Check out this pop-up art exhibition in Metro Vancouver in January - Vancouver Is Awesome - Canada News Media
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Check out this pop-up art exhibition in Metro Vancouver in January – Vancouver Is Awesome

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Art lovers, be sure to keep this one on your radar for January.

Deer Lake Gallery is currently closed for the holiday season (Dec. 20 to Jan. 7), but it’s kicking off the new year with a pop-up exhibition called Something for Everyone.

The exhibition of work by Gary Liemen runs from Saturday, Jan. 18 to Saturday, Jan. 25 at the Burnaby Arts Council’s gallery at 6584 Deer Lake Ave.

“Art is for everyone, anywhere at any time,” says a write-up about the exhibition. “We may not fully understand why a banana duct-taped to a wall is art, and that’s OK. Art is meant to be enjoyed, whether it’s the joy that’s brought out from the aesthetics, or the intrigue upon closer inspection of the details.”

An opening reception for the show is set for Saturday, Jan. 18 from noon to 4 p.m.

For more about the gallery, see www.burnabyartscouncil.org or call 604-298-7322.

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Penticton Art Gallery's latest three exhibits open to the public – Keremeos Review

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Some of the art by the En’owkin Centre’s National Aboriginal Professional Artist Training program student artists is on display at the Penticton Art Gallery. (Brennan Phillips – Western News)
Author Catherine Jameson gave a reading and talk about her book Zoe and the Fawn on Jan. 24. The pages and art from the book are on display at the Penticton Art Gallery. (Brennan Phillips – Western News)
The pigments and the sources used by local artist Autumn Kruger to make the paintings displayed at the Penticton Art Gallery. (Brennan Phillips – Western News)
Autumn Kruger’s paintings, made with traditional paints, at the Penticton Art Gallery. (Brennan Phillips – Western News)
Some of the art by the En’owkin Centre’s National Aboriginal Professional Artist Training program student artists is on display at the Penticton Art Gallery. (Brennan Phillips – Western News)
Art by the En’owkin Centre’s NAPAT teachers is also on display at the Penticton Art Gallery. (Brennan Phillips – Western News)
Phyllis Isaac, a student at the En’owkin Centre, made all of the clothes, the moccasins, and the necklace on her piece “The Dancer”, as well as the woven mat it stands upon at the Penticton Art Gallery. (Brennan Phillips – Western News)
‘Forgotten Warriors’, by En’owkin student Shianna Allison greets visitors as they enter the exhibit at the Penticton Art Gallery. (Brennan Phillips – Western News)
Featured artist Scott Price has several sculptures on display at the Penticton Art Gallery. (Brennan Phillips – Western News)
One of feature artist Corinne Theissen’s paintings, currently on display at the Penticton Art Gallery. (Brennan Phillips – Western News)
One of Scott Price’s sculptures, with the art of Corinne Theissen in the background at the Penticton Art Gallery. (Brennan Phillips – Western News)
Corinne Theissen’s art is currently on display at the Penticton Art Gallery until March 15. (Brennan Phillips – Western News)

The Penticton Art Gallery opened its latest exhibits on Friday, Jan. 24. The three different exhibitions will be open to the public until March 15.

In the main gallery, the artists of the Penticton Indian Band’s En’owkin Centre had the centre stage with their Messages from the tmxʷulaʔxʷ and the sqəlxʷɬcawt Renewed.

The art on display is a mix of students and their teachers from the En’owkin Centre’s National Aboriginal Professional Artist Training program. This year’s exhibition features eight first-year students and nine second-year students, alongside some selected pieces from their teachers, alumni and one invited artist, many of who are having the first public showing of their works.

“For a lot of our students it’s the first time it is the first experience they have in being able to showcase their work in a contemporary art gallery that is a public art gallery with more well-known national shows,” said Michelle Jack, one of the professors at the En’owkin Centre.

“It’s a huge opportunity to them, that opens their eyes to what is available in the greater contemporary art world, and how it works to showcase those things and what goes into the curatorial process.”

READ MORE: Soup Bowls Project raises over $20,000 for Penticton Art Gallery

The students at the En’owkin Centre come not only from the Penticton Indian Band and the other bands in the Okanagan, but from other bands far and wide.

“We have a lot of people from across Canada who come to the En’owkin Centre to study and do the NAPAT. ” said Jack.

“There used to be a lot more aboriginal centres like ours, but due to funding stipulations and all of that. We’re not federally funded, we have to do grants and all of those things to make our programs run. Because of that a lot of secondary institutions like En’owkin in other parts of the country have had to close their doors.”

The artists at the En’owkin Centre have a wide variety of styles and mediums, from painting using traditional pigments to sculpture and more modern forms of art such as photography.

