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CNET's torture test of the Motorola Razr was flawed – TechSpot

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A hot potato: Motorola is standing by the durability of its newly minted Razr foldable smartphone after a questionable torture test from CNET cast it in an unfavorable light. But was this really a fair analysis?

The publication recently strapped a retail version of the Motorola Razr to a mechanical test device called the FoldBot. This robot, borrowed from the folks at warranty service provider SquareTrade, was designed specifically to simulate the opening and closing of the hinge on the Samsung Galaxy, not the Moto Razr. CNET admitted as much in its test yet still, decided to forge ahead.

The plan was to livestream the entire testing process, all 12+ hours and 100,000 folds. Unfortunately, the Razr barely made it a quarter of the way through the torture test before the hinge mechanism failed.

But was this test really fair? Motorola doesn’t think so, and neither do I.

In a statement issued to Engadget and other publications, a Motorola spokesperson said SquareTrade’s FoldBot is simply not designed to test their device. “Therefore, any tests run utilizing this machine will put undue stress on the hinge and not allow the phone to open and close as intended, making the test inaccurate,” the spokesperson added. And they are right.

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This is just my own theory, but it seems to be backed up by Motorola’s test footage. When you open and close the company’s clamshell, it needs a tiny bit of room for the two slabs to move, similar to how the screen ever-so-slightly tucks into the chin when you close it.

It appears as though the FoldBot doesn’t permit adequate movement, instead moving the slabs along a fixed path with each open and close. This restriction could have easily contributed to why the hinge failed so quickly.

Notice in Motorola’s test footage how the robot opens and closes the lid without putting any restriction on its movement. One arm simply flips the lid open while a separate arm closes it, just as a user would. Rinse and repeat. It’s much more indicative of real-world usage.

Anyway, back to the evidence. The video you likely saw is titled, “See the moment Moto’s Razr stops after 27,000 folds” but even that is misleading as the clip starts with the phone already out of the machine and making some horrendous noises. To see the actual moment it became apparent that something was wrong, you have to watch the livestreamed video.

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At around the 3:35:11 mark, CNET’s Chris Parker gets on the mic for the four-hour check-in. At roughly 3:35:50, right before the FoldBot’s counter passes 27,200 folds, something happens and the machine stops being able to fully fold the phone. Parker recognizes this and powers down the machine at 3:35:59. He proceeds to take the Razr off the machine, folds it manually several times and even powers it on to make sure it works. It creaks a little – maybe more so than earlier on – but all seems well otherwise, so they continue on.

At 3:39:47, Parker attempts to load the phone back into the torture machine but struggles to get it aligned properly. At 3:41:34, he turns the machine back on but it is unable to cycle properly as the phone isn’t correctly aligned. The phone’s position is adjusted multiple times and the machine is even put into full speed, but alas, it can’t fold it.

Inexplicably, Parker even takes the Razr out and inserts it backwards into the FoldBot, at 3:45:40. No luck.

After more adjustments, it comes back out at 3:47:54. The FoldBot is then turned on to make sure it is working (it is) and during this time, Parker manually folds the Razr, starting at 3:48:05, several more times – seemingly without incident – before sensing that something may be wrong seconds later, at 3:48:12.

So what are the takeaways here? Well for one, CNET’s test wasn’t very professional. They used a testing robot that was designed for a different phone, albeit with modifications to accommodate the Razr. The rig is also designed in a manner that if the Razr isn’t positioned perfectly, the bot can’t complete a cycle, likely putting unjust stress on the hinge. This is evident from the very beginning, 17:37, as the phone is misaligned and has to be repositioned.

What’s more, the bot doesn’t open and close fully as it does in Motorola’s testing video. I don’t know if that is good or bad, but it is worth pointing out.

Another observation is the fact that the bot seems to be doing a much better job early on in the testing, say around the 22-minute mark. If you skip ahead to, say 30:18 in the YouTube video, it appears as if the bot isn’t folding completely on every cycle. You can try setting YouTube’s playback speed to 0.25x to see this better.

The team noticed this at around 33:30 and made some adjustments, but was the damage already done?

Despite the trial-and-error, the fold counter kept climbing. The publication acknowledged that the counter wasn’t entirely accurate, but again, it’s something worth noting for those that didn’t watch the entire four-hour video.

Another concern is that CNET took the phone off the bot – and reinserted it – multiple times during the course of testing and struggled to get it aligned properly each time. Again, this is more unjust stress on the hinge mechanism.

Yet another thing worth mentioning is the cycle speed. CNET said that at full tilt, the bot opens and closes the phone 2.5 times per second. This isn’t representative of actual use and the constant cycling could have created excess heat within the hinge that would not be experienced during normal use.

