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Coronavirus: What's happening in Canada and around the world on Sunday – CBC.ca

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The latest:

  • Deputy PM in self-isolation following COVID-19 app exposure notification.
  • Macabre Halloween display left near Manitoba premier’s house as reminder of COVID-19 deaths.
  • U.K. cabinet minister says lockdown in England could be extended.
  • Turkish politician in Erdogan’s party dies from COVID-19.
  • Have a coronavirus question or news tip for CBC News? Email us at COVID@cbc.ca.

Ontario and Quebec are still reporting the highest daily counts in Canada for new cases of COVID-19, while farther west in Manitoba, officials have again reported hundreds of new cases as its capital city gets set for tighter restrictions.

Ontario reported 977 new cases on Sunday. In the province’s hot spots, there are 279 more cases in Toronto, 238 in Peel Region, 130 in Ottawa and 113 in York Region. The overall number was down from 1,015 new cases reported on Saturday.

Quebec added 965 new cases of COVID-19 on Sunday, down from 1,064 the previous day.

Manitoba’s new case count of 349 on Saturday was down from the record-smashing 480 reported Friday, but was still much higher than the province’s previous new-case record of 193 set Thursday.

Starting Monday, bars and restaurants in Winnipeg can open only for pickup or takeout, while facilities such as movie theatres, museums and libraries must close.

The measures, along with others, will last two weeks and be reassessed at that time.

Business in the St. Norbert Hotel bar in Winnipeg on Saturday was “average as it gets through these COVID times,” president Gerald Lambert said, although sales at the hotel’s beer store were brisk as people appeared to be getting set to drink at home.

“There’s other facilities that have far worse reports that are still allowed to be open, albeit at smaller capacity,” Lambert said, echoing the frustration many in his industry have expressed at the provincial government.

“In two weeks, I don’t know if this is going to make a difference or not.”

But Premier Brian Pallister also faced pressure Saturday from others who feel the new restrictions need to go further, with one group placing dozens of cardboard tombstones on the grass median outside his home.

A group of community members set up a display near the home of Manitoba Premier Brian Pallister, criticizing the government’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic. This tombstone refers to Parkview Place care home in Winnipeg, the site of the province’s deadliest COVID-19 outbreak. (CBC)

The Halloween-themed protest included epithets on the tombstones indicating people were dying from Manitoba’s reopening plan.

“I respect the right of any Manitobans to peacefully protest and encourage all who choose to do so safely to protect their health and that of others as well,” Pallister said in a statement issued Saturday.

Manitoba also reported four new deaths from COVID 19. Quebec reported 15 and Ontario reported nine.

Federal Finance Minister Chrystia Freeland, meanwhile, tweeted Saturday that she’d just gotten a COVID-19 test after receiving an exposure notification from the COVID Alert app and is waiting for the results.

“I am isolating at home while I wait for the results of the test,” she wrote. “My thanks to our excellent health-care professionals.”

An exposure notification from the COVID Alert app prompted Deputy Prime Minister Chrystia Freeland to reveal on Saturday that she is self-isolating. (Sean Kilpatrick/The Canadian Press)

The COVID Alert app notifies users when someone who they’ve been in contact with tests positive for COVID-19.

There have been about 4.9 million downloads of the federal COVID-19 exposure notification app so far, with 2,939 Canadians using it to log a positive coronavirus test.

WATCH | Why Alta., B.C. haven’t adopted COVID Alert app:

Only five million Canadians have downloaded the COVID Alert app in three months, partly because it’s not active in Alberta and British Columbia. Officials in B.C. want the app to give more information about COVID-19 exposure while Alberta has been delayed by its own app. 1:57

Canada’s Chief Public Health Officer Dr. Theresa Tam stressed again Saturday that it’s important to continue with precautions to keep everyone safe and to lessen the burden on essential workers.

“Many of you [essential workers] have been on the front lines since the beginning, putting yourselves in harm’s way,” she said in a statement. “As individuals, we have an important role to play to minimize the COVID-19 burden on essential workers.”


What’s happening in the rest of Canada 

As of 11 a.m. ET on Sunday, Canada had 236,454 confirmed or presumptive coronavirus cases. Provinces and territories listed 197,656 as recovered or resolved. A CBC News tally of deaths based on provincial reports, regional health information and CBC’s reporting stood at 10,171.

Saskatchewan announced 78 new cases on Saturday. Meanwhile, Moose Jaw police fined a person $2,800 for allegedly hosting a party “well over” the province’s 15-person limit for private gatherings.

