adplus-dvertising
Connect with us

Media

CineFam Launches The Women Of Colour Content Creator Database

Published

 on

CineFAM is excited to launch its new initiative, the Women of Colour (WOC) Content Creator Database this March 1, 2022, to kick off International Women’s Month.  This important database can be found on the CineFAM website.  CineFAM is a Canadian not-for-profit initiative founded by award-winning filmmaker, Academy Director Member & CaribbeanTales Media Group founder, Frances-Anne Solomon.   

 

The goal of The Content Creator Database is to enhance the visibility of Women of Colour in the film industry, directors, content creators, producers, screenplay writers, actresses, animators, motion design, etc., in hopes of widening their networks and access to larger resources.  The database will consist of an abundance of women of colour filmmakers and creators within the film industry. The WOC initiative has already added 40+ Women of Color creators to its database. Some of the extraordinary women who are a part of the database are Emmy® Award Winning TV Host/Personality Patricia Jaggernauth, Award-Winning Filmmaker & Academy Director Member Frances-Anne Solomon, award-winning writer, and producer Jennifer Holness, to name a few. The Content Creator Database is still accepting applications. If you identify as a WOC filmmaker or creator, you are encouraged to fill out the following application or if you know of someone who would benefit from this initiative, please forward them the details and application form.   

 

300x250x1

The Content Creator Database is just one of CineFAM’s initiatives that aim to build capacity and viability for women creators of color and provide multiple platforms for their work to be shown.  The WOC initiative is one more step forward in that mission and is possible through a grant from The Canada Council Of The Arts, which contributes to the vibrancy of creative and diverse arts and literary scene and supports its presence across Canada and around the world. The Council is Canada’s public arts funder, with a mandate to “foster and promote the study and enjoyment of, and the production of works in, the arts.” The Council’s grants, services, initiatives, prizes, and payments support Canadian artists, authors, and arts groups and organizations. This support allows them to pursue artistic expression, create works of art, and promote and disseminate the arts and literature. Through its arts funding, communications, research, and promotion activities, the Council fosters the ever-growing engagement of Canadians and international audiences in the arts. The Council’s Public Lending Right (PLR) program makes annual payments to creators whose works are held in Canadian public libraries. The Council’s Art Bank operates art rental programs and helps further public engagement with contemporary arts through exhibition and outreach activities. The Council is responsible for the Canadian Commission for UNESCO, which promotes the values and programs of UNESCO to contribute to a future of peace, reconciliation, equity, and sustainable development.  

 

 

“This database is a step forward for WOC filmmakers’ voices to be heard and their work to be seen.  CineFAM’s mission is to promote and broaden the visibility of women of colour in the film industry and provide paths to a larger network, we look forward to welcoming as many new filmmakers as possible.”    Frances-Anne Solomon 

 

Apply now for the “Women of Colour Content Creator Database”

https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1bJ7SXEygnoaqILHcwCzsOzwyItMnoC6V9DbhhkZnVN8/viewform?edit_requested=true

Follow CineFam:    

https://www.facebook.com/CineFAMWOC    

https://www.instagram.com/cinefam_women/    

https://twitter.com/cinefam_women    

https://cinefam.ca/    

Media Inquiries:

Sasha Stoltz Publicity & Management:

Sasha Stoltz | Sasha@sashastoltzpublicity.com | 416.579.4804

Media

The media’s road to ruin its own credibility in war on Trump – New York Post

Published

 on


[unable to retrieve full-text content]

The media’s road to ruin its own credibility in war on Trump  New York Post

728x90x4

Source link

Continue Reading

Media

I'm a parent with an active social media brand: Here's what you need to check on your child's social media right now – CNN

Published

 on


[unable to retrieve full-text content]

I’m a parent with an active social media brand: Here’s what you need to check on your child’s social media right now  CNN

728x90x4

Source link

Continue Reading

Media

Why social media makes you feel bad

Published

 on

Have you ever found yourself scrolling through social media and noticed you felt a bit down? Maybe a little envious? Why aren’t you on a yacht? Running a startup? Looking amazing 24/7?

