Connect with us

Art

Contemporary And Antique Jewels To Sparkle At ‘TEFAF Online’ Art Fair – Forbes

Published

 on


The European Fine Art Foundation (TEFAF) will be hosting an online fair November 1 – 4 with two preview days on October 30 – 31. The virtual show takes the place of TEFAF New York Fall, which was canceled because of the global Coronavirus pandemic. More than 300 exhibitors are taking part in this event titled, “TEFAF Online,” including a number of contemporary jewelry designers and antique jewelry dealers. Some of the jewelers will be exhibiting for the first time in this prestigious setting.

Those who attend TEFAF Online will have the option of live and immediate interactions with all exhibitors, who will be available for discussion and to conduct business. To virtually attend the event, go to the signup page to pre-register. The participating jewelers are as follows:

Contemporary jewelry designers and artists

Wallace Chan

The Hong Kong-based high jewelry artist has earned high praise throughout the world for his dreamlike artistic creations and his groundbreaking techniques as a craftsman. He remains one of the few, likely the only, high jewelry artist who designs and crafts his pieces. He’s become a popular lecturer and he attracts the largest crowds at the most prestigious art fairs. His pieces have been featured in world renowned museums.

For TEFAF Online, Chan is unveiling the “In Love with Spring” butterfly brooch (top photo), which highlights both his technical genius and his gift for storytelling. Created in 2014, the jewel conveys Chan’s vision of “flying colors” with meticulous gemstone settings. The gemstones on the butterfly’s wings are angled to convey a sense of life and movement. Swirling lines and patterns come together, forming a labyrinth of colors and fantasies that resemble a butterfly’s utopia of trees and flowers. The piece features an 8.24-carat imperial topaz emerald for the butterfly’s body. The wings are made of swirling patterns of, rubies, yellow diamonds, orange sapphires, tsavorite garnets and diamonds set in titanium.

Cindy Chao The Art Jewel

The Taiwanese high jewelry artist now based in Hong Kong has earned international acclaim for her sculptural gem-encrusted creations. A few of her pieces end up at auction where they command high prices and some others are exhibited in museums.

One of the jewels she is featuring is the 2020 Black Label Masterpiece III Green Plumule Brooch. This piece features 487 fancy-cut emeralds of several shapes and sizes, totaling 172.58 carats. Seventeen of them come from Colombia, with the largest being 30.06 carats. The emeralds are set in an interlaced- and embossed-like manner to create a three-dimensional contour for the brooch that portrays an airy appearance. A total of 14 barbs, all linked to the yellow diamond-paved rachis with flexible joints provide motion. The rachis on the back of the brooch is painted with a layer of black enamel with white and yellow diamonds. All of the gems are set on lightweight and strong titanium so despite being 15 centimeters long (6 inches) and filled with gems. It weighs less than 49 grams (1.7 ounces).

Hemmerle

The Munich, Germany, based high jeweler is known for its unique, exceptionally crafted pieces that can combine anything from ancient artifacts to high-tech materials. For this virtual event, the brand has included a one-of-a-kind tassel pendant necklace. The tassel is made of small natural pearls suspended from a base of silver and white gold paved with reverse-set diamonds. The cord is made of smoky quartz beads that have been knitted into the round using a revived near-extinct Austrian technique from the early 19th century of woven, knitted, precious gem beads. Each bead is hand-hewn and carved, hand-drilled, matched for color, and carefully calibrated and graduated to achieve a silky gem-mesh knitted in the round, on hand-dyed silk thread.

Otto Jakob

The German goldsmith specializes in miniature jewels depicting lifelike flora and fauna themes, enduring geometric shapes, and realistic depictions of tools and weapons from the Renaissance and Middle Ages. Everything he does showcases artistic details and artisan techniques that combine gold with enamel and a variety of colored gemstones. His pieces for the fair include “Lale VII,” made of yellow and white gold; diamonds; and red, green and black vitreous enamel.

Gismondi 1754

It will be the first time this family owned Italian jeweler will be participating in TEFAF. For its introduction the Genoa-based company will unveil the Genesi (Genesis) Collection. The nature-influenced pieces are inspired by the helix spiral shell of the Nautilus. Massimo Gismondi, the latest family member to head the company was inspired by 500-year-old fossils of the sea creature he saw at the Natural History Museum of Genoa.