[embedded content]

CNET published a video on Saturday morning titled, “See what went wrong in our Moto Razr fold test,” but even this is edited in a way that doesn’t illustrate what truly transpired.

Parker did say, however, that, “to say this phone is broken at this point is a little bit of an overstatement but it certainly isn’t working the way it was designed to work.”

Masthead credit: Moto Razr by MonicaZ82

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iOS 16 Beta 5: Battery Percentage Now Displayed in iPhone Status Bar – MacRumors

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With the fifth beta of iOS 16, Apple has updated the battery icon on iPhones with Face ID to display the specific battery percentage rather than just a visual representation of battery level. The new battery indicator is available on iPhone 12 and iPhone 13 models, with the exception of the 5.4-inch ‌iPhone 12‌/13 mini. It is also available on the iPhone 11 Pro and Pro Max, XS and XS Max, and iPhone X.


Battery percent has not been present on iPhones that have ‌Face ID‌ because of the lack of space on either side of the notch that houses the TrueDepth camera hardware. The new design adds the specific battery level to the battery icon, providing a better idea of battery status at a glance.

In iOS 15 and earlier versions of iOS, the battery icon shows a visual of the battery level, but it does not provide a specific percent. To get that information, ‌iPhone‌ users need to swipe down into Control Center or swipe over to the Today center view to see the battery widget.

The battery icon changes colors based on the status of the battery, and the color of the ‌iPhone‌’s wallpaper. When charging, for example, the battery icon is green and shows a charging indicator.

ios 16 battery indicator 2

ios 16 battery indicator 2
Battery percentage can be toggled on and off in the Settings app in the Battery section. The battery percentage feature appears to be available on most iPhones that have a notch, but it is not an option on the iPhone 12 mini, ‌iPhone 13‌ mini, ‌iPhone 11‌, or ‌iPhone‌ XR perhaps due to space constraints and/or display quality.

battery percent ios 16

battery percent ios 16
‌iOS 16‌ beta 5 is available to developers at the current time, and Apple will be releasing a public beta in the near future.

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How to watch Samsung Galaxy Unpacked 2022 in Canada – MobileSyrup

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Samsung will hold its next Galaxy Unpacked event today, August 10th, at 6am PT/9am ET.

As usual, we don’t know exactly what will be featured there, although it’s expected that we’ll see the Galaxy Fold 4, Galaxy Flip 4, new Galaxy Watches and more.

Canadians interested in tuning in to the Unpacked 2022 livestream can do so via the Samsung NewsroomSamsung’s website or Samsung’s YouTube channel.

It’s also worth noting that to coincide with Unpacked 2022, Samsung is offering a $100 e-voucher to use towards your next purchase of any Samsung product. To claim this, you’ll need to register through this site and provide some information, including your name, phone number and current device.

What are you looking forward to seeing at Unpacked 2022? Let us know in the comments.

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WhatsApp to bring screenshot blocking to THESE types of messages – HT Tech

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WhatsApp to now bring the ability to block screenshots to View Once messages. Know when this feature is coming.

WhatsApp is constantly adding new features to enhance the texting experience and these are coming faster than we could get used to them. Lately, the developers have focused on enhancing the privacy for users with a couple of new features. The ability to leave WhatsApp groups silently has draw a lot of attention lately. One can also choose who can see your online status going forward, and who can’t. However, there is another new feature that will help those who want to share sensitive media and can’t risk someone taking a screenshot of the same.

A while ago, WhatsApp rolled out the ability to send messages that can only be viewed once. The View Once feature currently only allows the media to be shown once but someone can still take a screenshot of the media, thus denying the point of the feature. Now, WhatsApp is modifying the feature, wherein it prevents the ability to take a screenshot. The feature is under development and WhatsApp hasn’t revealed the date yet.

WhatsApp to block screenshot

“View Once is already an incredibly popular way to share photos or media that don’t need to have a permanent digital record. Now we’re enabling screenshot blocking for View Once messages for an added layer of protection. We’re testing this feature now and are excited to roll it out to users soon,” says WhatsApp in its official blog.

WhatsApp will also reveal more about this and several other features in the days to come via its own campaign. “To spread the word about these new layers of protection, we’re also kicking off a campaign to educate people about the new features and our continued commitment to protecting your private conversations on WhatsApp. We hope people enjoy getting to use these new features and benefit from several options that help you keep your messages secure. We look forward to your feedback on what to build next,” it says.

Prior to this WhatsApp, recently released the ability to transfer message backups from Android to iOS devices. The same can be done from iOS to Android as well.

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