Connect with us

Economy

Charting the Global Economy: U.S. Jobs Puts Bright Cap on Week – Yahoo Canada Finance

Published

on


Charting the Global Economy: U.S. Jobs Puts Bright Cap on Week

View photos

(Bloomberg) — The U.S. unemployment rate fell more than expected in August, offering good news after troubling signs in Europe’s economy earlier in the week.

The fourth straight monthly improvement in the labor market included a 1.37 million gain in nonfarm payrolls, though the pace of job growth is moderating. The jobless rate dropped to 8.4%. There are still risks, with Congress in stalemate over another stimulus package and companies continuing to announce job cuts.

Europe’s jobs market also looks shaky, with the euro-area recovery losing steam and the inflation rate falling below zero. In the U.K., central bankers are hinting that they’ll do more to keep their recoveries on track.

Here are some of the charts that appeared on Bloomberg this week, offering insight into the latest developments in the global economy:

World

Following signs of a downturn in previous weeks, the latest readings show activity stabilizing across most advanced economies, though still some way from pre-Covid levels, according to Bloomberg Economics. With activity at just two-thirds of pre-virus levels, the U.S. is the worst performing of the advanced economies BE is tracking.

The world is hurtling toward an unprecedented hunger crisis. As many as 132 million more people than previously projected could go hungry in 2020, and this year’s gain may be more than triple any increase this century.

U.S.

The headline U.S. jobs numbers on Friday sent the dollar and Treasury yields higher. But behind that was was more troubling figure: the number of permanent job losers rose by more than half a million to 3.41 million, the highest level since 2013. It points to the ongoing business closures, bankruptcies and investment cuts across the country.

Hunger is surging in the heart of the U.S. breadbasket, showing just how dire the problem has become during the pandemic.

Europe

There’s a tax trap looming for Europe’s cross-border commuters and the companies that depend on them, if working from home becomes permanent following the pandemic.

The U.K. economy will struggle to avoid scarring from the current downturn, though the hit could be smaller than after previous recessions, according to Bloomberg Economics.

Asia

The blow from Covid-19 has put Chinese gross domestic product on track to grow just 2% in 2020, based on Bloomberg Economics’ projections. This is strong by global comparison, but the slowest on record since China began reforms in the late 1970s. Expect more slowdown in the decades ahead.

While many Asian central banks have spent the year slashing interest rates and boosting money supply in response to the economic havoc wrought by the pandemic, deflation fears still managed to crop up across parts of the region.

Emerging Markets

The single biggest risk to South Africa’s economic outlook remains the availability of electricity, according to Bloomberg Economics. It’s a binding constraint that continues to hold back productivity and investment growth. Without it, the country’s growth potential will remain stuck around 1%, even if progress is made in other areas.

Job losses in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic in the United Arab Emirates are getting worse even as much of the rest of the Gulf’s second-biggest economy is starting to heal.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com” data-reactid=”47″>For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Subscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.” data-reactid=”48″>Subscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.

©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Economy

Trudeau Poised to Announce Three-Pillar Economic Recovery Plan – Yahoo Canada Finance

Published

on


Trudeau Poised to Announce Three-Pillar Economic Recovery Plan

(Bloomberg) — Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is set to unveil a new plan to try to contain the spread of Covid-19 and recharge Canada’s pandemic-battered economy, according to a senior government official.

The broad themes in this week’s so-called Throne Speech — which outlines his government’s priorities — will be a focus on the immediate task of tackling the coronavirus, a medium-term commitment to support Canadians through the pandemic and a “resiliency agenda” to spur recovery and reconstruction.

Trudeau’s agenda won’t establish budget targets, which will be left for Finance Minister Chrystia Freeland to detail later this year in a fiscal update, the official said, speaking on condition they not be identified because the document isn’t yet public.

Wednesday’s speech is one of the most anticipated in Trudeau’s five years in power, with questions mounting over how his governing Liberals plan to navigate their next policy steps amid surging Covid-19 case numbers and soaring budget deficits.

The prime minister needs to balance the need for more health-care spending with pledges to engineer an ambitious and green post-pandemic agenda. And he needs to do it without further eroding the nation’s financial credibility after one major credit-rating agency downgraded Canada’s debt.

“This government has set certain expectations and now the pressure is on them to meet their own expectations,” pollster Shachi Kurl, executive director of the Angus Reid Institute, said by phone.

Parliamentary Reset

Health care spending will be the first pillar for the economic recovery, the official said. This includes spending for vaccines, Covid-19 testing and support to localize outbreaks to maintain control over a resurgence of cases.

The second will be a pledge to provide financial support to Canadians who are struggling economically due to the pandemic, with a focus on shifting people back into the workforce.

