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CIBC allots $450-million for U.S. venture capital investment – The Globe and Mail

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CIBC’s new envelope of capital is targeted mostly at funds in the United States.

CHRIS HELGREN/Reuters

With competition for venture capital funding heating up across the country, Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce is aiming to expand its business in the United States, earmarking $300-million to invest mostly in U.S.-based venture capital and growth equity funds.

The bank announced a total capital commitment of $450-million on Wednesday, extending a strategy that has already seen CIBC Innovation Banking – the unit catering to tech and life-sciences companies, including startups – invest about $150-million as a limited partner in a dozen Canadian funds over the past few years.

The Toronto-based bank started making similar investments in U.S. venture capital funds this summer. And as Canada gets more crowded, CIBC Innovation Banking president and executive managing director Mark McQueen said he believes his unit has the potential to break into the top five U.S. financiers of tech and life-sciences companies.

“Dominating in Canada is impossible with, obviously, so many banks sharing a desire to focus on the early-stage economy,” he said in an interview. “But the U.S. is a much more mature and larger market, and a much bigger pie.”

Domestic competition has increased in technology banking since CIBC’s 2018 acquisition of Wellington Financial, which was led by Mr. McQueen. Rival banks have responded as demand for equity financing and venture debt from the burgeoning tech sector has exploded, fuelled by low interest rates and surging use of e-commerce, software services and health care technologies during the COVID-19 pandemic.

CIBC’s new envelope of capital is targeted mostly at funds in the United States that provide later-stage growth equity funding and participate in Series C funding rounds raised by maturing companies. As CIBC makes a broader push into the U.S. market through its CIBC Bank USA arm, after its 2017 acquisition of Chicago-based PrivateBancorp, its innovation banking unit sees a chance to grab a larger share of the highly competitive U.S. market.

“This next envelope will largely go to our best U.S. venture capital relationships,” Mr. McQueen said. “The last 24 months, we’ve certainly made lots of inroads in Canada … but our next push is to deepen the U.S. relationships.”

The bank’s strategy to invest in venture capital funds is one way CIBC aims to strengthen its ties to venture capital firms that can refer companies in need of growth capital to the bank. CIBC intends to make further investments in Canadian-led funds, but by doubling its capital commitment to venture fund investing it is aiming squarely at the U.S. market.

“Investing in the funds themselves, which is a five- or 10-year commitment, is a great way to tighten that relationship over a generation,” he said. “It’s a different way of embracing the ecosystem.”

In the past two years, CIBC Innovation Banking has invested twice in Toronto-based venture capital firm StandUp Ventures, which focuses on backing startups run by women and is led by Michelle McBane. The bank has also put money into Maverix Private Equity, which was launched by Bay Street financier John Ruffolo months after he was nearly killed in a traffic accident.

The unit has been expanding rapidly, increasing its roster of clients to 275 from 85 in 2019. It has added offices in cities such as Boston, Chicago, Atlanta and Austin, Tex., for a total of 11 outposts in North America. Most recently, the unit hired a managing director in London to serve clients abroad, bringing its employees to 52, with six more joining this month and plans to nearly double its staffing levels to 95 over the next year.

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Bitcoin hovers near 6-month high on ETF hopes, inflation worries

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Bitcoin hovered near a six-month high early on Monday on hopes that U.S. regulators would soon allow cryptocurrency exchange-traded funds (ETF) to trade, while global inflation worries also provided some support.

Bitcoin last stood at $62,359, near Friday’s six-month high of $62,944 and not far from its all-time high of $64,895 hit in April.

The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) is set to allow the first American bitcoin futures ETF to begin trading this week, Bloomberg News reported on Thursday, a move likely to lead to wider investment in digital assets.

Cryptocurrency players expect the approval of the first U.S. bitcoin ETF to trigger an influx of money from institutional players who cannot invest in digital coins at the moment.

Rising inflation worries also increased appetite for bitcoin, which is in limited supply, in contrast to the ample amount of currencies issued by central banks in recent years as monetary authorities printed money to stimulate their economies.

But some analysts noted that, after the recent rally, investors may sell bitcoin on the ETF news.

“The news of a suite of futures-tracking ETFs is not new to those following the space closely, and to many this is a step forward but not the game-changer that some are sensing,” said Chris Weston, head of research at Pepperstone in Melbourne, Australia.

“We’ve been excited by a spot ETF before, and this may need more work on the regulation front.”

 

(Reporting by Hideyuki Sano in Tokyo and Tom Westbrook in Singapore; Editing by Ana Nicolaci da Costa)

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These are the only times it's smart to make changes to your investment portfolio – CNBC

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Select’s editorial team works independently to review financial products and write articles we think our readers will find useful. We may receive a commission when you click on links for products from our affiliate partners.

Recent market volatility has many investors wondering if now is a good time to alter their investments.

The short answer experts generally advise? It’s rarely actually a good time to make changes to your investment portfolio.

