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Coronavirus: What's happening in Canada and around the world on Wednesday – CBC.ca

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The latest:

The World Health Organization says the number of coronavirus cases ticked up worldwide last week even as the weekly count of COVID-19 deaths dropped to the lowest level since October.

The UN health agency, in its latest weekly epidemiological report on the pandemic, also said on Wednesday that its 53-country European region reported a “sharp increase” — 30 per cent — in infection incidence, while Africa registered a 23 per cent rise in mortality from COVID-19 during the period.

All WHO regions except the Americas — one of the hardest-hit regions — and Southeast Asia posted an increase in deaths over the last week, the agency said in a statement.

More than 2.6 million new COVID-19 cases were reported between June 28 and July 4, a slight increase on the previous week, while the tally of deaths registered over the week declined seven per cent to 54,000, WHO said. That was the lowest such weekly figure since October.

WHO said most new cases were reported in Brazil and India — though weekly case counts in those two countries were declining — as well as Colombia, followed by Indonesia and Britain, which each tallied a weekly increase in cases.

When asked at a briefing about reopening efforts around the world, WHO official Dr. Mike Ryan urged governments to open up “very carefully” to avoid losing the gains made in slowing the spread of COVID-19.

The virus is changing, Ryan said, and “we need to be very, very careful at this moment.”

-From The Associated Press and CBC News, last updated at 11:10 a.m. ET


What’s happening across Canada

WATCH | COVID-19 vaccine booster being considered for the most vulnerable: 

As more Canadians get vaccinated against COVID-19, now the discussion is turning toward a possible third dose. A booster shot, not necessarily for everyone, could potentially help control the spread of variants of concern, including delta. 2:01

As of 12:25 p.m. ET on Wednesday, Canada had reported 1,418,388 confirmed cases of COVID-19, with 5,463 considered active. National deaths stood at 26,382. More than 40.3 million COVID-19 vaccine doses have been administered so far across the country, according to CBC’s vaccine tracker.

Across the North on Wednesday, there were no new cases of COVID-19 reported in Nunavut. Health officials in the Northwest Territories and Yukon had not provided any updated information for the day.

In Quebec, health officials on Wednesday reported one additional death and 103 new cases of COVID-19.

Ontario on Wednesday reported 194 new cases of COVID-19 and no additional deaths. The update came a day after the province’s top doctor called for all eligible young people to be vaccinated against COVID-19 ahead of school’s return in September. Dr. Kieran Moore said Tuesday that classes in Ontario schools are due to pick up in less than two months with the goal of holding more in-person classes.

In Manitoba, which had not yet announced updated figures on Wednesday, the government said new COVID-19 public health orders will come next week. The announcement comes after Manitoba surpassed vaccination targets, including 50 per cent of people aged 12 and up having both doses of a vaccine.

Premier Brian Pallister also announced a plan for widespread walk-in vaccine clinics next week.

In Atlantic Canada, there were eight new cases of COVID-19 on Tuesday, with seven in Nova Scotia and one in Prince Edward Island. There were no new cases reported in Newfoundland and Labrador or New Brunswick.

Saskatchewan reported one death Tuesday and 14 additional cases of COVID-19. 

In Alberta, health officials reported two additional deaths and 33 new cases of COVID-19.

In British Columbia, there were no new deaths reported on Tuesday. Health officials said there were 46 new cases of the disease caused by the novel coronavirus.

-From CBC News and The Canadian Press, last updated at 12:25 p.m. ET


What’s happening around the world

People study in the Rose Main Reading Room of the New York Public Library on Tuesday in New York City. The New York Public Library reopened for in-person visitors for the first time since the pandemic shut down its branches in March 2020. (Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images)

As of early Wednesday morning, more than 184.6 million COVID-19 cases had been reported worldwide, according to Johns Hopkins University’s tracking tool. The reported global death toll stood at more than 3.9 million.

In the Americas, President Joe Biden said the rise of a more transmissible COVID-19 variant in the U.S. “should cause everybody to think twice.” Speaking Tuesday at the White House as he outlined his administration’s summer plans to boost vaccinations, Biden said the delta variant first identified in India is now responsible for a majority of new virus cases in much of the country.

“It seems to me it should cause everybody to think twice, and it should cause reconsideration especially among young people,” he said, referencing the demographic least at risk of negative outcomes from the virus.

