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Coronavirus: What's happening in Canada and around the world on Wednesday – CBC.ca

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The latest:

Japan expanded its coronavirus state of emergency on Wednesday for the second week in a row, adding eight more prefectures as a surge in infections fuelled by the delta variant strains the country’s health-care system.

The government last week extended the state of emergency until Sept. 12 and expanded the areas covered to 13 prefectures, up from six, including Tokyo. With four new prefectures added to a separate “quasi-emergency” status, 33 of Japan’s 47 prefectures are now under some type of emergency measures. Eight prefectures were upgraded from quasi-emergency status to a full emergency.

“In order to protect the people’s lives, the priority is to maintain the health-care system,” Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga said as he announced the emergency. “In order to overcome this crisis led by the delta strain, I seek further co-operation from everyone.”

Japan’s state of emergency relies on requirements for eateries to close at 8 p.m. and not serve alcohol, but the measures are increasingly defied. Unenforceable physical distancing and teleworking requests for the public and their employers are also largely ignored due to growing complacency.

The Japanese capital has been under the state of emergency since July 12, but new daily cases have increased more than tenfold since then to about 5,000 in Tokyo and 25,000 nationwide. Hospital beds are quickly filling up, and many people must now recover at home, including some who require supplemental oxygen.

‘No signs’ of cases slowing in Tokyo

More than 35,000 patients in Tokyo are recovering at home, about one-third of them unable to find a hospital or hotel vacancy immediately. Only a small percentage of hospitals are taking virus patients, either for financial reasons or because they lack the capability to treat the infections, experts say.

Japan has weathered the pandemic better than many other countries, with about 15,600 deaths since the start, but its vaccination efforts lag behind other wealthy nations. About 40 per cent of the population has been fully vaccinated, mainly elderly people.

Rising infections among schoolchildren and teenagers could accelerate the surge as they begin returning to class after the summer vacation, said Dr. Shigeru Omi, the top government medical adviser. He proposed schools curtail activity and urged high schools and colleges to return to online classes.

“Infections in Tokyo are showing no signs of slowing, and the severely tight medical systems will continue for a while,” he told a parliamentary session on Wednesday.

From The Associated Press, last updated at 7:05 a.m. ET


What’s happening in Canada

WATCH | Several provinces bring back mask mandates: 

Several provinces bring back mask mandates

19 hours ago

Health officials across the country are trying to keep COVID-19 cases under control and several provinces, including B.C., Manitoba and Quebec, are bringing back mask mandates for indoor public spaces and classrooms. 2:17


What’s happening around the world

Workers at the U.S. auto parts maker Lear Corporation fill out an application before receiving a dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine during a mass vaccination program for its employees in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, on Tuesday. (Jose Luis Gonzalez/Reuters)

As of Wednesday afternoon, more than 213.6 million cases of COVID-19 had been reported worldwide, according to Johns Hopkins University. The reported global death toll stood at more than 4.4 million.

In the Americas, Pfizer is seeking U.S. approval of a booster dose of its two-shot COVID-19 vaccine. The drugmaker said Wednesday that it has started the application process for a third dose of its vaccine for everyone 16 and older.

Jamaican officials are calling on doctors and nurses — including those who have retired — to help as the country deals with increasing strain from COVID-19 patients. 

“With the surge in COVID-19 cases and hospitalization, the health system in Jamaica needs your support as we work our way through this pandemic,” Prime Minister Andrew Holness said on Twitter.

In Europe, the international scientists dispatched to China by the World Health Organization to find out where the coronavirus came from say the search has stalled and warned that the window of opportunity for solving it is “closing fast.”

In a commentary published in the journal Nature, the WHO-recruited experts say the origins investigation is at “a critical juncture” requiring urgent collaboration but has instead come to a standstill. They noted among other things that Chinese officials are still reluctant to share some raw data, citing concerns about patient confidentiality.

