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Common Workplace Harassment and How to Prevent It

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Workplace harassment is one of those issues that should have been solved by now. No matter how progressive our societies get, there seems to be a steady correlation between workplaces and harassment. Today we’ll talk about some of the most common forms of harassment at work, how to address it, and most importantly – how to prevent it from happening in the first place.

Sexual Harassment

We can’t talk about workplace harassment without mentioning sexual harassment first. It’s one of the primary forms of harassment that is happening all over the country as we speak. Over time, this issue went from being taboo to becoming a trigger for serious change.

Sexual harassment comes in all shapes and forms. It’s a common misconception that only women are victims of sexual harassment at work. Men are also having to deal with this problem. That being said, this issue is a serious one. Different organizations have their own definitions of what constitutes sexual harassment, but in most cases, it’s a serious offense that often triggers a broad investigation.

This form of harassment is best dealt with head-on by opening a line of communication with the offender, as well as the HR department. Do not let sexual harassment go unanswered.

Harassment Related to Sexual Orientation

Modern workplaces and organizations are much more open to the LGBTQ community than just two decades ago. That being said, there is still a lot of discrimination happening based on one’s sexual orientation. Discrimination and harassment of this type aren’t always overt.

In fact, in a massive number of cases, it is thinly veiled as something completely benign. Or at least that’s what it comes across the first time it happens. Fortunately, this type of targeted harassment is punished harshly in just about any serious organization out there.

As far as prevention goes, there are several things employers can do. The best thing to do is to raise awareness about the LGBTQ population by mandating a training course. Although it might sound like a band-aid solution, a well-structured training course can greatly boost awareness of LGBTQ issues, thus leading to a reduction in discrimination towards this group.

Harassment Through Religious Discrimination

Religions play a major role in many peoples’ lives. That being said, religion is still one of the largest points of friction between people all around the world. Harassment based on religion can occur between individuals who practice different religions, but also between atheists and theists. Where casual conversation ends and discrimination starts is often a blurred line in this particular case.

Most religious discrimination is subtle and comes in the form of offhand comments regarding one’s religious beliefs. No matter how small or large, this type of harassment leads to a hostile environment, which can snowball into a massive issue for the organization.

One of the more effective ways of dealing with this particular type of harassment is to set hard boundaries and ensure that everyone abides by the rules. No one should feel discriminated against at their place of work for any reason, including the religion they practice.

 

Racism and Xenophobia

Racism has been an ever-present issue in all aspects of life, including work. Fighting racism is an ongoing effort that has shown progress in recent decades. Experiencing racism in a work setting may not be as common as it once was, but it is still very much an issue.

Harassment based on race can be extremely subtle. Exclusion from group activities, inappropriate comments about specific facial features, or comments regarding one’s ‘curly hair’ can all be rooted in racism.

Confronting this type of behavior is imperative. Parties responsible for harassment need to be recognized and addressed through appropriate channels. In some cases racism or xenophobia is accidental. However, that is no excuse for prolonged harassment.

Personal Harassment (Bullying)

Workplace harassment doesn’t always have to stem from racial, religious, or similar differences. There are more than enough cases of personal, targeted harassment that can only be described as bullying.

Bullying in a working environment is indicative of a much larger issue at hand. If you’re suffering personal attacks from another employee, make sure to let your superiors know right away. Any organization with even a semblance of integrity will quickly resolve this issue. If not, be prepared to escalate your efforts to a higher level of authority.

Standing up to workplace harassment and discrimination is the best way to draw attention to the issue. Most organizations will do everything they can to solve such problems, but it all starts with one person standing their ground against injustice.

 

 

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What you need to know about COVID-19 in B.C. for Jan. 22 – CBC.ca

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THE LATEST:

  • Premier John Horgan will join health officials this morning to talk about the next steps in B.C.’s COVID-19 vaccination plan.
  • As of Thursday, 104,901 doses of COVID-19 vaccine have been administered in B.C.
  • The premier has announced that B.C. will not restrict interprovincial travel at this time.
  • On Thursday, 564 new cases of COVID-19 and 15 more deaths were reported.
  • There are currently 4,450 active cases of the coronavirus in B.C.
  • 309 people are in hospital, with 68 in the ICU.

Long-awaited details on B.C.’s plan for distributing COVID-19 vaccines are expected to be released Friday morning.

