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‘Close to my Heart (Near & Dear)’ art show debuts

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Francisco Corbett is pairing up with friend and housemate Alan Harman for an art show that infuses chaotic good with irony at Hoopla Press & Gallery on Oct. 26. Their close friend Maggie Whitmore is managing curation and space layout.

Corbett’s legacy as a Kingston artist has grown immensely in the last two years. His blossoming friendship with Harman—a musician and graphic designer—has opened new avenues from him to explore paint as an artistic outlet.

Harman is relatively new to Kingston compared to his gallery partner, who has lived in the Limestone City his whole life.

Genius Dog 336 x 280 - Animated

“I had a very large life change happen where I had to move out of my hometown, so I moved [to Kingston] with 19 cents in my bank account, two and a half hours from home, and didn’t know anybody,” Harman said in an interview with The Journal. 

Harman reminisced about how easily he connected with Corbett once they met.

“I was only up here for a week when I met Francisco. A really close friend of mine had gone to ForeWorld Summer Camp last year and I was aware that he was the art guy around here.”

Corbett describes Harman’s work as ironic and silly but said it matures as you look at it and understand it beneath the surface level.

“The process of [the paintings is] what gives it its flair—the intricate design layout and colour blocking—it’s really good but I almost don’t want it to be good because it’s [for example] a green block and a Marlboro pack.”

Harman describes Corbett as a performer at heart: “watching him paint is very much like an act, it’s like ballet for someone who can’t do ballet.”

When the two artists decided to do the show, Corbett went from being stagnant in his artistic work to a nine-day period in which he created a painting every day.

“What’s important when physically doing a painting is I don’t think about how this is going to look in the show, I just do it,” he said in an interview with The Journal.

Once his paintings are created, Corbett then takes a step back to think about whether they could have a place in a show.

“That’s the case with a lot of my work because of COVID,” he explained.

“I didn’t have the chance to show any of the hundreds of paintings I have in the studio, so in this case it’s nice to choose eight or nine paintings that have been made through the joy of creation and now will be shown.”

Harman first picked up a paintbrush just two weeks prior to the interview. Though he usually expresses himself artistically through graphic design and music, Corbett says he’s a natural.

“It’s really funny because [he] talks more in depth about a painting and actual paint and technique than I ever have,” Corbett said. “It’s like [he’s] been painting forever even though [he’s] a noob.”

Harman’s process of translating his design work to canvas was both exciting and new for him—he spent time taking notes and studying before ever taking brush to blank space.

“When it comes to art, my favourite works are very contemporary and kind of goofy but at the same time there’s heart in it,” Harman said.

“I was drawing a vase every single day thinking that I was going to have these vases as a subject and then realized I’m sick and tired of drawing vases.”

Harman moved on to what he enjoys most and does best: irony.

His music often explores the seriousness of life, but he said he finds himself being able to joke and experiment when it comes to painting.

The poster for the show—bright yellow with a circus tent as the central drawing—along with the title —Close to My Heart (Near & Dear)—is meant to symbolize the natural comedic timing of life and the comedic energy of Harman’s and Corbett’s work.

Corbett is looking forward to having Maggie Whitmore do curation.

“We’re really excited to see how [Whitmore] will use the space as a positive addition to our work,” he said. “We want people focusing on the painting but also how the space was made and how that itself is also art.”

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Hands-on art installation takes shape at college campus

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Artist Jill Price is showcasing some of her new art, called UN/making the Frame, at The Campus Gallery at Georgian College in Barrie.

Visitors will find in the printed handout that they are invited to “put on a suit, smell, water, zest, taste, move, touch, and rearrange elements in the space,” which helps illustrate “everyday performances that help to visualize how still-life paintings are neither two-dimensional nor still, and that the actions of humans matter.”

Price, a past instructor in Georgian College’s fundamental art and fine art programs, is an interdisciplinary artist and the recipient of several Queen’s University awards.