In their analysis, published in March, the WHO team concluded that the virus likely jumped to humans from animals, and they described the possibility of a laboratory leak as “extremely unlikely.”

But the WHO experts say their report was intended only as a first step, noting that further delays “will render some of the studies biologically impossible.”

In the Middle East, COVID-19 vaccinations in Afghanistan have dropped by 80 per cent in the first week following the Taliban conquest of Kabul, the UN agency UNICEF said, warning that half of the few doses delivered to the country so far are close to expiry.

In the Asia-Pacific region, Vietnam is offering patients who have recovered from the coronavirus a monthly allowance if they agree to stay on at stretched hospitals to help health workers struggling to cope with an influx of infected people.

South Korea has reported 2,155 new coronavirus cases, nearly matching a record daily increase set earlier this month amid an alarming spread of infections. With Wednesday’s report, the country has tallied more than 1,000 new cases for 50 consecutive days, including a record 2,221 on Aug. 11.

A health-care worker moves oxygen tanks as patients infected with COVID-19 are treated at a chapel converted into an intensive care unit on Wednesday in Quezon city, Metro Manila, Philippines. (Ezra Acayan/Getty Images)

Pakistan on Wednesday reported 141 deaths from COVID-19, one of its highest tallies since May. According to Pakistan’s National Command Operation Center, more than 4,000 new coronavirus infections were also reported in the past 24 hours.

In Africa, Nigeria has recently approved China’s Sinopharm vaccine against COVID-19.

-From The Associated Press, Reuters and CBC News, last updated at 4:05 p.m. ET

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Between violence and vandalism, the parties are experiencing a very ugly campaign – CBC.ca

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The three main parties say they’ve experienced ugly incidents on the campaign trail, ranging from vandalism to assault. Some party operatives say it’s the nastiest campaign they’ve ever experienced.

One high-profile incident happened earlier this month when someone threw gravel at Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau, resulting in charges against a former People’s Party of Canada riding president.

Protests are a common sight during any election but many party workers say the ones they’re seeing during this campaign have been more alarming. The Liberal Party had to cancel a late August stop due to security concerns.

WATCH | Trudeau, security detail hit by gravel stones

Trudeau, security detail hit by gravel stones

11 days ago

A protester threw what appeared to be a handful of gravel stones at Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau outside a campaign stop in London, Ont., on Monday, striking him and members of his security detail. 0:08

Calgary Nose Hill Conservative candidate Michelle Rempel Garner released a statement earlier in the campaign saying she has been a victim of harassing behaviour on the campaign trail. She said she’s been accosted by men with cameras “demanding I respond to conspiracy theories.”

“In the last two weeks, I have also received a death threat from someone who called my office in escalating states of verbal abuse over the course of days,” she said in an Aug. 28 statement.

“It’s unfortunately an all too frequent occurrence for me and many of my colleagues, particularly women, of all political stripes. And this increase in violent language, threats and abuse certainly isn’t confined to politics.”

Canadian Anti-Hate Network executive director Evan Balgord said that this has been the worst campaign he’s seen in recent history in terms of far-right activity, which he sees as largely motivated by the pandemic.

“They believe that there is this awful situation going on, like the apocalypse, right? They think that they’re using mask mandates and stuff to kill or kidnap children or render them infertile,” he said.

“The scapegoats they’ve picked are the people they think are the puppet masters — Trudeau, provincial health authorities. And amongst the most hardcore adherents it would be the Jews, the shadow globalists, the elite and so on and so forth.”

While the Liberal Party appears to be the prime target, Balgord said members of the far-right see the Conservatives as complicit.

Vandalism, alleged assaults

Liberal candidate Carla Qualtrough, seeking re-election in the British Columbia riding of Delta, said she’s seen more expressions of hate and rage during this campaign than in previous years, including anti-LGBT and antisemitic graffiti.

