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Coronavirus: Travellers coming back to Canada now mandated to isolate, feds say – Global News

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Anyone returning to Canada from abroad amid the coronavirus pandemic will no longer just be asked to self-isolate upon their return — that order is now mandatory.

Health Minister Patty Hajdu said during an appearance at the Senate on Wednesday that the government is done asking those returning to Canada from other countries to respect the request to go directly home and stay there for 14 days.

READ MORE: Senate passes Trudeau’s $82B coronavirus support package

She is now invoking the Quarantine Act to force them to do so, effectively immediately.

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The move comes after repeated reports of travellers, including Canadians rushing to return as the border closed and commercial travel options disappeared, stopping to pick up groceries or do errands after they had crossed the border back into Canada.

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It also comes after Global News reported that border officials allowed a Markham woman back into the country who was so ill with the coronavirus that she died within hours of re-entry.

READ MORE: CBSA ‘looking into circumstances’ of traveller who died of COVID-19 hours after landing in Toronto

Deputy Prime Minister Chrystia Freeland said that mandatory isolation will apply to all travellers, including those from the U.S., but that it will not apply to those deemed to be doing “essential work.”

Travellers will also be barred from using public transit to get to the place where they will be isolating.

“It will, from midnight tonight, be a legal obligation of people entering Canada from outside Canada to self-isolate for 14 days,” Freeland said.

“In terms of the specific penalties and enforcement mechanisms, we will be giving you more information later today.”

She added the measures will not be retroactive for people who have already entered Canada in recent weeks, but said border officials will be taking the contact information of everyone entering the country as of midnight so that they can monitor whether they are obeying the mandatory isolation.

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Hajdu told reporters in a scrum on Wednesday that there will be “significant penalties” for those who don’t obey the new law.

“There will be follow up. There will be random screening and there will be spot screening based on particular situations.,” she said. “My officials are working with CBSA right now to ensure that people know that this will be serious and that there will be significant penalties if people violate the quarantine.”

The government has faced questions over its border screening measures for weeks, particularly with regards to whether the screening being done on the ground was effective and why measures like temperature testing were not being rolled out at re-entry points.






1:43
Kenney issues special warning to snowbirds returning from U.S. to self-isolate


Kenney issues special warning to snowbirds returning from U.S. to self-isolate

Officials have said things like taking temperatures are not effective and that the screening being done at borders includes questions about a person’s travel history and health designed to identify who needs to be directed to further resources.

Even earlier on Wednesday, Trudeau had been asked about why his government had not made isolation mandatory for travellers coming into the country.

“It is required for people to stay at home for 14 days,” he said, but was repeatedly pressed by reporters who noted that there was no legal obligation to that request.

He gave no indication that the government had, just hours earlier, invoked the Quarantine Act.

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1:54
Prime Minister Trudeau losing patience with people who don’t practice social distancing


Prime Minister Trudeau losing patience with people who don’t practice social distancing

© 2020 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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The latest news on COVID-19 developments in Canada on Nov. 23, 2020 – Kamloops This Week

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The latest news on COVID-19 developments in Canada (all times Eastern):

6:15 p.m.

article continues below

There have been 17 deaths in British Columbia over three days due to COVID-19 and provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry says most of the victims were seniors in long-term or assisted care.

There have been 1,933 new cases since Friday, with 1,304 of them diagnosed in the Fraser Health region.

There are 60 active outbreaks in health-care facilities, including 54 long-term care or assisted-living sites and six hospitals or acute-care facilities.

Henry says it’s now the most challenging time of COVID-19 and everyone is feeling the strain.

4:10 p.m.

Saskatchewan Premier Scott Moe is self-isolating due to a possible exposure to COVID-19.

A spokesman for Moe’s office says the potential exposure happened on Nov. 15 in the Prince Albert area.

Jim Billington says the premier is not experiencing symptoms but was tested today out of an abundance of caution.

He says Moe is to work remotely from his home in Shellbrook until Sunday.

The province announced 235 new cases today and four new deaths.

2:55 p.m.

