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China retaliates against news media in latest feud with US – The Battlefords News-Optimist

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BEIJING — China has ordered six U.S.-based news media to file detailed information about their operations in China the latest volley in a monthslong battle with the Trump administration.

A foreign ministry statement issued late Monday demanded that the bureaus of ABC, The Los Angeles Times, Minnesota Public Radio, the Bureau of National Affairs, Newsweek and Feature Story News declare information about their staff, finances, operations and real estate in China within seven days.

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The announcement came five days after U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said six Chinese media would have to register as foreign missions, which requires them to file similar information with the U.S. government.

The six were the third group of Chinese media required to do so this year. Each time, China has responded by forcing a similar number of U.S. media to file about their operations.

The ministry statement said China was compelled to take the step “in response to the unreasonable oppression the Chinese media organizations experience in the United States.”

Pompeo, in making his announcement, said the targeted Chinese media are state-owned or controlled, and that the U.S. wants to ensure that “consumers of information can differentiate between news written by a free press and propaganda distributed by the Chinese Communist Party.”

The media is one of several areas of growing tension between the two countries as the Trump administration ramps up pressure on China over trade, technology, defence and human rights.

The U.S. ordered the closing of the Chinese consulate in Houston earlier this year, and China responded by shuttering the U.S. consulate in the southwestern city of Chengdu.

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Boeing 737 MAX returns to skies with media on board – CTV News

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DALLAS, TEXAS —
Boeing Co’s 737 MAX took off on Wednesday on its first public appearance with media onboard since being grounded over fatal crashes, as one of its biggest customers, American Airlines, seeks to prove it is safe for passengers.

Wednesday’s flight from Dallas, Texas, to Tulsa, Oklahoma, comes weeks before the first commercial passenger flight on Dec. 29, and is part of a concerted PR effort to restore the jet’s image following a 20-month ban.

American Airlines Chief Executive Doug Parker said on Instagram he had flown on the MAX with his wife and airline colleagues on Tuesday “with the utmost peace of mind.”

Boeing’s best-selling jet was grounded in March 2019 after two crashes in five months killed a combined 346 people, marking the industry’s worst safety crisis in decades and undermining U.S. aviation regulatory leadership.

Wednesday’s flight marks the first time anyone besides regulators and industry personnel have flown on the MAX since the grounding, which rocked the aviation industry and ignited investigations focusing on software that overwhelmed pilots.

In a display of the turbulence caused by the COVID-19 pandemic to aviation just as the MAX starts its comeback, each of the roughly 90 journalists, flight attendants and other American Airlines employees on Wednesday’s flight wore face masks.

“The history of aviation is built around a chain of safety,” Captain Pete Gamble told passengers just before takeoff. “When the chain of safety breaks it’s up to those of us in the industry to mend it and bring it back.”

Last month, the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration cleared the jet following design changes and new training.

A smooth return to service for the MAX is seen as critical for Boeing’s reputation and finances, which have been hit hard by a freeze on MAX deliveries as well as the coronavirus crisis.

It is bracing for intense publicity from even routine glitches by manning a 24-hour “situation room” to monitor every MAX flight globally, and has briefed some industry commentators on details on the return to service, industry sources said.

Boeing has said that airlines will take a direct role in demonstrating to passengers that the 737 MAX is safe.

“We are continuing to work closely with global regulators and our customers to safely return the fleet to commercial service,” a spokesman said.

Brazil’s Gol Linhas Aereas Inteligentes is planning a similar media event this month, with cautious hopes to fly its first commercial flights as soon as next week.

CEREMONY SCRAPPED

The PR efforts are designed to highlight software and training upgrades which the FAA has said remove any doubt about the plane’s safety.

But families of some victims of the crashes in Indonesia and Ethiopia have protested the return to service, saying it is premature before a final investigative report on the second crash has been released.

Boeing toned down its original plans for the plane’s return as the crisis dragged on longer than it expected – scrapping a high-profile publicity campaign, a ceremony in the Seattle area and a tour using an Oman Air 737 MAX, industry sources said.

Airlines and leasing companies have spent hundreds of billions of dollars buying the latest upgrade of the 737, the world’s most-sold passenger aircraft.

Lured by sharp discounts and anxious to help repair the MAX’s reputation around which they have built their fleet plans, some airlines are now stepping in to show commercial support.

Alaska Airlines agreed to lease 13 Boeing 737 MAX last week and Ireland’s Ryanair is expected to place a large order for the jets as soon as this week.

Reporting by Tracy Rucinski in Dallas, Texas Additional reporting by Marcelo Rochabrun in Sao Paulo, Tim Hepher in Paris Writing by Eric M. Johnson in Seattle Editing by David Evans and Matthew Lewis.

