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Charlottetown resident named president of Canadian Space Agency

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CHARLOTTETOWN, P.E.I. —

A former high-ranking official with Veterans Affairs Canada is taking over the top job at the country’s space agency.

On Friday, the federal government announced Lisa Campbell has been appointed as president of the Canadian Space Agency, taking over from Sylvain Laporte who has filled that role since 2015.

With the appointment, Campbell leaves her position as associate deputy minister of Veterans Affairs Canada.

She has lived in Charlottetown since 2018.

Prior to that job, Campbell was assistant deputy minister of defence and marine procurement where she led the organization that buys Canada’s military and marine equipment.

She was also appointed by the clerk of the Privy Council of Canada as UPEI’s deputy minister university champion.

Campbell previously worked at Canada’s competition authority as senior deputy commissioner where she reviewed mergers and business conduct.

The Canadian Space Agency is the federal agency responsible for managing all of Canada’s civil space-related activities.

Innovation, Science and Industry Minister Navdeep Bains said Campbell has the experience and abilities to move the space agency forward on future explorations.

“Her experience in defence procurement will hold her in good stead as she takes over some of the most important procurements for the space sector,” he said.

Source:- Cape Breton Post

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Artist Mark Johnson to Paint Alligator That Attacked Him in Port St. Lucie, Florida – Newser

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(Newser)

Mark Johnson remembers his attacker in vivid detail. “He had green eyes,” he says. “The teeth were pearly white, no stain or anything.” Now, the Florida artist wants to paint the perp—an 8-foot-long alligator that mauled him earlier this month. The attack in Port St. Lucie took place on Sept. 13 while Johnson was taking his dog, Rex, on a morning walk on the shoreline of the canal in his neighborhood. Suddenly, the gator emerged. “He started clamping down really good above my knee, and my shoe was sticking out the base of his jaw,” Johnson, 61, tells Patch.com, adding that there was no makeshift weapon, like a stick or rock, he could use to get the gator off him. Afraid the aggressive reptile might go after Rex, Johnson gave his dog the command to run home, then scrambled to try to break the gator’s grip.

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Johnson, who believes he was seconds away from being dragged into the water, finally broke free by jamming his fingers into the gator’s eyes, causing the animal to release him. An injured Johnson hobbled home, and when his wife—who’d been enjoying a cup of coffee outside and saw the creature swimming in the canal—spotted him coming down the road, she yelled out, “Did you see the gator?” Johnson’s reply: “Yeah, he bit me.” He ended up with about five dozen stitches for his puncture wounds on his leg, plus another five on his finger, which he sliced while sticking it in the gator’s eye socket, per WJXT. Now Johnson has a 30-by-40 canvas on order, which he plans on turning into a “self-portrait” documenting his ordeal, per the Guardian. He’s not sure if he’ll keep it as a reminder or sell it. (Read more alligator stories.)

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New Shark Research Tracks Movements of Smooth Hammerheads – DivePhotoGuide.com

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By Ian Bongso-Seldrup, September 21, 2020 @ 02:00 AM (EST)
Source: Science Daily

With overfishing driving many hammerhead species closer to the brink of extinction, a team of researchers has been focusing on determining the migration patterns of smooth hammerhead sharks (Sphyrna zygaena) in the western Atlantic Ocean in an effort to identify areas and times for management action to help in building back the depleted species.

The team tagged juvenile hammerheads off the US Mid-Atlantic coast using fin-mounted satellite tags and tracked the animals for up to 15 months. The tags reported the sharks’ movement patterns in near real time via a satellite link to the researchers.

“Getting long-term tracks was instrumental in identifying not only clear seasonal travel patterns, but importantly, also the times and areas where the sharks were resident in between their migrations,” said Ryan Logan, first author of the paper published in Frontiers in Marine Science. Logan is a PhD student at Nova Southeastern University’s Guy Harvey Research Institute and SOSF SRC and the Save Our Seas Foundation Shark Research Center (SOSF SRC).

Logan and his coworkers found that the sharks migrate between two seasonally resident areas: coastal waters off New York in the summer and off North Carolina in the winter. Identifying these habitats is vital for ultimately designating the areas as “Essential Fish Habitat”—with the accompanying limitations on fishing and development.

The high-resolution data also revealed that the hammerheads spent a lot of time in the Mid-Atlantic Shark Area (MASA) in the winter, starting in December. The MASA zone is closed to bottom longline fishing between January 1st and July 31st to protect dusky sharks, so beginning the closure of the zone in December would further reduce the fishing mortality of juvenile smooth hammerheads.   

Check out the tracks of various shark species, including smooth hammerheads, at Guy Harvey Research Institute’s dedicated website.

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Venus is a Russian planet — say the Russians – CNN Philippines

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(CNN)— No longer confined to territories here on Earth, Russia has now staked its claim on Venus, saying it is a “Russian planet.”

This week, Dmitry Rogozin, head of the Russian space corporation Roscosmos, revealed that the country plans to send its own mission to Venus in addition to “Venera-D,” the planned joint mission with the US, the Russian state news agency TASS reported.

Rogozin was addressing reporters at the HeliRussia 2020 exhibition, an international expo of the helicopter industry in Moscow.

“Resuming Venus exploration is on our agenda,” he told reporters Tuesday.

“We think that Venus is a Russian planet, so we shouldn’t lag behind,” he said.

“Projects of Venus missions are included in the united government program of Russia’s space exploration for 2021-2030.”

The statement came the day after scientists revealed that a gas on Earth called phosphine had also been detected in the atmosphere of Venus.

Venus is similar in size to Earth and is our closest planetary neighbor, but it spins backward compared to other planets.

The study authored by Cardiff University professor Jane Greaves and her colleagues was published Monday in the journal Nature Astronomy.

The discovery of phosphine on Venus elevates it to an area of interest worth exploring in our solar system alongside the ranks of Mars and “water world” moons like Enceladus and Europa, Seager said.

“Our hoped-for impact in the planetary science community is to stimulate more research on Venus itself, research on the possibilities of life in Venus’ atmosphere, and even space missions focused to find signs of life or even life itself in the Venusian atmosphere,” Seager said.

According to the European Space Agency, the Russians do have significant experience when it comes to Venus.

Its website states: “Between 1967-1984 Venusian studies carried out in Russia were at the forefront of international research into this planet.

“Since then, Russia has still preserved its unique expertise in designing and developing landing craft for Venus and continues to define scientific tasks for those craft.”

This story was first published on CNN.com, “Venus is a Russian planet — say the Russians.”

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