Nova Scotia is reporting 11 new cases of COVID-19 today.

The province says the new cases were identified on Sunday in the Central Zone, bringing its total active case count up to 51.

Eight of the infections are connected to previously reported cases, while three are still under investigation.

Officials say the recent rise in cases has led to stricter rules for metro Halifax Regional Municipality and parts of Hants County which go into effect today.

2:10 p.m.

New Brunswick is reporting one new death and 15 new cases of COVID-19.

The new death brings the provincial fatality total to seven.

The province currently has 89 active cases of novel coronavirus and has registered 445 total cases and 349 recoveries.

Premier Blaine Higgs says there are no changes planned at this point around the Atlantic bubble despite the temporary withdrawal of Newfoundland and Labrador and Prince Edward Island.

1:40 p.m.

COVID-19 cases in Yukon have jumped to 38, 14 more infections than just a week ago.

Territorial health officer Dr. Brendan Hanley says two of the new cases involve children under nine years old and at least one of those infected is over 60.

Yukon increased restrictions last week as infection rates jumped in jurisdictions around it, requiring all but critical services workers to self-isolate for two weeks when they enter the territory.

Hanley says community transmission has not yet been ruled out in some of the latest cases.

1:40 p.m.

Manitoba health officials are reporting a record-high 543 new COVID-19 cases.

Chief public health officer Dr. Brent Roussin says there are some positive signs, however.

He says the average number of contacts per case is dropping, which could slow the spread of the novel coronavirus.

Manitoba brought in strict measures last week that limit store openings and public gatherings.

11:40 a.m.

Newfoundland and Labrador is reporting two new cases of COVID-19 and its first case confirmed in a school.

In a press conference today, officials announced one of the new cases is a student at the elementary school in Deer Lake, in western Newfoundland.

The student’s infection is connected to a cluster of cases in the area.

Officials say the other case is also in western Newfoundland, but is related to travel and is not connected to the ongoing cluster.

11:20 a.m.

Prince Edward Island Premier Dennis King has announced his province will be temporarily withdrawing from the Atlantic bubble for a two-week period starting tomorrow.

He says it’s a necessary step because of a spike in COVID-19 cases in the other three Atlantic provinces.

King says all non-essential travel to and from the Island will be suspended until December 7th, at which time the situation will be re-evaluated.

The Island reported one new case of COVID 19 today.

11:10 a.m.

Quebec is reporting 1,164 new cases of COVID-19 and 13 more deaths attributed to the novel coronavirus, including three that occurred in the past 24 hours.

Health officials say today that hospitalizations decreased by eight, to 634, and 98 patients were in intensive care, a drop of five.

The province says 1,282 more people recovered from COVID-19, for a total of 115,367 recoveries.

Quebec has reported 133,206 COVID-19 infections and 6,842 deaths linked to the virus since the start of the pandemic.

10:45 a.m.

Ontario is reporting 1,589 new cases of COVID-19 today, and 19 new deaths due to the virus.

Health Minister Christine Elliott says 535 in Peel Region, 336 cases are in Toronto, and 205 cases in York Region.

The province says it has conducted 37,471 tests since the last daily report.

In total, 507 people are hospitalized in Ontario due to COVID-19, including 156 in intensive care.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Nov. 23, 2020.

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The latest news on COVID-19 developments in Canada on Nov. 23, 2020 – Kamloops This Week

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 on


The latest news on COVID-19 developments in Canada (all times Eastern):

6:15 p.m.

article continues below

There have been 17 deaths in British Columbia over three days due to COVID-19 and provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry says most of the victims were seniors in long-term or assisted care.

There have been 1,933 new cases since Friday, with 1,304 of them diagnosed in the Fraser Health region.

There are 60 active outbreaks in health-care facilities, including 54 long-term care or assisted-living sites and six hospitals or acute-care facilities.

Henry says it’s now the most challenging time of COVID-19 and everyone is feeling the strain.

4:10 p.m.

Saskatchewan Premier Scott Moe is self-isolating due to a possible exposure to COVID-19.