Economic recovery and reconstruction efforts are the third pillar. This will include a pledge to help foster green investments, resolve major health issues such as long-term care for seniors and bolster support systems for the most vulnerable, like low-income women and minorities.

Trudeau has spoken publicly about plans to overhaul the employment insurance system, provide support for childcare and long-term care and build a cleaner economy through climate initiatives like retrofitting buildings and electric vehicles.

The prime minister suspended all parliamentary business last month after a public rift with his previous finance chief prompted Freeland’s appointment, claiming he needed a new legislative slate in order to move ahead with a “bold” new spending plan to help drive the recovery.

Canada has already budgeted C$380 billion ($289 billion) in new debt this year as a response to the downturn, spending that will likely drive the federal government’s debt to about 50% of economic output, from 31% last year. That’s triggered a backlash from business groups and economists, who are calling on Trudeau to commit to specific new debt targets to impose discipline on the budgeting process.

To assuage those concerns, Freeland vowed last week to preserve Canada’s reputation for sound fiscal management as her government considers the next steps to drive the recovery.

Trudeau is prepared to spend whatever it takes to combat the immediate impacts of Covid-19, given the emergency expenditures will only be temporary, the official said. Any future spending deemed structural, however, would be within new “fiscal tracks” that will be laid out by the finance minister later this year.

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com” data-reactid=”34″>For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com

<p class="canvas-atom canvas-text Mb(1.0em) Mb(0)–sm Mt(0.8em)–sm" type="text" content="Subscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.” data-reactid=”35″>Subscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.

©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Economy

Swedish government promises $12 billion to kick-start economy in 2021 budget – The Journal Pioneer

Published

on


By Simon Johnson

STOCKHOLM (Reuters) – Sweden’s government will pump 105 billion crowns ($12 billion) into the economy in 2021 through tax cuts and spending in a record giveaway aimed at getting the economy back on its feet after the coronavirus pandemic-induced slump.

Sweden’s economy will shrink around 4.6% this year, the minority coalition said its budget on Monday, a milder hit than many other European countries, some of which are being forced to re-impose COVID restrictions after a surge in new cases.

“Economic policy is going into a new phase,” Finance Minister Magdalena Andersson told reporters. “It is about a record-large budget to restart the Swedish economy: 100 billion so that we can work our way out of the crisis.”

The Social Democrat and Green coalition said the budget would focus would be on boosting jobs, welfare and supporting the switch to a carbon-free future.

Most measures, agreed with two small, centre-right parties which help keep the coalition in power, were already known.

Individuals and companies will get a tax cut and local authorities and welfare services more cash while around 10 billion crowns will go toward fighting climate change.

The budget is expected to create around 75,000 jobs.

LONG TERM WINNERS

While Sweden looks to have got off relatively lightly economically in the short term, analysts caution that it is too early to pick the longer term winners and losers from the pandemic.

Much will depend on how government largesse, including Europe’s 750 billion euro recovery find, is spent.

Sweden also faces a number of structural challenges, not least in the labour market where unemployment among young people and immigrants is uncomfortably high.

A dysfunctional housing market also threatens long-term economic stability while funding the country’s comprehensive welfare model as society as a whole ages will require a huge increase in productivity.

The government has promised to keep the taps open, at least for the next few years – tax cuts and spending will boost the economy by 85 billion in 2022.

But with a general election due that year, longer term policies remain unclear. The last national vote resulted an a virtual stalemate between the centre-left and centre-right blocs and there is little evidence that voters are any clearer about what they want now.

(Reporting by Simon Johnson, additional reporting by Johan Ahlander; Editing by Niklas Pollard and Toby Chopra)

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Economy

US household wealth hits record even as economy struggles – CKPGToday.ca

Published

on


By Canadian Press

Sep 21, 2020 9:07 AM

WASHINGTON — Americans’ household wealth rebounded last quarter to a record high as the stock market quickly recovered from a pandemic-induced plunge in March. Yet the gains flowed mainly to the most affluent households even as tens of millions of people endured job losses and shrunken incomes.

The Federal Reserve said Monday that American households’ net worth jumped nearly 7% in the April-June quarter to $119 trillion. That figure had sunk to $111.3 trillion in the first quarter, when the coronavirus battered the economy and sent stock prices tumbling.

Since then, the S&P 500 stock index has regained its record high before losing some ground this month. It was up 2.8% for this year as of Friday. The tech-heavy Nasdaq has soared more than 20% this year.

The full recovery of wealth even while the economy has recovered only about half the jobs lost to the pandemic recession underscores what many economists see as America’s widening economic inequality. Data compiled by Opportunity Insights, a research group, show that the highest-paying one-third of jobs have almost fully recovered from the recession, while the lowest-paying one-third of jobs remain 16% below pre-pandemic levels.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Trending