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CDC Now Warns COVID Can Be Spread This Way – Yahoo Canada Shine On

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<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="The CDC updated its guidance about how you could catch COVID-19, saying the disease can be transmitted by aerosols that hang in the air. That means you’ll want to avoid poorly-ventilated indoor spaces where people are doing the following things—read on, and to protect your health and the health of others, don’t miss these Sure Signs You’ve Already Had Coronavirus.” data-reactid=”12″>The CDC updated its guidance about how you could catch COVID-19, saying the disease can be transmitted by aerosols that hang in the air. That means you’ll want to avoid poorly-ventilated indoor spaces where people are doing the following things—read on, and to protect your health and the health of others, don’t miss these Sure Signs You’ve Already Had Coronavirus.

When a Person Sneezes

Ill man wearing grey sweater, yellow hat and spectacles, blowing nose and sneeze into tissue
Ill man wearing grey sweater, yellow hat and spectacles, blowing nose and sneeze into tissue

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="The droplets can really get you when someone sneezes. National Geographic went to a lab at MIT and found scientist Lydia Bourouiba studying sneezes: "Slowed to 2,000 frames per second, video and images from her lab show that a fine mist of mucus and saliva can burst from a person’s mouth at nearly a hundred miles an hour and travel as far as 27 feet."” data-reactid=”25″>The droplets can really get you when someone sneezes. National Geographic went to a lab at MIT and found scientist Lydia Bourouiba studying sneezes: “Slowed to 2,000 frames per second, video and images from her lab show that a fine mist of mucus and saliva can burst from a person’s mouth at nearly a hundred miles an hour and travel as far as 27 feet.”

When a Person Sings

Male And Female Students Singing In Choir At Performing Arts SchoolMale And Female Students Singing In Choir At Performing Arts School
Male And Female Students Singing In Choir At Performing Arts School

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content=""Singing in a room for an extended period of time, in close contact with lots of people and no ventilation—that’s a recipe for disaster," Shelly Miller, a professor at the University of Colorado Boulder, told NPR. "In preliminary research published on July 13, Miller and her fellow researchers found that singers, as well as certain wind and brass instrumentalists, generate respiratory aerosols at high rates. In other words, they spew a lot of droplets into the air when they warble or blow."” data-reactid=”38″>“Singing in a room for an extended period of time, in close contact with lots of people and no ventilation—that’s a recipe for disaster,” Shelly Miller, a professor at the University of Colorado Boulder, told NPR. “In preliminary research published on July 13, Miller and her fellow researchers found that singers, as well as certain wind and brass instrumentalists, generate respiratory aerosols at high rates. In other words, they spew a lot of droplets into the air when they warble or blow.”

When a Person Talks

Two friends watching media content in a smart phoneTwo friends watching media content in a smart phone
Two friends watching media content in a smart phone
<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Yes, just talking can spread COVID-19. "The act of speaking generates droplets that vary in size. Larger droplets pose less of a risk, since they ‘fall quickly to the ground,’ according to the researchers, but smaller ones can dehydrate and linger in the air, essentially acting like an aerosol," reports Health.com, relaying a correspondence published in the New England Journal of Medicine, by researchers from the National Institutes of Health and the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania "This ‘expand[s] the spatial extent of emitted infectious particles,’ the authors said."” data-reactid=”55″>Yes, just talking can spread COVID-19. “The act of speaking generates droplets that vary in size. Larger droplets pose less of a risk, since they ‘fall quickly to the ground,’ according to the researchers, but smaller ones can dehydrate and linger in the air, essentially acting like an aerosol,” reports Health.com, relaying a correspondence published in the New England Journal of Medicine, by researchers from the National Institutes of Health and the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania “This ‘expand[s] the spatial extent of emitted infectious particles,’ the authors said.”