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New report on Quebec's written media pushes the provincial government to invest in the future – CTV News Montreal

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MONTREAL —
The Quebec government welcomed the results of a new commission on the future of news media in the province on Tuesday. 

In its report, the commission points out the steep decline in advertising revenue for daily and community newspapers, and suggests spearing two problems with a single thrust by encouraging the government to invest in COVID-centric advertising in the smaller Quebec papers.

This is not a new issue. In the last decade, written media in Canada has had a hard time making ends meet. Since 2010, the take in net advertising for daily newspapers fell by almost 66.5 per cent, plummeting from more than $2 billion to just $777 million, according to News Media Canada (NMC). 

Community papers were less hard hit by the loss, but still saw their ad revenue diminish by more than 45 per cent in that same time.

While daily and community news have been struggling, however, they continue to play an important role in the media lives of Quebecers. Indeed, while Internet news has become very prominent in advertising, not everyone has access to online media. 

“In many parts of Canada and in Quebec, broadband access is limited,” said Kelly Levson, the director of marketing and research for NMC. “Many sectors of the population, some of which are most relevant to the government’s communications efforts, are not online.”

The commission highlights this as well, warning that the decline of written media could create “media deserts” in more remote areas, and this possibility is closer than you might imagine. 

According to the commission’s report, the number of weekly or bi-weekly newspapers in Quebec was almost cut in half between 2011 and 2018, falling from 200 to 132 publications. This hasn’t been a complete death knell to the written news industry, however. 

“I think that there’s a big fallacy out there that the print newspapers are having some challenges,” Levson said, “but the challenge is not that people don’t read them. Nine out of 10 Canadians and Quebecers read newspapers. They’re interested in the content and we have the same reach as the digital diet from the United States.”

The issue, Levson says, is more one of convenience. Online advertising is quick, easy to do, and requires little commitment. By comparison, arranging for an ad to be printed in newspapers across the province is more difficult and time-consuming, although it also benefits the domestic industry more strongly.

“Why would you be spending money in California when you could be spending that money in the local communities,” he argued, “and strengthening those local communities at the same time as getting your information out?”

The commission seemed to agree in its report, pointing out that declining newspapers could also have knock-on effects on other parts of the industry. If most of these papers disappear, for instance, it could mean a significant loss of income for the Canadian Press who sells wires on Canadian news to smaller outlets that cannot cover these events. On top of that, losing outlets also means losing media diversity in the province as a whole.

“In Quebec, we have a very diverse press,” said Michaël Nguyen, the president of the Fédération Professionelle des Journalistes du Québec (FPJQ). “There’s something for everyone, for every point of view.”

“We’re quite well-serviced in terms on information in Quebec,” he added. “We have to maintain this (…). It’s a whole ecosystem and all of its parts are linked together.” 

The commission did not make specific budget recommendations in its report, although last year the provincial government had floated the idea of investing $250 million over five years into the industry. This year, government money is used to buys ads that inform Quebecers about COVID-19.

While this kind of investment is a good first step, however, Nguyen says it must be a sustained effort if newspapers in Quebec are to thrive again. 

“This year is quite exceptional,” Nguyen pointed out. “And we can’t expect investment to always be this positive.” 

And continued investment is certainly one of the most needed steps beyond this year. 

“We have to maintain the quality of information we have in Quebec, which is our pride” Nguyen added, “Whether in francophone or anglophone media, we have to carry on. The report already says that the government maintains and improves advertising subsidies, and that it’ll take more than that.” 

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Boeing 737 MAX returns to skies with media onboard – National Post

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Article content continued

A smooth return to service for the MAX is seen as critical for Boeing’s reputation and finances, which have been hit hard by a freeze on MAX deliveries as well as the coronavirus crisis.

It is bracing for intense publicity from even routine glitches by manning a 24-hour “situation room” to monitor every MAX flight globally, and has briefed some industry commentators on details on the return to service, industry sources said.

Boeing has said that airlines will take a direct role in demonstrating to passengers that the 737 MAX is safe.

“We are continuing to work closely with global regulators and our customers to safely return the fleet to commercial service,” a spokesman said.

Brazil’s Gol Linhas Aereas Inteligentes is planning a similar media event this month, with cautious hopes to fly its first commercial flights as soon as next week.

CEREMONY SCRAPPED

The PR efforts are designed to highlight software and training upgrades which the FAA has said remove any doubt about the plane’s safety.

But families of some victims of the crashes in Indonesia and Ethiopia have protested the return to service, saying it is premature before a final investigative report on the second crash has been released.

Boeing toned down its original plans for the plane’s return as the crisis dragged on longer than it expected – scrapping a high-profile publicity campaign, a ceremony in the Seattle area and a tour using an Oman Air 737 MAX, industry sources said.

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