The people who helped get New York City through the coronavirus pandemic will be honoured with a parade. City officials say the event Wednesday will honour a range of people, including workers in health care, transportation, education and infrastructure. The parade is kicking off at Battery Park and will travel up Broadway in lower Manhattan, the iconic stretch known as the Canyon of Heroes.

Mexican health authorities, meanwhile, reported on Tuesday the biggest jump in new daily coronavirus infections since late February.

In Africa, Zimbabwe has returned to strict lockdown measures to combat a resurgence of COVID-19 amid vaccine shortages. Infections have dramatically increased in recent weeks despite a night curfew, reduced business hours, localized lockdowns in hot spot areas and bans on inter-city travel.

The country’s information minister announced the virus has spread to rural areas, which have sparse health facilities. Information Minister Monica Mutsvangwa announced after a cabinet meeting that most people must stay at home, similar to restrictions on movement adopted in March last year when towns and cities became almost deserted.

Zimbabwe is one of more than 14 African countries where the delta variant is quickly spreading.

In the Asia-Pacific region, 12 Indian government ministers resigned Wednesday, hours ahead of an expected reshuffle of Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s cabinet aimed at refurbishing its image after widespread criticism of its handling of the COVID-19 pandemic.

India has recorded 400,000 coronavirus deaths since the pandemic began — the third most of any country. New cases are on the decline after exceeding 400,000 a day in May, but authorities are preparing for another possible wave and are trying to ramp up vaccinations.

A two-week-old pandemic lockdown in Australia’s biggest city is being extended for another week due to the vulnerability of a population largely unvaccinated against the coronavirus.

New South Wales state Premier Gladys Berejiklian said Wednesday that health experts recommended pushing the lockdown in Sydney on to midnight July 16. Only nine per cent of Australian adults are fully vaccinated, heightening fears that the delta variant of the coronavirus could quickly spread beyond control.

People wait in a queue outside a COVID-19 vaccination centre in a suburb of Sydney on Wednesday as the city extends a coronavirus lockdown for at least another week. (Saeed Khan/AFP/Getty Images)

Authorities in China’s southwestern province of Yunnan reported 15 new confirmed locally transmitted coronavirus cases for July 6, with all cases in the city of Ruili, bordering Myanmar.

South Korea reported its second-highest number of daily new COVID-19 cases ever on Wednesday, just days after it began easing physical distancing restrictions in some parts of the country.

In the Middle East, health officials in Kuwait on Tuesday reported 1,993 new cases of COVID-19 and 20 additional deaths — including 19 deaths in people who were unvaccinated, local media reported.

In Europe, fully vaccinated travellers arriving from countries on Britain’s “amber list” are set to avoid quarantine from as early as July 19, British media reported.

-From Reuters, The Associated Press and CBC News, last updated at 9 a.m. ET

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All three levels of government, police, organizers granted full standing on inquiry

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OTTAWA — The commissioner of the inquiry examining Ottawa’s use of the Emergencies Act to bring an end to the so-called “Freedom Convoy” protest in February has granted standing to the organizers, police and representatives of all three levels of government.

The decision by Paul Rouleau means those granted standing will be given advance notice on information submitted into evidence before the inquiry, and also gives them certain privileges, such as the opportunity to suggest or cross-examine witnesses.

Those granted full standing in the public inquiry include the federal, Alberta and Saskatchewan governments, the cities of Ottawa and Windsor, Ont., the Ottawa Police Service, Ontario Provincial Police and the organizers of the convoy, including Tamara Lich, Tom Marazzo and Chris Barber.

Former Ottawa Police Chief Peter Sloly will be allowed to produce documents, make submissions on factual, evidentiary and policy-related issues and examine witnesses, and the Manitoba government has been granted permission to provide written submissions.

However, Rouleau denied standing to the Conservative Party of Canada and several participants of the protests, some of whom had their bank accounts frozen under the Act.

Rouleau said it is important that the inquiry remain an independent, non-partisan process, noting there is also the Special Joint Committee of the Senate and House of Commons on the Declaration of Emergency reviewing the use of the Act’s powers.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published June 27, 2022.

 

The Canadian Press

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Ottawa police say they're ready to shut down Canada Day occupation attempts – CBC.ca

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Ottawa city officials say they are prepared for a “unique” Canada Day, with plans to keep anti-government protests from turning into another occupation.

The traditional nationally broadcast shows are returning for the first time since 2019, this time from the plaza in front of the Canadian War Museum because of ongoing construction on Parliament Hill.

