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Champagne urges Canadians to check travel advisories as coronavirus spreads – CBC.ca

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Air Canada is extending its suspension of flights between Canada and mainland China until April as the number of coronavirus cases — and the number of countries affected — continues to grow.

The country’s largest domestic and international airline announced Tuesday that service to Beijing and Shanghai will be cancelled until April 10. The company initially grounded flights for the month of February after the federal government issued an advisory warning against non-essential travel to China.

“Air Canada will continue to monitor this evolving situation closely in consultation with the Public Health Agency of Canada, Transport Canada and Global Affairs and will adjust its schedule as appropriate,” says a statement from the company.

Air Canada normally operates direct flights to Beijing and Shanghai from Toronto, Montreal and Vancouver.

The carrier also is extending the suspension of its daily Toronto-Hong Kong flights until April 30 due to reduced demand, and says it will accommodate customers already booked on those flights on its non-stop Vancouver-Hong Kong flights.

Asked in the House of Commons Tuesday if the government has done enough to screen potentially infected individuals entering the country, Health Minister Patty Hajdu insisted Canada has imposed “strict” measures. But she noted the coronavirus has now spread to at least 35 countries — including some that may not have the capacity to properly diagnose it.

“Those measures are less effective and it’s time to turn our attention and our resources to making sure we’re prepared on the domestic stage,” she said.

Hajdu said there are not many cases in Canada now, but that could change at any time.

Hajdu said the messaging at airports will broaden to advise all international travellers on what they should do if they experience symptoms. But she said passenger screening and containment efforts are now less relevant than domestic efforts to delay and mitigate an outbreak.

Hajdu said Canadians in Iran and other affected countries will receive consular support, but suggested that evacuating people is now unlikely.

“We should be clear that repatriation efforts are limited at this point. It’s difficult at this point to commit to an ongoing repatriation process. You have to remember that it takes a lot of resources and the resources have to be focused in terms of our domestic response,” she said. “It’s important for Canadians to realize this may cause disruptions in their lives.”

On Monday, Tam said Canadian officials are preparing to respond to a possible pandemic in the event there is a community outbreak domestically. The World Health Organization (WHO) has declared the epidemic a global health emergency, but has not yet called it a pandemic.

Earlier today, Foreign Affairs Minister François-Philippe Champagne urged Canadians planning international trips to keep a close eye on government travel advisories as the coronavirus outbreak spreads.

Nations around the world have been imposing strict travel restrictions in an attempt to contain the virus’s spread.

On his way into a cabinet meeting this morning in Ottawa, Champagne called the outbreak a “dynamic” situation and said Canadians with travel plans should take precautions.

“Make sure you check before you go. That’s the best advice I can give,” he said.

“We’ve seen new places where the coronavirus has expanded — in South Korea, we saw in Italy today not only the north of Italy but Sicily and Tuscany. We’ve seen what’s happening in Iran.”

Global Affairs Canada (GAC) has heightened its travel advisory for South Korea, where nearly 1,000 cases have been reported. The department is now warning travellers to exercise a “high degree of caution” in travelling to the country due to the spread of the novel coronavirus.

More than 320 cases have been reported in Italy. More than 80,000 cases have been reported globally.

GAC’s advisory for travel to Italy was updated Tuesday, warning travellers to “practise special precautions.”

“COVID-19 can spread from person to person, and in Italy cases have been confirmed in multiple regions in the north of the country. Sustained community spread of the virus is being reported. This means it is unknown how or where some people became infected, and the spread is ongoing,” the advisory reads.

A couple is seen on Tuesday on the subway in Milan. Italy is facing a growing number of coronavirus cases. (Yara Nardi/Reuters)

The advisory says good medical care is widely available in Italy, but services could be limited in rural areas and doctors and nurses may not be able to communicate in English or French.

Medical treatment for life-threatening emergencies and emergency room treatment is free of charge in Italy, but hospitals charge up-front for any convalescence or follow-up care, the advisory reads.

Risk remains low in Canada

Canada’s Chief Public Health Officer Theresa Tam issued a statement today saying that the risk posed by the coronavirus in Canada remains low.

She also confirmed that the 195 people who were under quarantine at the Canadian Forces Base in Trenton after an evacuation flight from China have been released.

The group arrived two weeks ago on the second government-chartered flight from Wuhan, China, and have shown no symptoms throughout the quarantine period.

“As a result, they pose no risk to others and can return to their usual activities,” Tam said in the statement.

“I would like to thank the repatriated Canadians and their families for their patience, cooperation and contribution to public health. They have been through a stressful experience and I urge everyone to treat them with respect and compassion.”