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="RELATED: COVID Mistakes You Should Never Make” data-reactid=”56″>RELATED: COVID Mistakes You Should Never Make

When a Person Breathes

man relaxing after work breathing fresh air sitting at home office desk with laptopman relaxing after work breathing fresh air sitting at home office desk with laptop
man relaxing after work breathing fresh air sitting at home office desk with laptop

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="COVID-19 can be spread even when a person just breathes, says the CDC. A study from the United States National Academy of Sciences, Engineering&amp;Medicine confirmed it: "The study reported that even breathing or talking could possibly release tiny particles (Bioaerosols) carrying the SARS-CoV-2 virus which causes COVID 19," writes author Ramananda Ningthoujam. "The team explained that the virus can stay suspended in the air in the ultrafine mist that is produced when infected people exhale. They recommended wearing masks while going out in public places."” data-reactid=”69″>COVID-19 can be spread even when a person just breathes, says the CDC. A study from the United States National Academy of Sciences, Engineering&Medicine confirmed it: “The study reported that even breathing or talking could possibly release tiny particles (Bioaerosols) carrying the SARS-CoV-2 virus which causes COVID 19,” writes author Ramananda Ningthoujam. “The team explained that the virus can stay suspended in the air in the ultrafine mist that is produced when infected people exhale. They recommended wearing masks while going out in public places.”

When a Person Coughs

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content=""To help stop the spread of germs," says the CDC:” data-reactid=”78″>“To help stop the spread of germs,” says the CDC:

  • Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when you cough or sneeze
  • Throw used tissues in the trash
  • If you don’t have a tissue, cough or sneeze into your elbow, not your hands.”

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="And to get through this pandemic at your healthiest, don’t miss this essential list of 35 Places You’re Most Likely to Catch Coronavirus.&nbsp;” data-reactid=”83″>And to get through this pandemic at your healthiest, don’t miss this essential list of 35 Places You’re Most Likely to Catch Coronavirus

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Alberta sets new high in COVID-19 cases among kids and teens, while testing declines – CBC.ca

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The number of cases of COVID-19 among school-aged children in Alberta has again surged to a new high, while the number of kids and teens being tested continues to decline.

Data from Alberta Health shows the number of new daily cases has continued to rise among five- to nine-year-olds and has again shot up, especially, among 10- to 19-year-olds.

Over the past week on record, an average of 85 cases were recorded per day among school-aged kids and teens.

In-person classes resumed at many Alberta schools on Sept. 1, and for several weeks the number of new daily cases had been on the decline.

That changed during the last week in September, when cases started to rise. The trend has continued through October.


Testing numbers among kids and teens surged in late September to unprecedented heights but have since declined.

For the week ending Oct. 28, there were less than 14,000 kids tested. That’s the second-lowest weekly total since classes resumed in September.

Testing volumes have been generally declining, week after week, throughout October. The proportion of positive tests, meanwhile, has been growing.

In late September, less than one case was being detected for every 100 kids tested.

Over the past week, that’s up to 4.3 cases per 100 kids tested.


The previous peak in cases among school-aged kids came in April. At that time, Dr. Deena Hinshaw, Alberta’s chief medical officer of health, said about eight or nine per cent of tests were coming back positive.

As of Thursday, Hinshaw said there were active alerts (involving a single case) or outbreaks (two or more cases) at 249 schools. That’s roughly 10 per cent of schools in the province.

There were 730 active cases among those who attend these schools.

“So far, in-school transmission has likely occurred in 87 schools,” Hinshaw said Thursday. “Of these, 48 have seen only one new case occur as a result.”

A total of 111 schools were listed as having outbreaks, including 45 on the watch list, meaning they have five or more cases:

