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Combining art and science in a medical practice – Rimbey Review

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– Words by Kathy Michaels Photographs by Phil McLachlan

“My life has been simple — run fast, turn left,” Dr. Andrew Dargie said over coffee one day in late fall, offering up one last thought on his work in the Okanagan and the path he took to get here.

It was an endearing understatement from someone who is clearly more comfortable with taking on big tasks than boasting about how he completed them. As a former All-American sprinter who earned a full-ride scholarship at Stanford University, speed is certainly one of the defining points of Andrew’s life. He competed for Team Canada numerous times, turning left over and over again as he rounded a track with some of the fastest people on the planet.

Genius Dog 336 x 280 - Animated

“Simple,” however, is where the sports metaphor falls apart.

For all his athletic abilities, academics were a priority for Andrew, who, after Stanford, obtained his medical doctor designation from the University of Calgary. In a newspaper article about him from that time in his life, a third dimension of his personality became clear. He is a compassionate individual. During medical school he found time to take on a meaningful volunteer commitment with the school’s aboriginal health program. For this work he was awarded the Canadian Student Athlete Community Service Award.

His next step was entering vascular surgery residency in Manitoba.

Ultimately, he said, “I realized that I loved acute care medicine, but I didn’t love the operating room. So I transferred residency programs and obtained my CCFP designation and moved to the Okanagan.”

Since arriving, he’s worked as an emergency room physician at Penticton Regional Hospital as well as South Okanagan General Hospital. At the latter location, he is the department head of Emergency Medicine.

While in the Okanagan, Andrew took on another passion and is bringing to it the same focus and dedication he has for everything else. This passion is medical aesthetics. In addition to his ER work, he now practises advanced medical aesthetics in both Kelowna and Vernon.

“I decided I love performing procedures and found something to help balance working in emergency,” he said. “It’s personally satisfying. I’m able to offer procedures that are a blend of art and science and people are appreciative and happy.”

It’s an interesting time in a rapidly expanding industry. Not so long ago, cosmetic surgery was the clear-cut facial rejuvenation strategy.

This can be a definitive solution to reduce the signs of aging, albeit an invasive, sometimes painful experience typically reserved for the socially elite and requiring significant down time for recovery.

Now, more people are seeking anti-aging services that are less invasive, have less down time and are more affordable. Just a few facial rejuvenation techniques that Andrew offers are botox, dysport, fillers and platelet-rich plasma injections. The clinics he works at offer lasers, CoolSculpting, microdermabrasions and chemical peels, amongst numerous other procedures and skin-care treatments.

While minimally invasive rejuvenation procedures are in high demand, the relative newness of the industry has created some issues and it is not as closely regulated as it perhaps should be. This was made plain in recent months as a non-medical civilian in the Vancouver area passed herself off as a doctor and injected dermal fillers into countless unwitting clients at a spa. She used an altered photocopy of a College Certificate of Licensure to convince medical suppliers that she had a medical licence and was certified to practise in British Columbia. In any other field of medicine it would sound ludicrous, but that it happened at all lays bare the fact that checks and balances are lacking.

That’s something Andrew worries about. And this is why he founded Aesthetics Training Canada, which offers “the botox course” and “the filler course.”

“Ensuring medical professionals are properly trained is of the utmost importance. There are people injecting without any formal training in facial anatomy or rejuvenation. I said, how can I change this and provide a safe and standardized way for medical professionals to expand their scope of practice to include medical aesthetics?” That was the impetus for offering these new comprehensive courses.

There are also clear gaps in proper medical care.

“We have patients come in who have been getting procedures elsewhere for years, and when I go to take them through the consent process, they say, ‘Wait, there are risks with these procedures? I was told there were zero risks,’” Andrew said. “This shocks me. That’s not proper medicine and it really bothers me. Some people think about patients in terms of syringes or units. Or some prioritize how fast they can get a patient in and out of the door. This type of practice doesn’t warn patients that there are, in fact, risks to consider.”

To start creating the change he wants to see in the industry, each of Andrew’s treatment rooms has anatomy cards so he can take patients through what he’s doing, what the risks are and how they can be mitigated.

“There are all sorts of things we can do to optimize patient care,” he said. “If I’m in emergency, whether it’s something as simple as cutting out a mole, or something more complicated like a cardioversion, we always take people through the risks and benefits, and it should be no different in medical aesthetics. Patients must consent and they must be educated that these are not completely harmless procedures and should be performed by experienced medical professionals only.”

Adverse events can occur and these can be devastating, Andrew said. The results of shoddy, haphazardly conducted work can be disfiguring or worse — even blinding — and he wants to prevent this.

He also wants to bring back a more natural look.

“People that come to see me get full transparency, and a natural look,” he said.

The day before the interview, Andrew said he had turned away four patients who had come in seeking lip filler treatment.

He’d told them, “I think your lips are already full enough and we want you to look natural.”

“They may go down the street and get that duck lip. But our patients aren’t getting that. They’re going to get an honest and fair assessment and can expect a refreshed, natural look.”