Manitoba saw 349 new cases, along with four more deaths. One of the deaths — a woman in her 90s — is linked to an outbreak at Maples Personal Care Home in Winnipeg. The other people in Winnipeg who died are a woman in her 50s, a man in his 60s and a man in his 80s.

PHOTOS | Montrealers celebrate Halloween amid pandemic:

Nova Scotia recorded five new infections, bringing the total active cases into double digits for the first time since June. There are now 11 active cases of the virus in the province.

In Newfoundland and Labrador, Vale announced a presumptive case at the Voisey’s Bay mine site in northern Labrador, with the Department of Health working to complete additional testing.

In New Brunswick, a school in Woodstock announced a case of COVID-19. Townsview School, which has about 600 students in grades K-8, will remain open on Monday as health officials conduct contact tracing.

In Yukon, the territory on Friday reported its first death. Yukon’s Chief Medical Officer of Health Dr. Brendan Hanley said the individual was “older” and had “significant underlying medical conditions.”


What’s happening around the world

A database maintained by Johns Hopkins University put the cumulative number of COVID-19 cases reported around the world since the pandemic began at more than 46.1 million as of Sunday morning, with more than 30.8 million of those listed as recovered. The death toll reported by the U.S.-based university stood at nearly 1.2 million.

Iran hit another single-day record for coronavirus deaths on Sunday. The country’s Health Ministry said 434 people had died from the novel virus in 24 hours, bringing Iran’s death toll in the pandemic to more than 35,000. Iran has reported more than 620,000 confirmed COVID-19 cases in all.

Tehran’s city council has proposed a two-week lockdown of the Iranian capital. For the past three weeks, Iran has banned weddings and funeral gatherings, and closed universities, schools, libraries, mosques, cinemas, museums and beauty salons in an attempt to curb the spread of the virus in Tehran.

Iranians walk next to a sign advising people to wear masks as they shop in Tajrish Square in the capital Tehran on Sunday. (Atta Kenare/AFP via Getty Images)

In Turkey, a politician from President Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s ruling party has died from the coronavirus.

Burhan Kuzu, 65, had been receiving treatment for COVID-19 since Oct. 17, the country’s health minister tweeted. He died Sunday.

Statistics from the country’s Health Ministry show at least 10,252 people have died from COVID-19 in Turkey.

In the U.K., a new national lockdown for England may have to last longer than the planned four weeks if coronavirus infection rates don’t fall quickly enough, a British cabinet minister said Sunday.

The lockdown is due to run from Thursday until Dec. 2. Prime Minister Boris Johnson said it is needed to stop hospitals from becoming overwhelmed by COVID-19 patients within weeks.

Cabinet minister Michael Gove said that “with a virus this malignant, and with its capacity to move so quickly, it would be foolish to predict with absolute certainty what will happen in four weeks’ time.”

WATCH | England to enter 2nd lockdown as U.K. cases top 1 million:

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson has announced a new month-long lockdown for England. He says current COVID-19 infection rates threaten to overwhelm hospitals in weeks without intervention. 2:34

Under the new restrictions, bars and restaurants can only offer takeout, non-essential shops must close and people will only be able to leave home for a short list of reasons, including exercise.

Britain is recording more than 20,000 new COVID-19 infections a day and has Europe’s highest coronavirus death toll at
more than 46,000.

In Australia, audiences were returning to the theatres at the Sydney Opera House this weekend, eight months after the iconic entertainment venue was forced to close its doors to the public due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Australia has recorded no new locally transmitted coronavirus infections for the first time in five months.

Staff are seen wearing face masks as they greet guests on arrival for the Don Burrows: A Celebration of Life Through Jazz show in the Joan Sutherland Theatre at the Sydney Opera House on Sunday. (Lisa Maree Williams/Getty Images)

In Melbourne, the capital of Victoria state, which had the highest number of cases in the country, residents were enjoying the first weekend of cafés, restaurants and pubs reopening to walk-in customers.

The city has only one mystery case without a known source. There are 61 active cases left across the state, down from 70 on Saturday.

India reported 46,964 new confirmed coronavirus cases in the past 24 hours, keeping a month-long downward trend in infections.

India’s Health Ministry on Sunday also registered 470 more deaths, taking total fatalities up to 122,111. The latest surge takes the country’s total virus tally to close to 8.2 million and is only behind the United States.

India saw a steep rise in cases in July, but it is experiencing a slower pace of coronavirus spread since mid-September, when daily infections touched a record of 97,894. But health experts warn that mask and physical-distancing fatigue is setting in and can lead to a fresh wave of infections.