A spokesman for Moe’s office says the potential exposure happened on Nov. 15 in the Prince Albert area.

Jim Billington says the premier is not experiencing symptoms but was tested today out of an abundance of caution.

He says Moe is to work remotely from his home in Shellbrook until Sunday.

The province announced 235 new cases today and four new deaths.

2:55 p.m.

Nova Scotia is reporting 11 new cases of COVID-19 today.

The province says the new cases were identified on Sunday in the Central Zone, bringing its total active case count up to 51.

Eight of the infections are connected to previously reported cases, while three are still under investigation.

Officials say the recent rise in cases has led to stricter rules for metro Halifax Regional Municipality and parts of Hants County which go into effect today.

2:10 p.m.

New Brunswick is reporting one new death and 15 new cases of COVID-19.

The new death brings the provincial fatality total to seven.

The province currently has 89 active cases of novel coronavirus and has registered 445 total cases and 349 recoveries.

Premier Blaine Higgs says there are no changes planned at this point around the Atlantic bubble despite the temporary withdrawal of Newfoundland and Labrador and Prince Edward Island.

1:40 p.m.

COVID-19 cases in Yukon have jumped to 38, 14 more infections than just a week ago.

Territorial health officer Dr. Brendan Hanley says two of the new cases involve children under nine years old and at least one of those infected is over 60.

Yukon increased restrictions last week as infection rates jumped in jurisdictions around it, requiring all but critical services workers to self-isolate for two weeks when they enter the territory.

Hanley says community transmission has not yet been ruled out in some of the latest cases.

1:40 p.m.

Manitoba health officials are reporting a record-high 543 new COVID-19 cases.

Chief public health officer Dr. Brent Roussin says there are some positive signs, however.

He says the average number of contacts per case is dropping, which could slow the spread of the novel coronavirus.

Manitoba brought in strict measures last week that limit store openings and public gatherings.

11:40 a.m.

Newfoundland and Labrador is reporting two new cases of COVID-19 and its first case confirmed in a school.

In a press conference today, officials announced one of the new cases is a student at the elementary school in Deer Lake, in western Newfoundland.

The student’s infection is connected to a cluster of cases in the area.

Officials say the other case is also in western Newfoundland, but is related to travel and is not connected to the ongoing cluster.

11:20 a.m.

Prince Edward Island Premier Dennis King has announced his province will be temporarily withdrawing from the Atlantic bubble for a two-week period starting tomorrow.

He says it’s a necessary step because of a spike in COVID-19 cases in the other three Atlantic provinces.

King says all non-essential travel to and from the Island will be suspended until December 7th, at which time the situation will be re-evaluated.

The Island reported one new case of COVID 19 today.

11:10 a.m.

Quebec is reporting 1,164 new cases of COVID-19 and 13 more deaths attributed to the novel coronavirus, including three that occurred in the past 24 hours.

Health officials say today that hospitalizations decreased by eight, to 634, and 98 patients were in intensive care, a drop of five.

The province says 1,282 more people recovered from COVID-19, for a total of 115,367 recoveries.

Quebec has reported 133,206 COVID-19 infections and 6,842 deaths linked to the virus since the start of the pandemic.

10:45 a.m.

Ontario is reporting 1,589 new cases of COVID-19 today, and 19 new deaths due to the virus.

Health Minister Christine Elliott says 535 in Peel Region, 336 cases are in Toronto, and 205 cases in York Region.

The province says it has conducted 37,471 tests since the last daily report.

In total, 507 people are hospitalized in Ontario due to COVID-19, including 156 in intensive care.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Nov. 23, 2020.

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PM touts deal for 26K doses of COVID-19 therapeutic, seeks to temper vaccine expectations – CTV News

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OTTAWA —
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has announced that the federal government has signed a deal to secure up to 26,000 doses of a COVID-19 therapeutic drug from Eli Lilly, with the option to receive thousands more.

He also sought to temper Canadians’ expectations around the timing and rollout of an eventual vaccine or vaccines to immunize against the novel coronavirus.