Ottawa police say they expect more protests and larger crowds than usual during Canada Day celebrations as groups related to the Freedom Convoy continue to plan demonstrations. Some in those groups have indicated they’d like to protest through July and August.

“This is expected to be a unique Canada Day, with larger crowds and a larger event footprint,” interim Ottawa police Chief Steve Bell said during a Monday news conference.

WATCH | Interim police Chief Steve Bell talks about plans for Canada Day 

Police promise ‘swift and decisive’ action against any Canada Day occupation attempts

13 hours ago

Duration 0:37

Steve Bell, interim Ottawa police chief, says protesters will not be allowed to set up structures like sheds or tents, or have their own dance parties on city streets.

“We’ve developed our plans in the shadow of the unlawful protests and Rolling Thunder event. We’ve been speaking with community members and businesses and we’re very aware of the lingering trauma and concern about what they’re hearing after those events.”

Bell said officers will allow legal protests while shutting down illegal activities, including setting up structures or speakers without a permit and the threat of occupation, like on downtown streets in the winter.

He said police have been following online commentary and trying to talk to people who’ve said they’re coming to protest.

Two police officers escort someone away.
Police take a person into custody as they worked to clear an area on Rideau Street during a convoy-style protest participants called Rolling Thunder in Ottawa April 29, 2022. (Justin Tang/The Canadian Press)

“[We’ve] planned, we’re prepared and we have the resources,” Bell replied when answering a question about whether police were ready to step in again like they did in late April, when attempts to gather near the Rideau Centre mall were shut down by officers.

Provincial police and the RCMP have offered help to shut down occupation attempts as long as there’s a risk, he said.

The Ottawa Police Services Board received an update on plans for Canada Day when it met Monday evening.

Bell spoke about the toll recent months have taken on officers, noting the demand is not “sustainable” and describing police as “fatigued” ahead of the long weekend.

“For this event we’ve actually had to cancel days off, we’ve cancelled discretionary time off, called people back from annual leave,” said the chief. “This is an all hands on deck event, but that has a cost on the health and wellbeing of our members.”

At least 5 days of traffic control

Last week, Ottawa Mayor Jim Watson told people thinking of coming to the capital “not to be intimidated by individuals who may be coming to Ottawa to cause trouble.”

He said Monday he wants this to be a safe, festive event for children and families and that people who “come to disrupt” will be dealt with, without a warning.

Bell told the police board that the force has been clear with its expectations for demonstrators, and that harassment won’t be tolerated.

“If there is a hate or bias crime incidents, if there’s intimidation or threats, we will actively investigate those,” he said, adding police know residents have “scars” from the occupation.

“I want to reassure you that those feelings, that trauma that our community has felt is front and centre in all of our planning efforts and will be front and centre in our response efforts.”

Overall, Bell said police are expecting hundreds of thousands of people downtown. For comparison, an estimated 56,000 people went to the shows on Parliament Hill in 2019 and that doesn’t count everyone celebrating nearby.

About 16,000 people attended the noon show on the Hill in 2019. (CBC News)

There will be the traditional Canada Day road closures Friday July 1 and early Saturday, though there are more closures near LeBreton Flats because of that change in show location.

But Ottawa police are establishing another “vehicle exclusion zone” — similar to what was set up in late April for the Rolling Thunder motorcycle rally — with no street parking at all and no protest vehicles allowed in from 8 a.m. this Wednesday until at least 6 a.m. on Monday, July 4.

A map of police checkpoints in Ottawa.
Ottawa police are controlling access to these parts of downtown, including two river bridges. All vehicles that aren’t involved in rallies or protests will be allowed in, the city says, but drivers cannot park on the street. (City of Ottawa)

Those plans may change if needed, officials said Monday. People are asked to plan ahead, expect delays and check city pages and local media for updates.

OC Transpo and Société de transport de l’Outaouais service is free July 1 and when it comes to OC Transpo, until 4 a.m. July 2.

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Canada's COVID-19 response better than many comparable countries, study finds – CBC News

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Canada handled the first two years of the COVID-19 pandemic and weathered the ensuing upheaval better than several other nations with comparable health-care and economic infrastructure, a new study suggests.

The research, published in the Canadian Medical Association Journal on Monday, credits Canada’s strong performance to restrictive and persistent public health measures as well as a successful vaccination campaign.

A team of Ontario researchers compared data from February 2020 to February 2022 in 11 countries dubbed the G10 due to the late inclusion of one subject. They analyzed data from Canada, Belgium, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, the Netherlands, Sweden, Switzerland, the United Kingdom and the United States — all countries with similar political, economic, and health-care systems.