Some experts question the country’s testing methods and warn that a major festival due in a few weeks, as well as the winter season, could result in a new burst of infections.

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Coronavirus: What's happening in Canada and around the world on Tuesday – CBC.ca

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The latest:

Alberta’s hospital system is under “significant strain” and is adding intensive care beds as it faces an increase in COVID-19 cases, a medical director for the Edmonton area says.

Health officials reported 1,733 new cases of COVID-19 on Monday, a record high that brought the number of active cases in the province to 16,454. The province also saw record-high COVID-19 hospitalizations, with 453 people in hospital, including 96 in ICU.

Dr. David Zygun, of Alberta Health Services, said Monday that the province had planned for the increased demand and was now “executing those plans as the demand increases.”

The province has 173 general adult ICU beds and has plans to expand up to 425 ICU beds, Zygun said at a COVID-19 briefing.

“Over the last week in Edmonton, we’ve added an additional 20 beds,” he said. “Over the weekend in Calgary, we have another 10 beds.”

Hospitals are also cohorting patients and making use of decomissioned and unused spaces as health services works to add beds to help with the COVID-19 response.

“Obviously we hope that they won’t be needed but we are working not only to supply them but also to staff them,” Zygun said.

Alberta’s leaders have faced criticism from some in the medical community who say that public health measures imposed by the province aren’t strong enough to slow the spread of the novel virus.


What’s happening across Canada

As of 10:20 a.m. ET on Tuesday, Canada’s COVID-19 case count stood at 379,846 with 66,364 of those considered active cases. A CBC News tally of deaths based on provincial reports, regional health information and CBC’s reporting stood at 12,137.

Ontario Health Minister Christine Elliott said Tuesday that the province reported 1,707 new cases of COVID-19, with 727 in Toronto and 373 in Peel Region.

In British Columbia, the province announced the highest number of COVID-19 deaths for a three-day period as it recorded 46 fatalities over the weekend.

Provincial Health Officer Dr. Bonnie Henry addressed those who have lost loved ones in the pandemic, saying “we all feel your loss and mourn with you.”

“These people have faces, have names, have stories. This tragedy is all of our tragedy,” Henry said. “If you are thinking it may be OK to bend the rules, please remember this virus takes lives.”

As of Monday, a statement from Henry and Dix said there were 316 people with COVID-19 in hospital, including 75 in intensive care.

Saskatchewan Premier Scott Moe said Monday it’s too early to say whether COVID-19 restrictions will be loosened in time to allow families to gather for the holidays. Moe said residents can expect to see high COVID-19 case numbers for the next few weeks, as officials wait to see if the latest public health measures have been effective.

The province reported 325 new infections on Monday and said there are 123 people in hospital, 23 of whom are receiving intensive care.

In Manitoba, health officials reported 343 new cases of COVID-19 on Monday and 11 additional deaths. The province, which has been dealing with a surge in cases, said 342 people were hospitalized with COVID-19, with 43 in intensive care units.

LISTEN | Prime Minister Justin Trudeau joins host Matt Galloway to talk about COVID-19, vaccines and the cost of fighting the pandemic:

The Current13:17Justin Trudeau on the cost of fighting the pandemic

After yesterday’s fiscal update, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau joins Matt Galloway to discuss the cost of fighting COVID-19, and how his government plans to roll out the vaccines that could finally subdue the pandemic. 13:17

Quebec reported 1,333 new COVID-19 infections and 23 more deaths linked to the novel coronavirus on Monday.

The province’s Health Department said there are 693 patients hospitalized with COVID-19, 28 more than the previous day. Ninety-four people were in intensive care, an increase of two.

In Atlantic Canada, Nova Scotia reported 16 new cases of COVID-19 on Monday, New Brunswick reported six new cases and Newfoundland and Labrador reported one new case. There were no new cases reported in Prince Edward Island.

Across the North, there were four new cases of COVID-19 reported in Nunavut on Monday, while one new case was reported in Yukon. A mask mandate for indoor public spaces goes into effect in Yukon on Tuesday. 

There were no new cases reported in the Northwest Territories, which has seen 15 cases to date.


What’s happening around the world

From The Associated Press and Reuters, last updated at 10:15 a.m. ET

As of early Tuesday morning, more than 63.3 million cases of COVID-19 had been reported worldwide, with more than 40.6 million of those cases listed as recovered or resolved in a tracking tool maintained by Johns Hopkins University. The global death toll stood at more than 1.4 million.