“Most investors who jump in and tweak their portfolios typically do it in response to market conditions and history has shown us this just doesn’t work out in their favor,” says Tony Molina, a CPA and senior product specialist at Wealthfront. “What often feels right when it comes to investing, is usually wrong.”

Though you may feel tempted to modify your investments when the market dips, you’re often better off leaving them alone for the long haul. The reality is, downturns happen but your money is safer if you ride out the storm. Just as quickly as the market can go down, it can also go up — and keeping your cash invested throughout these fluctuations is what helps your money grow over time. This is especially true when investing in index funds and ETFs.

But, we wondered, is there ever a good time to adjust your investments? Turns out, there are a couple conditions when it’s OK.

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When it’s a good time to make changes to your investment portfolio

While it’s typically best to leave your investments alone, you may want to change course if there has been a change in your investing goals’ time horizons, and consequently, your risk tolerance, advises Ivory Johnson, a CFP and founder of Delancey Wealth Management.

On one hand, you may find that you have extended the number of years until retirement and can take on more risk. Or, on the other hand, perhaps you’re retiring sooner than you thought and shortening that timeframe means that you need to put your money in lower-risk investments.

Using a robo-advisor is an effective workaround to avoid having to worry whether your investments match your risk tolerance. Robo-advisors have users fill out a brief questionnaire that helps them know how to best allocate your cash depending on your investment goals and the top robo-advisors will regularly rebalance your portfolio for you as needed.

Betterment, for example, will recommend a stock-and-bond allocation based on your goals and adjust automatically whenever you make a deposit, withdraw funds or change your target allocation. Betterment’s algorithms will also check your portfolio drift (how far you are from your target allocation) once per day and rebalance if necessary.

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The automated investing platform through SoFi Invest® automatically rebalances investors’ portfolios as well, but on a quarterly basis. SoFi is a good option for investors also looking for lending products as SoFi members receive a 0.125% interest rate discount on SoFi’s student loan refinancing and personal loans.

Johnson adds that he would generally change an investment allocation when a big event has taken place, such as a severe illness or a large economic windfall (like an inheritance). In both of these cases, an investor’s need for capital appreciation reduces, he says.

Molina agrees that a good time for investors to make changes to their portfolios would be in response to major life events. Specifically, he means events that put the investor in a position where they would need to access their investments in the near future (three or so years). Examples include marriage, a family emergency or as an investor nears retirement.

“This would be a good reason to reduce their investment risk or pull out their funds altogether,” Molina says.

Much of an investor’s decision to change their portfolio in this scenario depends on how soon they may need to withdraw their funds. “In general, if you need the funds within the next three years or less, you may want to consider changing your investment strategy,” Molina adds.

When it comes to investing in individual stocks, keep in mind that you should be using money that you are comfortable having tied up for at least the next five years. While individual stock investors are advised to hold for the long term (especially during times of volatility) in order to best maximize their returns, they may choose to sell a losing stock if it is more risk than they can handle and it generates significant financial loss. Investing in index funds and ETFs are an easy way to take on less risk and diversify your investments.

Bottom line

If you’re thinking of adjusting your investments, most of the time it’s probably not the best move for your long-term growth in the market.

The exceptions to this rule are if your time horizon and risk tolerance suddenly change. Another exception is if there has been a major life event where you no longer need your money to be invested, or where you could be better off financially with the cash accessible in your wallet.

Catch up on Select’s in-depth coverage of personal financetech and toolswellness and more, and follow us on FacebookInstagram and Twitter to stay up to date.

Editorial Note: Opinions, analyses, reviews or recommendations expressed in this article are those of the Select editorial staff’s alone, and have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any third party.

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Cushman Investment in WeWork Rests on Successful Stock Listing – BNN

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(Bloomberg) — Cushman & Wakefield Plc agreed to invest $150 million in WeWork Cos., contingent on the flexible work company successfully completing its forthcoming stock listing, a person familiar with the matter said. 

The investment was born of a partnership the two companies unveiled Aug. 9. They said at the time that they were discussing a potential investment but hadn’t signed a definitive agreement.

A spokesman for Cushman said the company was pleased with the progress of the WeWork partnership but declined to comment on the investment. A spokesperson for WeWork also declined to comment on the investment. WeWork is preparing to go public via a $9 billion blank-check merger in late October.

The companies cited the effects of the Covid-19 pandemic as a catalyst for their accord. For many businesses, the return to the office has been a stilted process. Widespread vaccines in the U.S. brought some workers back, but the return stalled, along with vaccination rates, and outbreaks of new variants played a role.

“The partnership we announced with Cushman & Wakefield in August is a testament to WeWork’s long-term value proposition and we remain incredibly excited about the opportunities that lie ahead as we team up with one of the leading real estate firms in the world,” WeWork said in a statement Sunday.

The deal represents a marriage of old real estate and new. Cushman & Wakefied is more than a century old and one of the largest commercial real estate services companies in the world. WeWork is barely a decade old.

©2021 Bloomberg L.P.

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