“Last year we had a piece and everyone was saying, ‘Oh, that’s a really traditional pattern,’ and [Joe Feddersen] was, that’s ‘Parking Lot A,’” said Jack.

“It was the parking lot pattern painting, how they paint the spaces, and he made a pattern of that for his basket. So he’s thinking of modern ways and what we see as would be patterns and petroglyphs, and that’s just one example of the mesh of the traditional and contemporary.”

Walking through the front door of the gallery, the first thing that will first catch your eye will most likely be the small prints lining the main hall. These pieces are the pages from local publish Theytus Books’ printing of Zoe and the Fawn, a children’s book written by local Indigenous author Catherine Jameson, and illustrated by Julie Flett.

READ MORE:Celebrate summer exhibition closings at the Penticton Art Gallery

Jameson is herself an alum of the En’owkin Centre, with her book being the product of her time there.

“One of our projects was to interview a six-year-old, and my niece at the time, Zoe, was six. This story was the one she told me, with some creative changes,” said Jameson at the talk on Saturday.

The story in Zoe and the Fawn follows young Zoe and her father, as they go outside to take care of a newborn fowl, and see a lonely fawn outside. As they look for the fawn’s mother, they find many other animals along the way.

The words in the Sy’ilx language are emphasized with the colour of Zoe’s boots, along with the English translation to help readers learn as they read along.

Copies of the book are also available at the gallery’s shop.

The third exhibition currently on display in the Project Room gallery features the works of two very different artists, with Scott Price’s found material sculptures of rusted metal, stone and wood a sharp contrast to Corrinne Thiessen’s at-times grotesque paintings of once-human figures.

Price does not approach his work with an eye for a single meaning, but rather lets the pieces speak for themselves.

“I don’t know what I’m looking for,” said Price during the artists’ talks on Jan. 25. “If the ball in [the Project Room] talks to you of big or small, of the microscopic or the cosmic. If by having the void in it, that talks to you of breaking down or building him. All those things speak to me. Whether I’m looking for those fascinating things in nature and including them in my art, I can’t answer that question.”

Thiessen and Price were selected as part of the Penticton Art Gallery’s 13th year of collaboration with Island Mountain Arts and the Toni Onley Artist Project to highlight a Canadian artist. This year, the decision was so close between the two, that they were both selected to showcase their works.

The three exhibits at the Penticton Art Gallery are on display until March 15. The Gallery will also be hosting the third annual Loving Mugs chili-cook off fundraiser on Feb. 20.

To report a typo, email: editor@pentictonwesternnews.com.


@PentictonNews
newstips@pentictonwesternnews.com

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The art of buildings – BBC News

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After thousands of public votes, the winners of the Art of Building Photographer of the Year 2019 have been announced.

The competition, run by the Chartered Institute of Building (CIOB), celebrates the creativity of the construction industry and the built world around us.

The Public Choice Award went to Alexandr Bormotin for his striking image of a metro station in Moscow.

The Judges’ Prize went to Pedro Luis Ajuriaguerra Saiz for this photo of the City of Arts and Sciences in Valencia, Spain.

Here are the other shortlisted entries voted for by the public.

All pictures courtesy of the Chartered Institute of Building.

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Penticton Art Gallery's latest three exhibits open to the public – Pentiction Western News

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Some of the art by the En’owkin Centre’s National Aboriginal Professional Artist Training program student artists is on display at the Penticton Art Gallery. (Brennan Phillips – Western News)
Author Catherine Jameson gave a reading and talk about her book Zoe and the Fawn on Jan. 24. The pages and art from the book are on display at the Penticton Art Gallery. (Brennan Phillips – Western News)
The pigments and the sources used by local artist Autumn Kruger to make the paintings displayed at the Penticton Art Gallery. (Brennan Phillips – Western News)
Autumn Kruger’s paintings, made with traditional paints, at the Penticton Art Gallery. (Brennan Phillips – Western News)
Some of the art by the En’owkin Centre’s National Aboriginal Professional Artist Training program student artists is on display at the Penticton Art Gallery. (Brennan Phillips – Western News)
Art by the En’owkin Centre’s NAPAT teachers is also on display at the Penticton Art Gallery. (Brennan Phillips – Western News)
Phyllis Isaac, a student at the En’owkin Centre, made all of the clothes, the moccasins, and the necklace on her piece “The Dancer”, as well as the woven mat it stands upon at the Penticton Art Gallery. (Brennan Phillips – Western News)
‘Forgotten Warriors’, by En’owkin student Shianna Allison greets visitors as they enter the exhibit at the Penticton Art Gallery. (Brennan Phillips – Western News)
Featured artist Scott Price has several sculptures on display at the Penticton Art Gallery. (Brennan Phillips – Western News)
One of feature artist Corinne Theissen’s paintings, currently on display at the Penticton Art Gallery. (Brennan Phillips – Western News)
One of Scott Price’s sculptures, with the art of Corinne Theissen in the background at the Penticton Art Gallery. (Brennan Phillips – Western News)
Corinne Theissen’s art is currently on display at the Penticton Art Gallery until March 15. (Brennan Phillips – Western News)

The Penticton Art Gallery opened its latest exhibits on Friday, Jan. 24. The three different exhibitions will be open to the public until March 15.