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Saskatchewan warns of elevated monkeypox risk through 'anonymous sexual contact' – Niagara Falls Review

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REGINA – Saskatchewan’s health-care delivery agency is warning there’s an elevated risk of acquiring monkeypox through anonymous sexual contact, and it’s expanding vaccine eligibility to adults 18 years and older who are close contacts or deemed higher risk for exposure.

The chief medical officer of health told reporters during a news conference Saturday that monkeypox cases in the province remain low — so far only three have been confirmed.

But Dr. Saqib Shahab says if people meet the risk criteria and have concerns, they should call the province’s 811 HealthLine for advice on testing, as well as on obtaining a pre-exposure vaccination.

The Saskatchewan Health Authority issued a news release saying the warning about catching monkeypox through anonymous sexual contact is due to recent known cases.

It adds information reported to public health, related to travel into and out of province, has prompted the alert.

Shahab says Saskatchewan wants to do everything it can to prevent a surge in cases.

“I think with travel interactions throughout Canada in the summer, I think this risk was bound to change for us in Saskatchewan and that’s why we are now really opening up the vaccine, not just for post-exposure prophylaxis, but for pre-exposure as well, for the very targeted group that we’ve identified,” Shahab said at the news conference.

“Obviously we don’t want over-testing happening, but in the right context, I think it’s important to seek testing, exactly for the reason that we don’t want to miss cases.”

So far, he said there have been no cases in Saskatchewan where a history of exposure hasn’t been identified. Additional vaccine doses have been ordered now that the province has expanded eligibility, he noted.

Monkeypox, which comes from the same family of viruses that cause smallpox, has been endemic in parts of central and west Africa for decades and was not known to trigger large outbreaks beyond the continent until May.

It causes fever, headache, swollen lymph nodes and lethargy, followed by the development of a rash over a person’s body. It spreads through close, personal, often skin-to-skin contact, touching bodily fluids or lesions of a person who is sick with the disease or exposure to contaminated objects such as bed linens or clothing.

The Public Health Agency of Canada says the majority of domestic cases are among men who reported intimate sexual contact with other men. Having multiple sexual partners may increase one’s overall risk, but the agency says the risk of exposure is not exclusive to any group or setting.

The number of Canadian monkeypox cases surpassed 1,000 just this week, though there are early signs the virus may now be spreading at a slower rate.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Aug. 13, 2022.

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Sask Health alerts public of elevated risk of acquiring monkeypox – Global News

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The Saskatchewan Health Authority is alerting the public of an elevated risk of acquiring monkeypox through anonymous sexual contact.

Recent known cases have been associated with this form of transmission, and information reported to public health related to travel in and out of the province has prompted the alert.

Read more:

18+ eligible for 2nd COVID-19 vaccine booster in Saskatchewan on Monday

“We’ve have been following the global monkeypox outbreak very closely for the last five months now,” said Dr. Saqib Shahab, the Chief Medical Health Officer for Saskatchewan.

“We think now there is a higher risk that we may see ongoing transmission in Saskatchewan.”

There are three confirmed cases of monkeypox in the province. Shahab said the cases so far have been from people exposed outside of Saskatchewan, however there are now people who have been exposed inside the province.

“We have evidence of exposures happening in Saskatchewan,” Shahab said. “In many cases through anonymous sexual contacts. This is very similar to what has been seen in other provinces in Canada and internationally.”

Monkeypox is a rare viral illness that causes fever, headache, swollen lymph nodes and lethargy, followed by the development of a rash over a person’s body. Monkeypox does not spread easily from person to person. It is spread through:

  • Close, personal, often skin-to-skin contact.
  • Touching bodily fluids or lesions of a person who is sick with the disease.
  • Exposure to contaminated objects such as bed linens or clothing.

Anyone who believes they have been exposed to monkeypox can contact Healthline 811 to determine if they are considered at risk or eligible for a vaccine.

Read more:

Saskatchewan child care fees going down 70% starting Sept. 1

Eligibility for the monkeypox vaccine has been expanded to adults 18 years and older who are close contacts or deemed higher risk for exposure. Referrals are available through 811.

“With travel, with interactions in summer, this risk was bound to change,” Shahab said. “Now we are really opening up the vaccine for not just post-exposure… but for pre-exposure as well with the groups we have identified.”

The province has ordered additional vaccines to help with both pre-exposure and post-exposure, and plan to order even more if the demand increases.

Shahab hopes with the increase in vaccines and awareness of the symptoms, transmission can stay low in the province.