In the Asia-Pacific region, Vietnam reported two more coronavirus cases on Tuesday linked to a rare domestic infection in its commercial hub Ho Chi Minh City, while the government urged public vigilance and tighter enforcement of health measures.

The Southeast Asian nation is back on high alert after confirming on Monday the country’s first community infection in 89 days, prompting the closure of several places in the densely populated southern city.

The latest cases have been traced back to a flight attendant, who had been kept inside a quarantine facility for five days before being released to self-isolate at home.

“The flight attendant contracted the virus inside the quarantine area then spread it to others during his home-quarantine time,” Health Minister Nguyen Thanh Long said in a government statement.

“It’s the first ever time such a thing happened. The flight attendant seriously violated quarantine regulations.”

A woman wearing a face mask checks her smartphone while waiting on her scooter along a street in Hanoi on Tuesday, a day after Vietnam reported its first local transmission case of COVID-19 in nearly three months. (Manan Vatsyayana/AFP/Getty Images)

With its usually strict quarantine and tracking measures, Vietnam has managed to quickly contain its coronavirus outbreaks, allowing it to resume its economic activities earlier than much of Asia.

Vietnam crushed its first wave of coronavirus infections in April and went nearly 100 days without local transmission until the virus re-emerged in the central tourist city of Danang in July and spread widely, before being contained in a few weeks.

Late on Tuesday, Vietnamese Prime Minister Nguyen Xuan Phuc said Vietnam would suspend all inbound commercial flights following the new outbreak. Flights for some foreign experts who do business in Vietnam had been operating throughout the pandemic.

In Europe, nonessential shops in Belgium were reopening Tuesday in the wake of encouraging figures about declining daily coronavirus infection rates and hospital admissions.

The government is fearful, however, that the change might lead to massive gatherings in the nation’s most popular shopping centres and streets. Over the weekend, pre-Christmas light festivals already led to crowded scenes in several cities, prompting warnings from virologists about the dangers of reopening too soon.

Belgium, host to the headquarters of the 27-nation European Union, has been one of the hardest-hit countries in Europe during the pandemic. Belgium has reported more than 16,500 deaths linked to the virus during two surges in the spring and the fall.

A shopkeeper wearing a protective mask adjusts a display before the reopening of the shops qualified as non-essential in a shopping mall in Brussels, Belgium, on Tuesday. (Yves Herman/Reuters)

Under the new rules, shopping has to be done alone or with a minor or a dependant person. Time in a shop is limited to half an hour. Restaurants and bars remain closed.

France, meanwhile, recorded 4,005 new COVID-19 infections on Monday, the smallest rise since August, even as hospitalizations remained high.

In the Americas, the United States entered the final month of the year hoping that promising vaccine candidates will soon be approved to halt the rapidly spreading novel coronavirus after 4.2 million new cases were reported in November.

The new COVID-19 cases were more than double the previous monthly record set in October, as large numbers of Americans still refuse to wear masks and continue to gather in holiday crowds, against the recommendation of experts.

In an aerial view from a drone, cars are lined up at Dodger Stadium for COVID-19 testing on the Monday after Thanksgiving weekend in Los Angeles. (Mario Tama/Getty Images)

With outgoing President Donald Trump’s coronavirus strategy relying heavily on a vaccine, a Food and Drug Administration panel of outside advisers will meet on Dec. 10 to discuss whether to recommend the FDA authorize emergency use of a vaccine developed by Pfizer Inc.

A second candidate from Moderna Inc. could follow a week later, officials have said, raising hopes that Americans could start receiving inoculations before the end of the year, although widespread vaccinations could take months.

California’s governor, meanwhile, said he may renew a stay-at-home order in coming days, while families of 15 public school students sued the state, saying it has failed to provide equal education to poor and minority children during the pandemic.

In the Middle East, Lebanon’s economy faces an “arduous and prolonged depression,” with real GPD projected to plunge by nearly 20 per cent because its politicians refuse to implement reforms that would speed up the country’s recovery, the World Bank said Tuesday.

It said Lebanon should quickly form a reform-minded government to urgently carry out changes. The crash of the local currency has already led to triple-digit inflation. The dire projections by the World Bank, including a 19.2 per cent drop in gross domestic product this year alone, come as Lebanon suffers its worst economic and financial crisis in its modern history, posing a threat to the country’s stability.

The crisis began a year ago and worsened with the spread of coronavirus and the massive blast at Beirut’s port, which destroyed the facility, killed more than 200 people and caused widespread destruction.

Iran remained the hardest hit country in the region, with more than 975,000 recorded cases of COVID-19 and more than 48,600 deaths.