Genius Dog 336 x 280 - Animated

Her artwork has been shown may times overs the years going back to 2000 — in solo shows, as well as juried, group and invitational exhibitions across Ontario.

This particular exhibit “presents multiple assemblages that point to how a plastic garbage can or a ‘mere bowl of fruit’ whether painted or in the flesh, are all part of our animate and interconnected ecologies.”

“Embracing the ready-made for its potential to delineate space as well as bring attention to the accumulation and ‘liveliness’ of everyday objects.”

The arranging, placement and use of the objects is solely up to the viewer as they walk through the gallery.

There is also a stop-motion video screen that draws the visitor in to witness Price as she plays out the process of creating the pieces and documents the time, labour and the materials that were used in the artworks.

This whimsical and hands-on experience can be viewed at The Campus Gallery until Dec. 4.

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Art

Hands-on art installation takes shape at college campus

Published

 on

Artist Jill Price is showcasing some of her new art, called UN/making the Frame, at The Campus Gallery at Georgian College in Barrie.

Visitors will find in the printed handout that they are invited to “put on a suit, smell, water, zest, taste, move, touch, and rearrange elements in the space,” which helps illustrate “everyday performances that help to visualize how still-life paintings are neither two-dimensional nor still, and that the actions of humans matter.”

Price, a past instructor in Georgian College’s fundamental art and fine art programs, is an interdisciplinary artist and the recipient of several Queen’s University awards.

Her artwork has been shown may times overs the years going back to 2000 — in solo shows, as well as juried, group and invitational exhibitions across Ontario.

Genius Dog 336 x 280 - Animated

This particular exhibit “presents multiple assemblages that point to how a plastic garbage can or a ‘mere bowl of fruit’ whether painted or in the flesh, are all part of our animate and interconnected ecologies.”

“Embracing the ready-made for its potential to delineate space as well as bring attention to the accumulation and ‘liveliness’ of everyday objects.”

The arranging, placement and use of the objects is solely up to the viewer as they walk through the gallery.

There is also a stop-motion video screen that draws the visitor in to witness Price as she plays out the process of creating the pieces and documents the time, labour and the materials that were used in the artworks.

This whimsical and hands-on experience can be viewed at The Campus Gallery until Dec. 4.

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Ukrainian avant-garde art finds refuge from war in Madrid – Reuters

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MADRID, Nov 29 (Reuters) – Ukrainian art has found a refuge in Madrid where a retrospective on the country’s avant-garde in the early 20th century is showing works little known to the general public while offering them a safe haven away from the bombs.

On Tuesday, the Spanish capital’s Thyssen-Bornemisza Museum inaugurated the exhibit “In the Eye of the Storm. Modernism in Ukraine, 1900-1930s”. It showcases a collection of about 70 artworks in various formats representing different trends, from figurative art to futurism and constructivism.

Aside from paying tribute to a little-known period in the history of Ukrainian art, the exhibition takes on particular relevance amid Russia’s ongoing invasion of the country.

“We wanted to do something in terms of showing Ukrainian art, but also taking Ukrainian art out of Ukraine and bringing it to Europe and to safety,” Katia Denysova, one of the exhibit’s three curators, told Reuters.

Denysova, who described her journey out of Ukraine as a “rollercoaster”, said that transporting the works through a country at war into the European Union ran into numerous challenges.

They included the temporary closure of borders in response to the impact of a stray missile on neighbouring Polish soil, which sparked fears of an escalation two weeks ago.

When the curators saw the works had made it to Spain safe and sound, they were “beyond delighted”, Denysova added.

She now hopes that Ukrainian avant-garde art will tell the public a story of creation and resistance.

“This is an integral part of our heritage, of our culture in Ukraine. This is what Ukrainians are fighting for right now.”

Reporting by Darío Fernández, Silvio Castellanos and Michael Gore; Editing by David Latona and Mark Heinrich

Our Standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

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