  • City Of Airdrie — Coopers Crossing School.
  • City Of Calgary — Lester B. Pearson High School.
  • City Of Calgary — Nelson Mandela High School.
  • City Of Calgary — Canyon Meadows School.
  • City Of Calgary — Ecole de la Rose Sauvage.
  • City Of Calgary — John G. Diefenbaker High School.
  • City Of Calgary — Calgary French & International School.
  • City Of Calgary — St. Francis High School.
  • City Of Calgary — Bishop McNally High School.
  • City Of Calgary — New Heights School and Learning Services.
  • City Of Calgary — Sir Winston Churchill High School.
  • City Of Edmonton — Archbishop O’Leary.
  • City Of Edmonton — Centre High.
  • City Of Edmonton — Ross Sheppard High School.
  • City Of Edmonton — St. Oscar Romero Catholic High School.
  • City Of Edmonton — McNally School.
  • City Of Edmonton — Vimy Ridge.
  • City Of Edmonton — Highlands School.
  • City Of Edmonton — Cardinal Collins High School Academic Centre.
  • City Of Edmonton — Harry Ainlay School.
  • City Of Edmonton — Queen Elizabeth School.
  • City Of Edmonton — Dr. Donald Massey School.
  • City Of Edmonton — Louis St. Laurent.
  • City Of Edmonton — St. Joseph.
  • City Of Edmonton — Edmonton Islamic Academy.
  • City Of Edmonton — Jasper Place School.
  • City Of Edmonton —M.E. LaZerte School.
  • City Of Edmonton — Headway School Society of Alberta.
  • City Of Edmonton — Aurora School.
  • City Of Edmonton — Steinhauer School.
  • City Of Edmonton — St. Francis Xavier.
  • City Of Edmonton — Tipaskan School.
  • City Of Edmonton — St. Bernadette.
  • City Of Edmonton — Kate Chegwin School.
  • City Of Edmonton — Michael A Kostek Elementary School.
  • City Of Edmonton — St. Thomas Aquinas School.
  • City Of Red Deer — Hunting Hills High School.
  • City Of St. Albert — Richard S. Fowler Catholic Junior High School.
  • City Of St. Albert — Elmer S. Gish School.
  • City Of St. Albert — St. Albert Catholic High School.
  • Rocky View County — Khalsa School Calgary Educational Foundation.
  • Strathcona County — Bev Facey Community High School.
  • Strathcona County — Lakeland Ridge School.
  • Town Of Cochrane — RancheView School.
  • Westlock County — Richard F. Staples Secondary School.

You can find a full list of school outbreaks on the Alberta Health website.

Hinshaw said 153 schools that used to be on the list have been removed after they were deemed to no longer have any active cases.

Changes to checklist for student health

Hinshaw announced changes to the daily checklist of student health used by schools and child-care facilities across the province — as well as many parents.

“The first change is that we are removing runny nose and sore throat from the list of symptoms that require mandatory isolation for children,” she said.

In the past week, Hinshaw said more than 3,400 kids and youth tested for COVID-19 reported having a sore throat, and, of those, roughly 700 had a sore throat as their only symptom. Among those 700, less than one per cent tested positive.

Similarly, more than 3,300 kids with a runny nose were tested, and about 600 had a runny nose but no other symptoms. Of those 600, less than 0.5 per cent tested positive for COVID-19.

“This shows us that these symptoms by themselves are very poor indicators of whether a child has the virus,” Hinshaw said.

“I want to be clear that this change is only for those who have not had a known exposure,” she added.

Hinshaw said the second change is a “shift towards a more targeted checklist,” which will take into account the total number of symptoms a child has.

There will be no change if a child has any of the “core isolation symptoms,” which include cough, fever, shortness of breath or loss of taste or smell. Kids with these symptoms must still isolate for 10 days or have a negative test result and resolved symptoms before resuming their previous activities.  

The change, which takes effect Monday, will apply to all other symptoms. If a child has only one such symptom, Hinshaw said “they should stay home and monitor for 24 hours.”

“If their symptom is improving after 24 hours, testing is not necessary and they can return to normal activities when they feel well enough. However, if the child has two or more of the symptoms on the list, then testing is recommended and they should stay home until the symptoms go away or they test negative for COVID-19.”

The changes align Alberta’s approach with those of B.C., Ontario and Quebec, Hinshaw said.

She acknowledged “it is also another change in a year that has been full of other changes already.”

“I know that most parents and child-care operators are used to the current symptom list and this new list may be a little challenging at first, as parents and operators adjust,” she said.