“If you look at Canada compared to the G10, the differences are enormous,” study co-author Dr. Fahad Razak said in a recent interview.

“If you look at our vaccination rate, we had the highest in the entire G10, we had the lowest number of people infected and lowest of people dying.”

The research suggests Canada’s cumulative per-capita rate of COVID-19 cases was 82,700 per million, while all countries — with the exception of Japan — were above 100,000 per million. Canada’s rate of COVID-19—related deaths was 919 per million, once again second-lowest behind Japan. All other countries were over 1,000 per million.

Raywat Deonandan, an epidemiologist and associate professor at the University of Ottawa who was not involved in the study, said the methodology of the research is sound, even if it can be challenging to compare infections and deaths across jurisdictions. 

“Bottom line: Canada’s relatively strict approach resulted in fewer infections and deaths,” Deonandan said in an email.

WATCH | Expert explains how Canada fared comparably well in the pandemic:

Canadian public health measures made ‘big difference’ against COVID-19, expert says

14 hours ago

Duration 5:01

A new study in the Canadian Medical Association Journal suggests Canada’s public health response to the COVID-19 pandemic was better than many similar countries. Montreal cardiologist Dr. Christopher Labos agrees, saying Canada did well when considering factors like mortality and vaccination rates.

‘Persistent level’ of restrictions

Razak said at least 70,000 more Canadians would have died during the first two years of the pandemic if Canada had the same death rates as the United States, the country with the highest cumulative number of COVID-19-related deaths.

“That means most of us would probably personally know a grandparent, or a friend or family member … who’s living today in Canada who would have died if we had the same trajectory as the United States,” Razak said.

He said Canada’s comparatively positive outcomes came about despite gaining access to vaccination later than most countries, noting there were also other health-care system structural disadvantages to overcome across the country at the outset of the pandemic.

A member of the Governor General’s Foot Guards wearing a mask waits on the red carpet at the Governor General’s Performing Arts Awards Gala in Ottawa on May 28. (Patrick Doyle/The Canadian Press)

“Some hospitals were so overwhelmed that we had to ambulance or airlift patients to other hospitals,” he said.

But Canada, he said, differed from other developed countries when it opted to implement public health measures that were both strict and persistent. Though such measures drew vehement opposition in some circles, Razak said they helped mitigate the pandemic’s overall impact.

“Compared to many other countries … they would have periods with tight restrictions but quickly pull back,” he said. “For Canada, it was really this high and persistent level almost entirely for the first two years.”

Highest proportion with two doses

Razak said the success of Canada’s immunization drive emerged as the strongest takeaway from the research, praising officials for engaging with the population and ensuring vaccines were readily available across the country.

More than 80 per cent of eligible Canadians have been fully vaccinated with two doses as of June. The percentage of the vaccinated populations in other G10 countries is between 64 and 77 per cent, according to the study.

“There was a magic in Canada around these vaccine roll-outs during dose one and dose two,” Razak said.

“When we speak to our colleagues across the world, Canada was the envy of the world in terms of our population rallying around this. It is a lesson to the world, that very high engagement can occur with the right strategy.”

Dr. Eleanor Fish, an immunology professor at the University of Toronto who was not involved in the study, said the findings were consistent with her own assessment of the pandemic in Canada. 

Like Razak, she said the population’s high vaccination rate played a major role in the country’s strong performance.

WATCH | Dr. Theresa Tam on timing of boosters:

COVID-19 boosters ‘likely’ needed around end of this year, Dr. Tam says

1 day ago

Duration 8:42

Canada’s chief public health officer, Dr. Theresa Tam, speaks to CBC chief political correspondent Rosemary Barton about where Canada is with COVID-19, her thoughts on vaccine boosters and what she’s watching for when cooler fall temperatures return

Fish also cautioned that there could be challenges ahead this fall, when COVID and other respiratory illnesses are likely to put a strain on the health-care system.

“We should be planning for that now,” said Fish.

Economic burden

The study also showed the countries’ response to the pandemic left an economic burden, with government debt rising for all countries and Canada registering one of the highest relative increases.

“We had these very significant economic impacts, we had very tight restrictions on our individual freedom which led to things like isolation … but we also had really among the best results in terms of controlling the impact of the virus,” Razak said.

“Was it worth it? That’s not a scientific question. That’s a values and morals and policies question.”

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