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Company that Apple is suing releases Android for iPhone

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Corellium, a company Apple is suing for alleged intellectual-property infringements, has released a tool that helps people install Android on their Apple mobile devices.

The young US cybersecurity company has pointedly named the tool ‘Project Sandcastle’ as a riff on Apple’s use of sandboxing technologies to control what users can do on their iPhones.

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While sandboxing does serve a legitimate security function, the technology doesn’t appeal to modders who believe that if you buy a piece of hardware, you should control how it is used. And that includes the possibility of installing Google’s Android on Apple’s iPhone – much like dual-booting a Linux distribution on a Windows 10 laptop.

“The iPhone restricts users to operate inside a sandbox. But when you buy an iPhone, you own the iPhone hardware. Android for the iPhone gives you the freedom to run a different operating system on that hardware,” Corellium says on its Project Sandcastle website.

Delaware-based Corellium argues that Android for iPhone can be useful for forensics research and to help reduce e-waste, but the release is likely to be a cheeky barb directed at Apple, which is suing it over intellectual property violations for its iOS virtualization technology.

The company’s technology struck a raw nerve with Apple execs and lawyers who sued the company last August.

Corellium boasted its service was the “first and only platform to offer iOS, Android, and Linux virtualization on Arm”. Apple argues that selling a virtualized version of iOS violates its intellectual-property rights.

Corellium in October argued that it only licensed its virtualized iOS tech to “well-known and well-respected financial institutions, government agencies, and security researchers”. The virtualized version of iOS can only be used for research and development and lacks features like calling, texting, accessing iCloud, and taking pictures.

According to Corellium, Apple had invited Corellium researchers to its security bug bounty program and even attempted to acquire the company. The security startup alleges that the Cupertino company decided to sue it after failing to agree on a price.

Project Sandcastle was first reported by Forbes, which also reported that Apple had subpoenaed Spain’s Santander Bank and the intelligence contractor L3Harris Technologies – which owns Azimuth Security – for information about how they use Corellium’s iOS virtualization tech.

Azimuth Security, which was founded by Australian security expert Mark Dowd, is considered one of the best companies at finding iOS security bugs. Instead of reporting iOS bugs to Apple’s bug bounty program, the company sells them to law enforcement and intelligence agencies.

Dowd in October told Motherboard he had never reported an iOS bug he found using Corellium to Apple. The iPhone maker in December raised its top payout for security flaws to $1.5m, which is $500,000 less than one exploit broker currently offers for iOS flaws.

Apple in January expanded its lawsuit against Corellium on the basis that its tech enables jailbreaking and violates the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) ban on bypassing copyright-protection systems.

Corellium’s project is currently in beta and only supports Android for the iPhone 7 and 7+.

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MacBook Pro 13 and MacBook Air with ARM processors to enter mass production in Q4 2020; ARM-powered MacBook Pro 14 and MacBook Pro 16 joining in mid-2021 – Notebookcheck.net

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Alex Alderson, 2020-07-10 (Update: 2020-07-10)

Prior to writing and translating for Notebookcheck, I worked for various companies including Apple and Neowin. I have a BA in International History and Politics from the University of Leeds, which I have since converted to a Law Degree. Happy to chat on Twitter or Notebookchat.

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LinkedIn sued after being caught reading users’ clipboards on iOS 14 – 9to5Mac

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LinkedIn was recently caught reading users’ clipboards on iPhone and iPad thanks to the new privacy features of iOS 14, as we reported last week. Even though the company claimed it was due a software bug, there’s now an iPhone user who’s suing LinkedIn for supposedly reading sensitive content from the clipboard without permission.

According to a Yahoo! Finance report, Adam Bauer filed a lawsuit in the San Francisco federal court arguing that LinkedIn collects personal information from iPhone and iPad users via the system’s clipboard.

Bauer complains that LinkedIn may not only have access to private data from the device on which the app is installed, but also from other nearby devices such as a Mac through Apple’s Universal Clipboard feature.

The class-action lawsuit lawsuit classifies the problem as an alleged violation of the law or social norms under California laws. LinkedIn hasn’t commented on the situation yet, but the company said a few days ago that the iOS app wasn’t intentionally reading the users’ clipboard, but due to a software bug.

iOS 14 and iPadOS 14 includes a new banner alert that lets users know if an app is pasting from the clipboard, which is part of a series of new privacy features Apple is adding to its operating systems this year.

This particular clipboard feature is already exposing the behavior of some popular apps like TikTok, AccuWeather, AliExpress, and now LinkedIn. Even after several reports on the web, this is the first time a user has filed a lawsuit based on the new iOS 14 privacy feature — and the update has been available to a restricted number of users for just two weeks.

We’re yet to know if the court will accept the user’s appeal against LinkedIn.

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Apple Warns Against Closing MacBooks With a Cover Over the Camera – MacRumors

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Apple this month published a support document that warns customers against closing their Mac notebooks with a cover over the camera as it can lead to display damage.

Image via Reddit
Apple says that the clearance between the display and the keyboard is designed to very tight tolerances, which can be problematic. Covering the camera can also cause issues with automatic brightness and True Tone.

If you close your Mac notebook with a camera cover installed, you might damage your display because the clearance between the display and keyboard is designed to very tight tolerances. Covering the built-in camera might also interfere with the ambient light sensor and prevent features like automatic brightness and True Tone from working. As an alternative to a camera cover, use the camera indicator light to determine if your camera is active, and decide which apps can use your camera in System Preferences.

The warnings from Apple likely stem from complaints from MacBook Pro owners who have seen their displays crack after covering the camera, and there are multiple reports and warnings on sites that include MacRumors and Reddit. The issue appears to be especially bad with the new 16-inch ‌MacBook Pro‌ models that have thinner bezels.

Image via the MacRumors Forums
MacRumors forum member Dashwin, for example, put a webcam cover on his 16-inch ‌MacBook Pro‌ in April and the result was a crack in the display under where the camera is located.

The latest MBP 16 inch with the thin tiny bezels and display comes at a cost of breakage with the tiniest of forces with a webcam cover in place. The internal display no longer works and I’ve had to connect it to an external display. I’ve had one of the exact same webcam covers on my 2011 MBP with no issues whatsoever for many years.

Damage from applying a webcam cover to the camera is considered accidental and can be repaired under AppleCare+, but it’s quite possible it’s an issue that Apple won’t fix for customers that don’t have ‌AppleCare‌+, and it’s an expensive fix.

Apple says that customers concerned about illicit camera access should watch for the green light that comes on when the camera is activated. The camera is engineered so that it can’t be accessed without the indicator light turning on.

MacBook owners can also control which apps have access to the built-in camera as users must grant permission for camera use on any operating system after macOS Mojave. For those who do need to cover the camera, Apple recommends a camera cover that’s not thicker than the average piece of printer paper (0.1mm) and that does not leave adhesive residue.

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