“But these changes will help get Albertans under 18 back into classrooms and child-care settings more quickly, while still keeping each other safe.”

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Canadian Burial Insurance

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Canadian burial insurance

Most of us don’t want to think about our funerals, but no matter how much we neglect the inevitable, the reality is that somebody will be responsible for the expenses when the time comes. The question is, will it be our mourning loved ones that pay the bill, or will we prepare and buy funeral insurance to cover those expenses so that they have one less issue to worry about.

Funeral insurance covers your loved ones by paying funeral and service fees, so they don’t have to. Many funeral insurance plans are between $5000 and $20,000 in value and are open to People of any age, so it’s never too late to start making the requisite arrangements.

One of the best things about a funeral insurance policy is that they’re inexpensive and open to all. Funeral insurance rates are charged every month, so the payment is distributed over one year instead of appearing all at once every six or twelve months. Also, a funeral insurance package does not require a medical test, so those in high-risk groups, such as smokers, or with pre-existing medical conditions will still apply.

Even without these incentives, the fact is that funeral rates are continually increasing. Much of our new life insurance, if any, is not enough to cover medical costs, pending loans, and funeral expenses. However, with an additional funeral insurance policy, we can be confident that our loved ones have the resources to make a pleasant farewell.

Funeral insurance provides coverage and tells those we love that we have taken care of them enough to arrange and save them from the needless burden paying for our funeral. But, more than that, burial insurance can also be used to cover extra medical expenses or other bills accrued, so that debt collectors will not hurt our families at one of the saddest moments of their lives. Funeral insurance can also leave anything behind to ease their loss: college income, home repairs, or living expenses. And the recipient of the funeral insurance policy does not have to pay any taxes on the money.

Today, many people are hesitant to get insurance plans because they don’t want to be insulted by salesmen or wait for the approval. This is not an issue with funeral insurance. Interested individuals can request a funeral insurance application online without negotiating with a qualified sales force or disclosing personal information to strangers. Also, the funeral insurance application is reviewed promptly and released quickly.

The reality is that funeral insurance is the right decision for everyone and everyone because we never know when our time is coming. Funeral insurance is easy to obtain and afford. Funeral insurance will cover our funeral costs, hospital expenses, and other obligations while also providing our loved ones with some tax-free money to support them through this challenging period. Funeral insurance also allows us the peace of mind to realize that we have relieved the pressure, worry, and sorrow of our loved ones by taking action to plan for the future. The funeral insurance policy is our last way to say, “I love you.”

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Corbella: Save the fearmongering for Halloween and follow the science on COVID-19 – Calgary Herald

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Article content continued

“The choice is not between implementing another lockdown or letting COVID-19 run unimpeded. Instead, we must make it as easy and safe as possible for Albertans to live with this virus for the foreseeable future.”

We do that, she says, by “implementing targeted measures when needed, such as the 15-person limit on social gatherings announced on Monday” for Calgary and Edmonton, and not a repeat of across-the board lockdowns that lead to so much despair and hardship.

Stephen Avenue Mall was quiet in downtown Calgary on Thursday, March 19, 2020. The COVID-19 pandemic has left many businesses closed and office workers at home. Photo by Gavin Young/Postmedia

Hinshaw says learning from other jurisdictions also helps. As a result, there are some new rules for parents to follow when it comes to their school-aged children attending school.

Already, angry, hateful tweets are popping up on Twitter attacking Hinshaw and the provincial government for this.

The first change includes removing runny nose and sore throat from the list of symptoms that require mandatory isolation for children.

Hinshaw says in the past week, more than 3,400 children and youth reporting a sore throat were tested for COVID-19. Of those, just a little over 700 had a sore throat as their only symptom. “Less than one per cent of those tests were positive,” she said.

“Similarly, more than 3,300 children were tested with a runny nose, with only 601 of whom having a runny nose and nothing else. Less than 0.5 per cent of those tested positive for COVID-19.

“This shows us that these symptoms by themselves are very poor indicators of whether a child has the virus.

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