Interestingly, the four who were turned away were receptive to feedback and appreciated hearing his honest and clear communication.

Andrew has accomplished a lot in his life and is bound to take on more. What makes him different than others, however, is that he makes things look easy. He has a light and pleasant demeanour that puts people speaking to him at ease. If you didn’t know better, it would be possible to believe that he did have a simple life, remarkable only by his ability to go fast and turn left.

More info at www.drdargie.com

Story courtesy of Boulevard Magazine, a Black Press Media publication

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Hands-on art installation takes shape at college campus

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Artist Jill Price is showcasing some of her new art, called UN/making the Frame, at The Campus Gallery at Georgian College in Barrie.

Visitors will find in the printed handout that they are invited to “put on a suit, smell, water, zest, taste, move, touch, and rearrange elements in the space,” which helps illustrate “everyday performances that help to visualize how still-life paintings are neither two-dimensional nor still, and that the actions of humans matter.”

Price, a past instructor in Georgian College’s fundamental art and fine art programs, is an interdisciplinary artist and the recipient of several Queen’s University awards.

Genius Dog 336 x 280 - Animated

Her artwork has been shown may times overs the years going back to 2000 — in solo shows, as well as juried, group and invitational exhibitions across Ontario.

This particular exhibit “presents multiple assemblages that point to how a plastic garbage can or a ‘mere bowl of fruit’ whether painted or in the flesh, are all part of our animate and interconnected ecologies.”

“Embracing the ready-made for its potential to delineate space as well as bring attention to the accumulation and ‘liveliness’ of everyday objects.”

The arranging, placement and use of the objects is solely up to the viewer as they walk through the gallery.

There is also a stop-motion video screen that draws the visitor in to witness Price as she plays out the process of creating the pieces and documents the time, labour and the materials that were used in the artworks.

This whimsical and hands-on experience can be viewed at The Campus Gallery until Dec. 4.

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Art

Hands-on art installation takes shape at college campus

Published

 on

Artist Jill Price is showcasing some of her new art, called UN/making the Frame, at The Campus Gallery at Georgian College in Barrie.

Visitors will find in the printed handout that they are invited to “put on a suit, smell, water, zest, taste, move, touch, and rearrange elements in the space,” which helps illustrate “everyday performances that help to visualize how still-life paintings are neither two-dimensional nor still, and that the actions of humans matter.”

Price, a past instructor in Georgian College’s fundamental art and fine art programs, is an interdisciplinary artist and the recipient of several Queen’s University awards.

Her artwork has been shown may times overs the years going back to 2000 — in solo shows, as well as juried, group and invitational exhibitions across Ontario.

Genius Dog 336 x 280 - Animated

This particular exhibit “presents multiple assemblages that point to how a plastic garbage can or a ‘mere bowl of fruit’ whether painted or in the flesh, are all part of our animate and interconnected ecologies.”

“Embracing the ready-made for its potential to delineate space as well as bring attention to the accumulation and ‘liveliness’ of everyday objects.”

The arranging, placement and use of the objects is solely up to the viewer as they walk through the gallery.

There is also a stop-motion video screen that draws the visitor in to witness Price as she plays out the process of creating the pieces and documents the time, labour and the materials that were used in the artworks.

This whimsical and hands-on experience can be viewed at The Campus Gallery until Dec. 4.

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Art

Ukrainian avant-garde art finds refuge from war in Madrid

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MADRID, Nov 29 (Reuters) – Ukrainian art has found a refuge in Madrid where a retrospective on the country’s avant-garde in the early 20th century is showing works little known to the general public while offering them a safe haven away from the bombs.

On Tuesday, the Spanish capital’s Thyssen-Bornemisza Museum inaugurated the exhibit “In the Eye of the Storm. Modernism in Ukraine, 1900-1930s”. It showcases a collection of about 70 artworks in various formats representing different trends, from figurative art to futurism and constructivism.

Genius Dog 336 x 280 - Animated

Aside from paying tribute to a little-known period in the history of Ukrainian art, the exhibition takes on particular relevance amid Russia’s ongoing invasion of the country.

“We wanted to do something in terms of showing Ukrainian art, but also taking Ukrainian art out of Ukraine and bringing it to Europe and to safety,” Katia Denysova, one of the exhibit’s three curators, told Reuters.

Denysova, who described her journey out of Ukraine as a “rollercoaster”, said that transporting the works through a country at war into the European Union ran into numerous challenges.

They included the temporary closure of borders in response to the impact of a stray missile on neighbouring Polish soil, which sparked fears of an escalation two weeks ago.

When the curators saw the works had made it to Spain safe and sound, they were “beyond delighted”, Denysova added.

She now hopes that Ukrainian avant-garde art will tell the public a story of creation and resistance.

“This is an integral part of our heritage, of our culture in Ukraine. This is what Ukrainians are fighting for right now.”

Reporting by Darío Fernández, Silvio Castellanos and Michael Gore; Editing by David Latona and Mark Heinrich

 

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