“To keep Canadians safe, we need access to as many potential vaccines and treatments as possible,” Trudeau said during his Rideau Cottage address on Tuesday.

Trudeau said that, while there has been promising news about some vaccine candidates that Canada will receive millions of doses of, it will still be months before vaccines are expected to arrive on Canadian soil.

The prime minister has previously said that Canada is expecting initial doses — to be distributed on a priority basis — in the early months of 2021 once granted approval by Health Canada, but several other nations are making plans to begin administering vaccines next month.

Among the promising candidates so far are Pfizer, Moderna, and AstraZeneca, all of which Canada has begun the domestic approval process for. However, Trudeau said that because it’s been years since Canada’s had domestic production capacity for vaccines, the countries where these pharmaceutical companies are based will “obviously” prioritize vaccinating their citizens before shipping doses internationally.

As a result, the federal government is working with the dates vaccine companies are providing them.

“We have reached out and have actually one of the very best vaccine portfolios of any country around the world with far more doses for Canadians, potentially then we actually have Canadian population. That’s because we don’t know which vaccines are going to be most effective, which ones are going to arrive early, but we have done everything we can to ensure that Canadians get these vaccines as quickly as possible,” Trudeau said, acknowledging Canada is at a “disadvantage,” because it is relying on other nations.

“But it is premature to start, you know, crossing out [or] circling dates on a calendar or saying that ‘this vaccine is going to arrive in this amount, on this day, in this community,’ because there’s still a lot of work to do between now and then, but we’re on it,” he said.

The prime minister said that Canada has begun funding domestic vaccine production capacity because “we never want to be caught short again,” but it will take “years” to get in place and likely won’t help Canada’s COVID-19 vaccine situation, but will be in place should there be future pandemics.

Updating on the status of the logistical planning, Procurement Minister Anita Anand said that the federal government has signed contracts for freezers capable of storing vaccines. To-date the government has the capacity to store up to 33.5 million vaccines at cold temperatures and enough needles and syringes to administer 24 million doses with more en route. By next week, Anand said she expects contracts will be awarded to provide the government with dry ice as well as end-to-end distribution to assist in the transportation of these vaccines.

The government says it’s keeping a close eye on the approval processes for vaccines in allied countries, but isn’t expected to fast-track authorization until the domestic evaluation is complete, which Trudeau said is being done to assure Canadians the vaccines are safe, in hopes that’ll encourage the maximum number of people get immunized.

Logistical planning about the rollout is underway, but details remain sparse other than the military likely playing a role and all provinces and territories needing to provide input. Trudeau said Tuesday, the federal Liberals will have more to share once the “mobilization plan” is “up and running.”

EMERGENCY THERAPY APPROVED

Over the weekend, Health Canada authorized the monoclonal antibody therapy for emergency use in helping treat COVID-19 infections, and Canada will begin receiving doses over the next three months.

The single antibody treatment called bamlanivimab has been approved for use in adults and children aged 12 or older with mild to moderate coronavirus infections.

Lilly says the treatment is for those who risk progressing to severe COVID-19 symptoms or hospitalization. It is not authorized for patients who are already hospitalized or require oxygen.

Bamlanivimab is the first monoclonal antibody to be authorized for use in treating the novel coronavirus and was granted emergency-use by the Food and Drug Administration in the U.S. at the beginning of November.

The antibody therapy, which must be infused in a hospital or other health-care setting, was developed in partnership with the Canadian biotech company AbCellera, which the federal government has provided funded to over the course of the pandemic.

“To the scientists and researchers across the country: Thank you for everything that you do. Just like always, your dedication and expertise is making Canadians heathier and safer, and is building a better tomorrow. Canada is lucky to have thousands of world-class scientists and researchers,” said Trudeau.

Health Canada granted authorization for Lilly’s antibody therapy under Section 3 of the federal government’s Interim Order Respecting the Importation, Sale and Advertising of Drugs for Use in Relation to COVID-19.

With files from CTV News’ Brooklyn Neustaeter

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