The good news is you are not alone. Although social media has some benefits, it can also make us feel a little depressed.

Why does social media make us feel bad?

As humans we inherently compare ourselves to others to determine our self-worth. Psychologists call this social comparison theory.

We primarily make two types of comparisons: upward and downward comparisons.

300x250x1

Upward comparisons occur when we compare ourselves to someone else (in real life or on social media) and feel they are better than us (an unfavourable comparison for us) in whatever domain we are assessing (such as status, beauty, abilities, success, and so on).

For example, comparing your day at work to your friend’s post from the ski fields (we’re looking at you Dave!) is likely to be an upward comparison. Another example is making appearance comparisons which can make you feel worse about yourself or your looks .

Although upward comparison can sometimes motivate you to do better, this depends on the change being achievable and on your esteem. Research suggests upward comparisons may be particularly damaging if you have low self-esteem.

In contrast, downward comparisons occur when we view ourselves more favourably than the other person – for example, by comparing yourself to someone less fortunate. Downward comparisons make us feel better about ourselves but are rare in social media because people don’t tend to post about the mundane realities of life.

 

Comparisons in social media

Social media showcases the best of people’s lives. It presents a carefully curated version of reality and presents it as fact. Sometimes, as with influencers, this is intentional but often it is unconscious bias. We are just naturally more likely to post when we are happy, on holiday or to share successes – and even then we choose the best version to share.

When we compare ourselves to what we see on social media, we typically make upward comparisons which make us feel worse. We compare ourselves on an average day to others on their best day. In fact, it’s not even their best day. It’s often a perfectly curated, photoshopped, produced, filter-applied moment. It’s not a fair comparison.

That’s not to say social media is all bad. It can help people feel supportedconnected, and get information. So don’t throw the baby out with the bathwater. Instead, keep your social media use in check with these tips.

 

Concrete ways you can make yourself feel better about social media

Monitor your reactions. If social media is enjoyable, you may not need to change anything – but if it’s making you exhausted, depressed or anxious, or you are losing time to mindless scrolling, it’s time for change.

Avoid comparisons. Remind yourself that comparing your reality with a selected moment on social media is an unrealistic benchmark. This is especially the case with high-profile accounts who are paid to create perfect content.

Be selective. If you must compare, search for downward comparisons (with those who are worse off) or more equal comparisons to help you feel better. This might include unfollowing celebrities, focusing on real posts by friends, or using reality focused platforms like BeReal.

Redefine success. Influencers and celebrities make luxury seem like the norm. Most people don’t live in pristine homes and sip barista-made coffee in white sheets looking perfect. Consider what real success means to you and measure yourself against that instead.

Practise gratitude. Remind yourself of things that are great in your life, and celebrate your accomplishments (big and small!). Create a “happy me” folder of your favourite life moments, pics with friends, and great pictures of yourself, and look at this if you find yourself falling into the comparison trap.

Unplug. If needed, take a break, or cut down. Avoid mindless scrolling by moving tempting apps to the last page of your phone or use in-built focus features on your device. Alternatively, use an app to temporarily block yourself from social media.

Engage in real life. Sometimes social media makes people notice what is missing in their own lives, which can encourage growth. Get out with friends, start a new hobby, embrace life away from the screen.

Get amongst nature. Nature has health and mood benefits that combat screen time.

Be the change. Avoid only sharing the picture-perfect version of your life and share (in a safe setting) your real life. You’d be surprised how this will resonate with others. This will help you and them feel better.

Seek help. If you are feeling depressed or anxious over a period of time, get support. Talk to your friends, family or a GP about how you are feeling. Alternatively contact one of the support lines like LifelineKids Helpline, or 13Yarn.

728x90x4

Source link

Continue Reading

Trending