In Africa, deaths from malaria due to disruptions during the pandemic to services designed to tackle the mosquito-borne disease will far exceed those from COVID-19 in sub-Saharan Africa, the World Health Organization warned. South Africa remained the hardest-hit country in Africa, with more than 790,000 recorded cases of COVID-19 and more than 21,500 deaths.

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Canadians offer mixed confidence in government's vaccine rollout: Nanos survey – CTV News

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TORONTO —
Just one in six Canadians are confident in the federal government’s rollout of a COVID-19 vaccine once one becomes available, according to the latest data from Nanos Research.

The survey, commissioned by CTV News and released on Monday, asked 1,096 Canadians how confident they are that the government has a “a well organized plan to deliver COVID-19 vaccines to Canadians as quickly as possible” and found that just 16 per cent of respondents said they are “confident,” while another 40 per cent said they are “somewhat confident.”

“It’s very early in this process and I think until we actually see more details and there’s more meat on the bone, I expect (the vaccine rollout is) still going to be a bit of a question mark for many Canadians,” Nik Nanos, the chair of Nanos Research, told CTV’s Power Play.

When broken down regionally, respondents from Quebec offered the most confidence, with 73 per cent of respondents indicating that they are either confident or somewhat confident, while respondents in the Prairies had the least confidence, with 29 per cent indicating they are “not confident” in the vaccine rollout.

On Monday, Moderna Inc. said its testing shows that their COVID-19 vaccine is 94 per cent effective. The company is currently under a “rolling review” process with Health Canada, but has already asked for a emergency use approval in the United States and Europe.

Last week, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau named Maj.-Gen. Dany Fortin to lead Canada’s vaccine rollout, with the goal of immunizing half of Canadians by September 2021.

Nanos says that substantial details in the fiscal update about the vaccine rollout will go a long way towards curbing any skepticism from Canadians.

“Anything said relating to the funding of vaccines, the logistics of vaccines, the distribution, the role that the federal government’s going to take working with provinces, is probably going to be very well met, but if they don’t talk about those things, it’s just going to create a greater level uncertainty about the future,” he said.

With files from The Associated Press

METHODOLOGY

Nanos conducted an RDD dual frame (land-and cell-lines) hybrid telephone and online random survey of 1,096 Canadians, 18 years of age or older, between November 26th and 29th, 2020 as part of an omnibus survey. Participants were randomly recruited by telephone using live agents and administered a survey online. The sample included both land-and cell-lines across Canada. The results were statistically checked and weighted by age and gender using the latest Census information and the sample is geographically stratified to be representative of Canada.

Individuals were randomly called using random digit dialing with a maximum of five call backs.

The margin of error for this survey is ±3.0 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

This study was commissioned by CTV News and the research was conducted by Nanos Research.

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Canadians now owe more than $2 trillion, Equifax says – CBC.ca

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Consumer demand for credit intensified in the third quarter, driven chiefly by increases in mortgage balances and new auto loans, according to data released Monday by credit reporting agency Equifax.

Mortgage balances and new auto loans were up 6.6 per cent and 11.7 per cent year over year, respectively, according to Equifax. Overall average consumer debt increased 3.3 per cent compared with the third quarter of last year.

Rebecca Oakes, assistant vice-president of advanced analytics at Equifax Canada, said in an interview that growth in mortgages last quarter was especially high, with the largest increase among people under 35. That trend comes even as economic fallout from the pandemic and associated lockdown measures hit young people especially hard.

“In terms of new mortgages, that could be refinancing, or it could be brand-new, first-time home buyers or it could be people moving house,” Oakes said. “That was actually the highest value that we’ve seen ever.”

The increased demand for auto loans in the third quarter could have been a result of pent-up demand from people who had to wait to buy cars later in the year, Oakes said.

Total debt $2 trillion

The figures in Equifax’s report are drawn from banks and other lenders that provide data to the credit rating agency.

Equifax pegged total consumer debt at $2.04 trillion, while Statistics Canada reported in June that household debt had reached $2.3 trillion, with $1.77 in debt for every dollar of household disposable income.

More than three million consumers have chosen to use payment deferral programs since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, according to Equifax. Since the start of this year, some banks have offered consumers the option to suspend their loan payments for several months, in recognition of the financial strain the pandemic has created for many households.

However, under the payment deferral programs, interest continues to accrue during the months for which payments are suspended.

The percentage of balances where credit users have missed three or more payments was at its lowest level since 2014, with deferral programs likely masking the true delinquency rates, according to Oakes.

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