Premier John Horgan, Health Minister Adrian Dix, Provincial Health Officer Dr. Bonnie Henry and Dr. Penny Ballem, executive lead of the B.C. immunization rollout, are scheduled to provide more information during a public announcement at 10:30 a.m. PT.

The province’s immunization program has been complicated by a hiccup in vaccine supply from Pfizer-BioNTech. Nearly 31,000 doses of vaccine the province expected by Jan. 29 could be curtailed because of production issues.

So far, 104,901 doses of COVID-19 vaccine have been administered in B.C., including 1,680 second doses. 

Friday’s announcement follows news that B.C. will not ban non-essential travellers from other provinces in order to halt the spread of COVID-19. 

Thursday evening, Horgan said that the government has explored its legal options and it’s not possible to restrict travel at this point, but that could change if B.C. sees an increase in transmission caused by interprovincial visitors.

On Thursday, B.C. health officials announced 564 new cases of COVID-19 and 15 more deaths.

In a written statement, Henry and Dix put the number of hospitalized patients at 309 people, 68 of whom are in intensive care. Hospitalizations are now at their lowest level since Nov. 28

A total of 1,119 people in B.C. have lost their lives to COVID-19 since the pandemic began.

Henry and Dix said a new community cluster has been detected in and around Williams Lake in the central Interior. There are no new outbreaks in the health-care system, and six outbreaks have been declared over.

READ MORE:

What’s happening elsewhere in Canada

As of 8 p.m. PT on Thursday, Canada had reported 731,450 cases of COVID-19, and 18,622 total deaths.

A total of 67,099 cases are considered active.

What are the symptoms of COVID-19?

Common symptoms include:

  • Fever.
  • Cough.
  • Tiredness.
  • Shortness of breath.
  • Loss of taste or smell.
  • Headache.

But more serious symptoms can develop, including difficulty breathing and pneumonia.

What should I do if I feel sick?

Use the B.C. Centre for Disease Control’s COVID-19 self-assessment tool. Testing is recommended for anyone with symptoms of cold or flu, even if they’re mild. People with severe difficulty breathing, severe chest pain, difficulty waking up or o​​​​​​ther extreme symptoms should call 911.

What can I do to protect myself?

  • Wash your hands frequently and thoroughly. Keep them clean.
  • Keep your distance from people who are sick.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth.
  • Wear a mask in indoor public spaces.
  • Be aware of evolving travel advisories to different regions.

More detailed information on the outbreak is available on the federal government’s website.

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B.C. slated to give more details on COVID-19 vaccine program – Toronto Star

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VICTORIA – British Columbia is updating its immunization strategy for COVID-19 today as Premier John Horgan is scheduled to be joined by health officials to lay out the latest on the government’s plan.

Nearly 31,000 doses of vaccine that the province expected to arrive by Jan. 29 could be curtailed due to production delays in the supply from Pfizer-BioNTech.

Two doses of the vaccine are needed to ensure immunity from the virus that causes COVID-19 and Health Minister Adrian Dix said earlier this week that B.C. was set to begin administering second doses.

He said the province remains committed to ensuring all those who have had the first shot get a second dose within 35 days.

On Thursday, the province said it had administered 104,901 doses of COVID-19 vaccine, of which 1,680 were second doses

Horgan is being joined in making today’s announcement by Dix, provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry and Dr. Penny Ballem, who is leading the COVID-19 immunization rollout.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Jan. 22, 2021.

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B.C. slated to give more details on COVID-19 vaccine program – WellandTribune.ca

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VICTORIA – British Columbia is updating its immunization strategy for COVID-19 today as Premier John Horgan is scheduled to be joined by health officials to lay out the latest on the government’s plan.

Nearly 31,000 doses of vaccine that the province expected to arrive by Jan. 29 could be curtailed due to production delays in the supply from Pfizer-BioNTech.

Two doses of the vaccine are needed to ensure immunity from the virus that causes COVID-19 and Health Minister Adrian Dix said earlier this week that B.C. was set to begin administering second doses.

He said the province remains committed to ensuring all those who have had the first shot get a second dose within 35 days.

On Thursday, the province said it had administered 104,901 doses of COVID-19 vaccine, of which 1,680 were second doses

Horgan is being joined in making today’s announcement by Dix, provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry and Dr. Penny Ballem, who is leading the COVID-19 immunization rollout.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Jan. 22, 2021.

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