He said he saw a link among science, nature, history and mathematics. “I marveled in the perfection of its shape and its power, repeated a multitude of times in nature from galaxies to petals or seeds of the sunflowers in a range of sizes and proportions,” said Massimo, CEO and creative director.

The curvaceous 18k rose gold strands are paved with diamonds and topped with a row of white ceramic in tear-drop shapes edged in gold.

Taffin

James Taffin de Givenchy is a French native who opened the New York high jewelry house, Taffin, in 1996. Since then he had gained a growing and glowing reputation for his contemporary one-of-a-kind art creations that are unlike no other in terms of shapes, materials and color. The necklace pictured is an example of the types of jewels he creates. Here he pairs a 57.55-carat blue oval tanzanite with oval and round shaped pebbles, and sets the materials on platinum and 18k rose gold.

Vendorafa

Also is making its first appearance at TEFAF, the Valenza, Italy, jeweler specializes in gold creations that combine a number of old world goldsmith techniques with modern technological advances. The Onda ring is an example of this. The jewel combines hammering with high polish finishing techniques. The edge of the ring is lined with diamonds.

Nicholas Lieou

The Hong Kong based high jewelry designer began his career as an apprentice for the avant-garde London jeweler, Shaun Leane. He also worked for several luxury houses, including Louis Vuitton, Georg Jensen and Shanghai Tang, before being appointed director of Design for High Jewelry and Custom Design at Tiffany & Co. In 2019, he launched his eponymous brand. He most recently launched a capsule collection in partnership with Sotheby’s Diamonds, the retail boutique specializing in the statement diamonds. One of the pieces in the collection is the “Pod Ring,” in which a 4.40-carat fancy deep bluish-green cushion-cut diamond weighing glimmers from a cocoon of reverse-set pavé diamonds in platinum.

Tatiana Verstraeten

The Belgian native learned her high jewelry skills at Chanel under the tutelage of Karl Lagerfeld’s watchful eye. It’s where the longtime artist began making jewelry and it’s where she discovered the exceptional skills of French master craftsmen. Her reputation quickly grew and a year ago she opened a showroom on Place Vendôme. Recently, she donated the sale of her “Pearl Pearl Rain Fringe Earrings” to UN Women France to promote gender equality and the empowerment of women. The long elegant diamond and pearl earrings have been worn by celebrities that include Cate Blanchett and Eva Longoria.

Antique jewelry dealers

Didier Ltd

This London firm owned by Didier and Martine Haspeslagh has a unique niche among collectors and dealers of antique and vintage jewelry. It specializes in jewels created by painters, sculptors, architects and designers from the late 19th to the end of the 20th century. For this virtual fair, one of its pieces is the “Poseidon” necklace by Georges Braque. The 20th century French artist, who works in a number of media, is best known for his alliance with Fauvism and the role he played in the development of Cubism with his colleague Pablo Picasso. This ornate piece is made of 18k yellow gold and platinum set with diamonds

Marjan Sterk

The Amsterdam-based firm is one of the leading Dutch dealers in antique jewelry and silver. One of the pieces she is presenting is the “toi et moi” ring set signed and numbered by Cartier. One ring is in platinum with pavé set brilliant cut diamonds centered with a pear-shaped emerald; and the other is in 18k yellow gold spotted with emeralds and centered with a pear-shaped diamond.

Siegelson

The third-generation gem and jewelry dealer is based in New York. One of the pieces the firm is offering for the virtual show is an Art Moderne gold, platinum, and diamond necklace (Paris, circa 1940) by celebrated French jewelry artist, Suzanne Belperron. Inspired by African neck pieces, the necklace is layered with alternating strands of smooth high polished yellow gold and platinum paved with diamonds. The corners are fixed with rivets of polished yellow gold with diamond-set slices in the shape of a highlight.

