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Coronavirus Update: Tam warns against vaccine misinformation as survey reveals dissenters – The Globe and Mail

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Good evening, here are the coronavirus updates you need to know tonight.

Top headlines:

  1. Dr. Tam says misinformation online plays role in vaccine hesitancy after 14% said they were unlikely to get inoculated
  2. Families face tough decisions as school-going children are forced to isolate from grandparents
  3. FDA apologizes for overstating benefits of plasma treatment for COVID-19 patients

In Canada, there have been at least 125,969 cases reported. In the last week 2,814 new cases were announced, 3% more than the previous week. There have also been at least 112,047 recoveries and 9,090 deaths. Health officials have administered more than 5,544,879 tests.

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Worldwide, there have been at least 23,647,377 cases confirmed and 813,022 deaths reported.

Sources: Canada data is compiled from government websites, Johns Hopkins and COVID-19 Canada Open Data Working Group; international data is from Johns Hopkins University.


Coronavirus explainers: Updates and essential resourcesCoronavirus in maps and chartsLockdown rules and reopening plans in each provinceGlobal rules on mask-wearingBack to school


Photo of the day

In Miami, Florida, Sherina Jones set up a community refrigerator to help address the problem of food insecurity in the community. The fridges are set up in public areas for anyone to give or take food.

CHANDAN KHANNA/AFP/Getty Images


Number of the day

14 per cent

Some Canadians are worried about getting inoculated against COVID-19, a Statistics Canada survey suggests.

  • More than 76 per cent of respondents indicated they would likely get inoculated if and when a vaccine is ready. Yet 14 per cent said they were somewhat or very unlikely to do so. Nine per cent remained unsure.
  • Those who indicated they were unlikely to get a vaccine were asked to identify the reasons for their reluctance. More than half cited a lack of confidence in its safety while a similar number said they were worried about potential risks and side effects.

During a news conference Tuesday, Dr. Theresa Tam warned against the spread of online untruths about vaccines. Many experts and political leaders have touted the successful development and widespread rollout of a vaccine as essential for an eventual return to normalcy, including the full reopening of economies and ending physical distancing.


Coronavirus in Canada


In Ottawa, the government is committing $82.5-million for mental health support for Indigenous communities during the pandemic.

  • Some mental health services have moved online, posing a challenge for remote communities with limited internet access.
  • The government said the new funds are a response to community activism, will support increased access to services and help Indigenous partners in developing new ways to address substance use.

Also today: As millions of children across Canada head back to school, many parents are making the same decision to isolate their kids from their grandparents – at least until the risks of infection and transmission are overcome.

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COVID-19 and school: Students will soon return to the classroom and many parents, worried about measures being taken to prevent coronavirus spread, are fundraising money to purchase PPE, cleaning supplies, and air purifiers. But the fundraising efforts raise questions about widening inequalities in public education.


Coronavirus around the world

  • U.S. Food and Drug Administration Commissioner Stephen Hahn on Tuesday apologized for overstating the life-saving benefits of convalescent plasma among COVID-19 patients, just days after President Donald Trump praised the agency’s decision to issue an emergency authorization for the treatment.
  • Britain is facing pressure to encourage students to wear masks at school, at least in communal spaces, after the advice in Scotland was changed. Prime Minister Boris Johnson said his government is ready to follow suit and advise a change if the medical evidence deems it necessary.
  • Two patients, in Belgium and the Netherlands, are confirmed to have been reinfected with COVID-19. The cases have fuelled fears about the effectiveness of potential vaccines against the virus, though experts say there would need to be many more cases of reinfection for these to be justified.

Coronavirus and business

Bank of Montreal posted a better-than-expected third-quarter profit of $1.23-billion, even as the bank set aside more than $1-billion to cover potential loan losses.

  • The bank reported $1.05-billion in credit loss provisions, the second straight quarterly increase in funds set aside to cover loans that may go bad.
  • BMO added $446-million in provisions for loans that are already impaired, and $608-million for loan that are still being paid back but could become delinquent in future, based on economic models.
  • The bank is still allowing loan deferrals for clients in Canada the U.S., mostly of which are set to expire in the fiscal fourth quarter, which ends Oct. 31.

Scotiabank reported third-quarter profit of $1.3-billion, as it sets aside $2.2-billion to cover potential loan losses

  • Profit at Scotiabank fell 34 per cent, down from $1.98-billion last year.
  • The bank set aside set aside nearly $2.2-billion to cover potential loan losses, an increase of 206 per cent from a year ago.
  • More than four-fifths of the increase in provisions was to cover loans that are still being paid back but could suffer future losses, based on economic models.

Also today: U.S. bank profits slump 70 per cent as coronavirus weighs on businesses and households

And: Lessons from the Great Recession: 6 personal finance takeaways that still apply


More reporting


Distractions

Children’s entertainer Raffi jokes around with a banana following a news conference on Parliament Hill in 2002.

JONATHAN HAYWARD/THE CANADIAN PRESS

🎧 For the very young and formerly very young: Ring ring ring, banana phone. Is Raffi what the world needs right now?

