting to be offered in the Bulkley Valley. Avoiding the flu is especially top of mind for most people as the ongoing coronavirus pandemic is still being passed around.

Northwest Medical Health Officer and Acting Northeast Medical Health Officer Dr. Raina Fumerton said this year it is more important than ever to get the flu shot, not only to protect yourself but others around you and healthcare workers.

“There is no COVID vaccine yet,” she said. “But we do have a safe and effective flu vaccine and that will help to take influenza out of the mix of the respiratory season. In the midst of a global pandemic, it is important to get vaccinated against the flu.”

She is expecting more people than normal to roll up their sleeves this fall.

“People are anxious about having multiple circulating viruses around and knowing that there isn’t a vaccine for COVID-19, at least knowing that they can do something to reduce their risk of influenza and help reduce the potential for a co-infection of influenza and Covid at the same time.”

Dr. Fumerton hasn’t heard any predictions about the upcoming flu season and if it will be a banner year or not but also has not been made aware to anticipate anything unusual.

She added there are some ways to stay healthy this season.

“Aside from getting the flu shot, which I recommended anyone who is six months or older do — unless there is some sort of medical contraindication, the best way to protect yourself is get that shot, stay home if you are sick, follow all the health precautions including washing your hands.”

Beginning the week of November 2, the seasonal influenza vaccine will be available through Northern Health during flu clinics to be held in the gymnasium of Smithers Christian Reformed Church on Walnut Street. There are different days depending on age and last name. For a full list of details visit immunizebc.ca

Some pharmacies in Smithers have already started giving out the vaccine.

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Ottawa Public Health flu shot clinics open, new appointments available at 9 a.m. – CTV News

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OTTAWA —
Ottawa residents will be able to roll up their sleeves and get the flu shot starting today at Ottawa Public Health clinics across the city.

The health unit will also release more appointment slots for the flu shot at 9 a.m., after the first seven days were booked within 18 hours last week.

Flu shot clinics will operate by appointment-only at six locations across the city seven-days a week, from 9:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. The flu shot clinic locations are:

  • Notre-Dame-Des-Champs Community Hall, 3659 Navan Road, Orléans
  • Ottawa Public Library-Orleans Branch, 1705 Orléans Blvd., Orléans
  • Lansdowne – Horticulture Building, 1525 Princess Patricia, Glebe
  • Mary Pitt Centre, 100 Constellation Dr., Nepean
  • Chapman Mills Community Building, 424 Chapman Mills Drive, Barrhaven
  • Eva James Memorial Centre, 65 Stonehaven Drive, Kanata

All six flu shot clinic locations will be appointment only, and no walk-up appointments are available.

Last Thursday, the health unit launched the appointment system to book a slot at the six clinics for the first seven days of the flu shot clinics from Oct. 29 to Nov. 4. Nearly 10,000 people booked an appointment for the first seven days within 18 hours.

Approximately 1,500 spaces are available daily at the six flu shot clinic locations. 

Medical Officer of Health Dr. Vera Etches told reporters this week that new appointments will become available to book online starting at 9 a.m. Thursday.

The flu shot clinics will continue until everyone gets the flu shot that wants to get a flu shot.

Ottawa Public Health’s goal is to have 70 per cent of the population receive the flu shot this fall and winter.

For more information about the flu vaccine and to book an appointment, visit www.ottawapublichealth.ca/flu

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Man in his 90s one of two new COVID-19 cases in Kingston region – St. Thomas Times-Journal

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A resident and an employee at an Amherstview seniors and long-term care home are in isolation after Kingston, Frontenac and Lennox and Addington Public Health deemed them positive for COVID-19.

The home, Helen Henderson Care Centre, declared an outbreak on Wednesday as a result. It said in a news release that the resident and staff member are asymptomatic and isolating. No other staff or residents are showing symptoms, the home said.

It said the resident tested positive but the staff member received a negative swab. The home did not explain why public health declared the staff member a positive case. Jenn Fagan, spokesperson for public health, said it is still under investigation why the staff member was deemed positive.

On Wednesday, public health announced two new cases of the virus in the region. One is a man in his 20s, who caught the virus from an already positive close contact, and the other is a man in his 90s. The authority also announced two new recoveries, keeping the active case count at seven.

The man in his 90s is the oldest resident in the region to test positive. The next youngest were nine people in their 70s.

The public health authority is also asking some Kingston Transit riders to monitor themselves for symptoms after a fellow passenger tested positive for the virus. Fagan would not say when the passenger in question tested positive.

“For confidentiality reasons, we are not able to share any identifying information of any of case or potential case outside of the established contact tracing and case management procedures,” she said.

The ill passenger rode Kingston Transit north on Tuesday from 11 a.m. to noon and south between 4 and 5 p.m.; north on Wednesday between 1 and 2 p.m. and south between 6 and 7 p.m.; north on Thursday between 9 and 10 a.m. and south between 2 and 3 p.m.; and north on Friday between noon and 1 p.m. and south between 5 and 6 p.m.

Anyone who rode Route 1 during these times should monitor themselves until Nov. 6, which is 14 days after the last risk of exposure, public health said.

“The individual with a COVID-19 infection wore a face covering during all bus trips — and most likely other riders also did due to the mandatory requirement for face coverings — which can reduce the possibility of infection transmission to others,” public health said.

The Kingston region has had 182 cases of the virus since March of this year. While the cases were first found in a variety of ages, recently, the vast majority have been found in people in their 20s.

At the Kingston, Frontenac and Lennox and Addington Board of Health meeting on Wednesday, Megan Carter, local public health’s research associate in knowledge management, provided modelling that showed what might happen to 10 active cases in 20 days using different doubling periods: 14 days, 12 days and “the worst-case scenario” of seven days.

At our current doubling rate of 14 days, by mid-November there could between five and 47 new cases. If the doubling rate decreased to 12 days, there could be between seven and 56 cases, and if it decreased to seven days, there could be between 19 and 130 active cases.

Carter reiterated that the models show only what “might” happen, but the models are important for public health to prepare for the future.

Dr. Mark Mckelvie of Queen’s University’s department of public health and preventative medicine gave a general rundown of the region’s current COVID-19 status. He told the board of the region’s “chain of protection.”

The chain included the various different community members, including families, businesses, public health, hospitals, long-term care, military, correctional services and many others. He explained that all linked together, everyone needs to fulfil their roles to keep the region in its bubble.

“We really appreciate what people are doing and we thank the community for their co-operation,” Mckelvie said, adding that what everyone is doing is “saving lives.”

He then reminded the board that many of the cases in the region are connected to someone who has travelled, so staying local continues to be important.

The public health dashboard states 26 of the area’s cases caught the virus while traveling, 112 caught the virus from a close contact who had already tested positive, information is still pending for three cases and public health has found no epidemiological link for 41 local cases.

Mckelvie also spoke to the board about public health’s seasonal influenza strategy. He told the board that the National Advisory Committee on Immunization estimates that about 12,200 Canadians are hospitalized and 3,500 die every year of influenza. Last year, 42,537 Canadians tested positive for the flu. Those at the most risk are the elderly, the very young, pregnant women and people with chronic conditions.

While the Kingston, Frontenac and Lennox and Addington area has been above the provincial vaccination rate of about 40 per cent, Dr. Kieran Moore, medical officer of health, has set the goal of vaccinating 60 per cent of the region.

The local public health authority has been allocated 72,000 vaccines by the province to distribute, in addition to the more than 16,700 allocated to local pharmacies.

scrosier@postmedia.com

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