Wartski

The famed London dealer is one of a select few Royal jewelers. It specializes in historic Fabergé creations and has pieces and has a detailed collection that spans from the 18th to 20 century. One piece it is highlighting at the fair is a “Medusa brooch” (Paris 1870) made of carved agate and yellow gold.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Art

Red Deer city council opts to leave public art selection to a commission – Red Deer Advocate

Published

 on


Red Deer city council quadrupled the size of municipal projects that would trigger the one-per-cent budget spending on public art — raising the threshold from $250,000 to $1 million.

But most councillors refused to takeover decision-making authority on public art installations from the public art commission.

This last suggestion was floated by Coun. Vesna Higham, who mentioned two controversial Calgary public artworks that were largely derided by taxpayers as a waste of money. One of them was a large metal hoop, costing $400,000.

Higham said she didn’t feel right allowing non-elected officials on a commission to have the authority to spend taxpayer money. People elect city council for that purpose, added Higham, who wanted an art committee to make recommendations to council, who would have final authority.

But other councillors refused to wade into the thorny area of second-guessing what a group made up of art experts, as well as general citizens, decides.

Coun. Tanya Handley said art is subjective. Contradicting a committee’s opinion would not only be awkward but would indicate little respect for the group members’ time or expertise, she added.

Three years ago, council decided to upgrade a former art committee to the present art commission specifically to give it the authority to adjudicate art without having to get council’s approval.

Two un-elected citizens are appointed to serve on the Municipal Planning Commission, entrusted with making major development decisions — so why not trust un-elected citizens with the selection of public art, a councillor noted.

Coun. Lawrence Lee said having an art selection commission has worked well, with few people taking issue with installations such as the bronze statues of young hockey players and a referee in front of Servus Arena. “We have to trust in the process.”

Coun. Dianne Wyntjes did not favour raising the threshold for when one per cent of a municipal construction project’s budget would need to be put aside for public art. It used to be when projects hit $250,000. Administration had recommended this be raised to $500,000.

But most councillors eventually voted to raise the threshold to $1 million after hearing that only once in the last decade had a project worth less than $1 million triggered a public art component.

While the regional economic slump was one rationalization given for this change, Lee also reasoned that a certain amount of money would be needed to pay the artist for a quality artwork that was substantive and meaningful.

Wyntjes believes that public art adds so much to a community’s public spaces that it’s one of the most important legacies for any city council.

red deer city

Get local stories you won’t find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Art

Ingersoll Creative Arts Centre to host annual Christmas art show – Cochrane Times

Published

 on


The Ingersoll Creative Arts Centre is encouraging people to shop local this holiday season and is hosting a craft show next month featuring local artists.

The Ingersoll Creative Arts Centre is hosting a Christmas arts sale in November, with attendance by ticketed appointment to control crowds. (Ingersoll Creative Arts Centre)

The Ingersoll Creative Arts Centre is encouraging people to shop local this holiday season so is hosting a craft show next month featuring local artists.

The Deck the Halls craft sale will feature original paintings, pottery, photography, jewelry and quilted items, and run for three days from Nov. 20 to Nov. 22.

To accommodate crowd size limits and safe social distancing, people are asked to register for a ticket and attend during a designated 45-minute time slot. Tickets are free, and masks are mandatory.

After the three-day sale, many goods will be available in the gallery during regular hours.

Find more information and tickets at creativeartscentre.com.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Art

Ingersoll Creative Arts Centre to host annual Christmas art show – Sarnia Observer

Published

 on


The Ingersoll Creative Arts Centre is encouraging people to shop local this holiday season and is hosting a craft show next month featuring local artists.

The Ingersoll Creative Arts Centre is hosting a Christmas arts sale in November, with attendance by ticketed appointment to control crowds. (Ingersoll Creative Arts Centre)

The Ingersoll Creative Arts Centre is encouraging people to shop local this holiday season so is hosting a craft show next month featuring local artists.

The Deck the Halls craft sale will feature original paintings, pottery, photography, jewelry and quilted items, and run for three days from Nov. 20 to Nov. 22.

To accommodate crowd size limits and safe social distancing, people are asked to register for a ticket and attend during a designated 45-minute time slot. Tickets are free, and masks are mandatory.

After the three-day sale, many goods will be available in the gallery during regular hours.

Find more information and tickets at creativeartscentre.com.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Trending