In the main gallery, the artists of the Penticton Indian Band’s En’owkin Centre had the centre stage with their Messages from the tmxʷulaʔxʷ and the sqəlxʷɬcawt Renewed.

The art on display is a mix of students and their teachers from the En’owkin Centre’s National Aboriginal Professional Artist Training program. This year’s exhibition features eight first-year students and nine second-year students, alongside some selected pieces from their teachers, alumni and one invited artist, many of who are having the first public showing of their works.

“For a lot of our students it’s the first time it is the first experience they have in being able to showcase their work in a contemporary art gallery that is a public art gallery with more well-known national shows,” said Michelle Jack, one of the professors at the En’owkin Centre.

“It’s a huge opportunity to them, that opens their eyes to what is available in the greater contemporary art world, and how it works to showcase those things and what goes into the curatorial process.”

READ MORE: Soup Bowls Project raises over $20,000 for Penticton Art Gallery

The students at the En’owkin Centre come not only from the Penticton Indian Band and the other bands in the Okanagan, but from other bands far and wide.

“We have a lot of people from across Canada who come to the En’owkin Centre to study and do the NAPAT. ” said Jack.

“There used to be a lot more aboriginal centres like ours, but due to funding stipulations and all of that. We’re not federally funded, we have to do grants and all of those things to make our programs run. Because of that a lot of secondary institutions like En’owkin in other parts of the country have had to close their doors.”

The artists at the En’owkin Centre have a wide variety of styles and mediums, from painting using traditional pigments to sculpture and more modern forms of art such as photography.

“Last year we had a piece and everyone was saying, ‘Oh, that’s a really traditional pattern,’ and [Joe Feddersen] was, that’s ‘Parking Lot A,’” said Jack.

“It was the parking lot pattern painting, how they paint the spaces, and he made a pattern of that for his basket. So he’s thinking of modern ways and what we see as would be patterns and petroglyphs, and that’s just one example of the mesh of the traditional and contemporary.”

Walking through the front door of the gallery, the first thing that will first catch your eye will most likely be the small prints lining the main hall. These pieces are the pages from local publish Theytus Books’ printing of Zoe and the Fawn, a children’s book written by local Indigenous author Catherine Jameson, and illustrated by Julie Flett.

READ MORE:Celebrate summer exhibition closings at the Penticton Art Gallery

Jameson is herself an alum of the En’owkin Centre, with her book being the product of her time there.

“One of our projects was to interview a six-year-old, and my niece at the time, Zoe, was six. This story was the one she told me, with some creative changes,” said Jameson at the talk on Saturday.

The story in Zoe and the Fawn follows young Zoe and her father, as they go outside to take care of a newborn fowl, and see a lonely fawn outside. As they look for the fawn’s mother, they find many other animals along the way.

The words in the Sy’ilx language are emphasized with the colour of Zoe’s boots, along with the English translation to help readers learn as they read along.

Copies of the book are also available at the gallery’s shop.

The third exhibition currently on display in the Project Room gallery features the works of two very different artists, with Scott Price’s found material sculptures of rusted metal, stone and wood a sharp contrast to Corrinne Thiessen’s at-times grotesque paintings of once-human figures.

Price does not approach his work with an eye for a single meaning, but rather lets the pieces speak for themselves.

“I don’t know what I’m looking for,” said Price during the artists’ talks on Jan. 25. “If the ball in [the Project Room] talks to you of big or small, of the microscopic or the cosmic. If by having the void in it, that talks to you of breaking down or building him. All those things speak to me. Whether I’m looking for those fascinating things in nature and including them in my art, I can’t answer that question.”

Thiessen and Price were selected as part of the Penticton Art Gallery’s 13th year of collaboration with Island Mountain Arts and the Toni Onley Artist Project to highlight a Canadian artist. This year, the decision was so close between the two, that they were both selected to showcase their works.

The three exhibits at the Penticton Art Gallery are on display until March 15. The Gallery will also be hosting the third annual Loving Mugs chili-cook off fundraiser on Feb. 20.

To report a typo, email: editor@pentictonwesternnews.com.


@PentictonNews
newstips@pentictonwesternnews.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Get local stories you won’t find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here


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