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  • “I do appreciate people writing to me, trying to comfort me at times, even as I’m trying to comfort them.”

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Saskatchewan health officials fine person $2000 for not self-isolating while symptomatic – WellandTribune.ca

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REGINA—Saskatchewan health officials have fined a person $2,000 for not self-isolating while showing symptoms of COVID-19, bringing the total amount of penalties levied in the province to more than $20,000.

The Ministry of Health has not released specific details about the recent case, except to say the penalty was imposed after a contact tracing investigation.

“Public health is confident that all close contacts have been determined and contacted in this case,” reads a statement from the Ministry of Health.

Public health rules state people must isolate for 14 days if they return from international travel, are diagnosed with COVID-19 or have been close to someone who is positive.

Officials said the recent violation was of a section of the provincial public health order that states all symptomatic people who have been directed to get a COVID-19 test, or are awaiting their results, must isolate until they are no longer deemed a risk.

The Saskatchewan Health Authority said asymptomatic people being tested are only required to self-monitor.

“As there is no further public risk, we will not be releasing additional information about this enforcement,” said the statement.

A spokesperson said officials have issued four fines related to violations around COVID-19 precautions, including the one announced Thursday.

Recently, an organizer of a private gathering at a home in Saskatoon, where about 47 people attended, was fined $2,000. Another $2,000 fine was handed to a person who didn’t self-isolate, despite being positive for COVID-19.

A $10,000 penalty was given to a business that was open when restrictions were in place.

“Fines are not our first choice; we want people to be responsible and protect their health and the health of the friends, family and community,” Colleen Book said in an email.

“There can be very serious consequences for not following Public Health Orders and we are seeing increasing transmission rates in Saskatchewan and across the country as a result of social gatherings (weddings, parties etc.). This is putting our schools, businesses and health facilities at risk.”

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Saskatchewan reported five new infections on Thursday. Officials said of the more than 1,800 cases reported to date in the province, 130 are believed to be active.

There are 24 active infections of children since schools reopened earlier this month.

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Saskatchewan officials fine person $2000 for not self-isolating while symptomatic – The Observer

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REGINA — Saskatchewan health officials have fined a person $2,000 for not self-isolating while showing symptoms of COVID-19, bringing the total amount of penalties levied in the province to more than $20,000.

The Ministry of Health has not released specific details about the recent case, except to say the penalty was imposed after a contact tracing investigation.

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“Public health is confident that all close contacts have been determined and contacted in this case,” reads a statement from the Ministry of Health.

Public health rules state people must isolate for 14 days if they return from international travel, are diagnosed with COVID-19 or have been close to someone who is positive.

Officials said the recent violation was of a section of the provincial public health order that states all symptomatic people who have been directed to get a COVID-19 test, or are awaiting their results, must isolate until they are no longer deemed a risk.

The Saskatchewan Health Authority said asymptomatic people being tested are only required to self-monitor.

“As there is no further public risk, we will not be releasing additional information about this enforcement,” said the statement.

A spokeswoman said officials have issued four fines related to violations around COVID-19 precautions, including the one announced Thursday.

Recently, an organizer of a private gathering at a home in Saskatoon, where about 47 people attended, was fined $2,000. Another $2,000 fine was handed to a person who didn’t self-isolate, despite being positive for COVID-19.

A $10,000 penalty was given to a business that was open when restrictions were in place.

“Fines are not our first choice; we want people to be responsible and protect their health and the health of the friends, family and community,” Colleen Book said in an email.

“There can be very serious consequences for not following Public Health Orders and we are seeing increasing transmission rates in Saskatchewan and across the country as a result of social gatherings (weddings, parties etc.). This is putting our schools, businesses and health facilities at risk.”

Saskatchewan reported five new infections on Thursday. Officials said of the more than 1,800 cases reported to date in the province, 130 are believed to be active.

There are 24 active infections of children since schools reopened earlier this month.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Sept. 24, 2020

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Manitoba murder trial to continue with 11 jurors after one shows COVID-19 symptoms. – Nanaimo News NOW

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Queen’s Bench Justice Vic Toews told the jury Thursday he received advice from public health that it is safe and prudent to continue.

Toews says even if the juror tests positive, it doesn’t mean the remaining jurors would need to self-isolate given the steps taken in court, which include physical distancing.

“It is not prudent to wait any longer,” said Toews.

Moar, 23, is accused of killing Hibi at the foster home he ran for boys.

Jury trials were suspended across the country in the spring as the justice system grappled with how to handle the pandemic.

They resumed in Manitoba earlier this month with Moar’s trial.

The court put several protocols in place. Jury selections have been held in a large convention centre, there has been physical distancing in courtrooms and masks became mandatory after an employee at the Winnipeg courthouse tested positive for the novel coronavirus.

Toews said Wednesday that he was optimistic that jurors would soon hear his charge in the case before beginning deliberations on a verdict. (CTV Winnipeg, The Canadian Press)

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Sept. 24, 2020.

The Canadian Press

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