“We are really hopeful both in Saskatchewan and Canada that through all these measures of raising awareness so people are aware of symptoms and the can isolate, seek testing and now seek pre exposure vaccines, we really hope we can control this outbreak,” he said.

If you have recently been in contact with an individual suspected or confirmed with monkeypox and develop fever or other symptoms of illness, you should call HealthLine 811 or consult a health-care provider immediately.


Click to play video: 'About 50% of monkeypox vaccine supply used, Canada passes 1,000 cases: Tam'



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About 50% of monkeypox vaccine supply used, Canada passes 1,000 cases: Tam


About 50% of monkeypox vaccine supply used, Canada passes 1,000 cases: Tam

© 2022 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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Worse Vascular Outcomes Found in Patients With Asthma – AJMC.com Managed Markets Network

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Patients with symptoms of asthma, regardless of physiological confirmation, experienced worse vascular outcomes and greater cardiovascular risk, which may be due to short-acting beta agonist (SABA) use, according to the results of a recent study.

Individuals with a clinical history of asthma had lower endothelial function than healthy controls, regardless of whether participants had physiological confirmation of the disease.

Study results, which were published in Respiratory Medicine, also showed that that participants with asthma who regularly used short-acting beta agonist (SABA) medications had increased arterial stiffness than those who did not use SABA.

Researchers aimed to compare markers of cardiovascular risk, specifically endothelial function, arterial stiffness, and systemic inflammation, among those with confirmed asthma, unconfirmed asthma, and healthy controls. Researchers also aimed to investigate the effect of SABA use on these vascular outcomes.

This cross-sectional study included 26 patients with confirmed asthma, 15 patients with unconfirmed asthma, and 26 healthy controls all recruited from the Edmonton, Canada metropolitan area. All participants in the study were aged between 18 to 45 years and current nonsmokers.

Participants completed a pulmonary function test and evaluation for asthma. Physiological evidence of asthma was defined as a clinical history of symptoms such as recurrent wheezing, cough, and/or chest tightness. Physiological evidence also includes a reversibility in forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) of ≥12% and 200mL, a ≥20% reduction in FEV1 after a methacholine challenge, or a ≥10% reduction in FEV1 after an exercise challenge.

Participants were labeled with confirmed asthma if they had a clinical history and physiological evidence of asthma. Those labelled with unconfirmed asthma had a clinical history but no physiological evidence of asthma. Healthy controls had no evidence of asthma. Researchers compared endothelial function, arterial stiffness, and systemic inflammation between these three groups of participants.

Researchers assessed participants’ endothelial function as flow-mediated dilation (FMD) after 5 minutes of supra-systolic forearm occlusion distal to the imaging site. A 1% decreased in FMD correlates with a 7% increase in cardiovascular risk.

Participants’ arterial stiffness was assessed using pulse wave velocity (PWV). PWV was measured between the carotid and radial artery. A 1 m/s increased in PWV corresponds to about a 16% increase in cardiovascular risk.

Systematic inflammation was assessed by C-reactive protein (CRP) levels in serum after venous blood was collected from the participants. CRP levels have been linked with cardiovascular risk, even for those without underlying cardiovascular morbidity.

Endothelial function was significantly lower in both confirmed and unconfirmed asthma groups than compared to healthy controls. There was no significant difference in FMD between the confirmed and unconfirmed asthma groups.

There was no significant difference found in arterial stiffness and systemic inflammation among both asthma groups and the controls.

Participants with bot confirmed and unconfirmed asthma were grouped together and then split based on SABA use. SABA was used by 19 participants and not used by 22 participants in the last year. There was no significant difference between in endothelial function and systemic inflammation between these two groups. However, SABA users had a significantly higher arterial stiffness by an average of 1.5 m/s than those not using SABA.

Limitations of this study include the small sample size and the inability to account for seasonal fluctuations in asthma symptoms due to the cross-sectional design. Also, this study did not adjust for other variables that can impact vascular outcomes.

Reduced vascular function was seen in participants with asthma regardless of physiological confirmation of asthma, suggesting that the link between asthma and cardiovascular risk may be due to factors other than asthma pathophysiology and perhaps due to asthma symptomatology, the researchers noted. The researchers also noted that this study highlights the need for proper asthma management to avoid inappropriate SABA use in patients with unconfirmed physiological asthma.

Reference

Henry SL, Moore LE, Brotto AR, Rowland S, Fuhr D, Stickland MK. Systemic vascular health is comprised in both confirmed and unconfirmed asthma. Respir Med. 2022;200. doi:10.1016/j.rmed.2022.106932

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