“The police are involved. They’re investigating some of the issues that we’re facing. So yeah, it’s a definite tone and it’s hateful and it’s unacceptable,” she told reporters earlier this week.

A lone protester heckles Liberal leader Justin Trudeau as he takes part in an interview with Global reporter Neetu Garcha in Burnaby, B.C., on Monday, Sept. 13, 2021. The interview was set to take part outside but had to be moved inside due to the protester. (Sean Kilpatrick/The Canadian Press)

“It’s not just anger or difference of opinion. It’s really spiralled to hateful and unacceptable behaviour.”

She’s not the only candidate to involve the police. Kitchener South-Hespeler Conservative candidate Tyler Calver said Waterloo Regional Police are investigating after one of his volunteers was assaulted at a campaign office earlier this month.

Greater Sudbury police charged a 56-year-old woman for allegedly assaulting incumbent Liberal Marc Serré in his campaign office in the federal riding of Nickel Belt in northern Ontario. Police said she pushed a table against him, pinning him against the wall.

Conservative candidate Michelle Rempel Garner says she’s received a death threat. (Sean Kilpatrick/Canadian Press)

On the East Coast, Liberal candidate Dominic LeBlanc said he reported vandalism to the RCMP after someone spray-painted a campaign sign with the words “COVID Nazi.”

“There have been some other disgusting, personal things,” he said. “Somebody spray-painted one talking about my mother, who passed away a year and half ago.”

Liberal candidate Anita Anand, seeking re-election in Oakville, said her campaign has seen about 35 per cent of its signs destroyed.

Ottawa South NDP candidate Huda Mukbil said her signs are constantly being torn down.

She blames the vandalism on people opposed to the changing racial and gender makeup of Canadian politics.

“It’s particularly difficult for women generally. And then for racialized women like myself, that much more,” she told CBC Ottawa.

“So what we have to do is just come together and say that this is unacceptable in Canada.”

Balgord said the violence this year follows the trajectory of what’s been percolating online.

Ottawa South NDP candidate Huda Mukbil said police have been alerted to vandalism done to her election signs and are investigating. (Twitter )

“We’ve allowed online hate to just fester in all the online platforms that Canadians use every day,” he said.

“When online hate festers like that, people start to think it’s normal and acceptable to not just say those things online, but to do those things kind of in person.”

People’s Party of Canada Leader Maxime Bernier was egged at a campaign event earlier this month in Saskatoon.

In an August 26 news release, Green Party Leader Annamie Paul raised concerns about mounting threats to her campaign. The party says that while the Green campaign has not seen any hecklers at press conferences, it’s aware of online posts threatening to disrupt events.

‘We will not allow them to define us’: Trudeau

As the campaign enters its final days, nerves appear frayed.

Trudeau is standing by his response to a heckler who used a sexist slur against his wife.

“Isn’t there a hospital you should be going to bother right now?” Trudeau said.

On Thursday, the Liberal leader said he won’t step back in the face of protests or harassment.

WATCH | Trudeau to heckler: ‘Isn’t there a hospital you should be going to bother?’

Trudeau to heckler: ‘Isn’t there a hospital you should be going to bother?’

4 days ago

Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau can be heard responding to a man who shouted obscenities at him as the Liberal leader arrived for a media interview in Vancouver on Monday. 0:34

“We will not allow an angry minority that does not believe in science — and we have a lot of examples of their intolerance of women, the fact that they are racist — we will not allow them to define us and decide the direction we will take to put an end to this pandemic,” he said in French.

But NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh said such snide remarks only bait protesters, who that day had picketed hospitals across the country.

“He shouldn’t have been joking about that because it’s it is dangerous and it’s really causing problems for lots of people,” he said this week.

When asked to comment on campaign violence, the NDP accused Trudeau of sowing divisions with rhetoric that has led to heightened frustrations and backlash.

“Justin Trudeau called a selfish election and throughout his campaign, rather than provide solutions for the challenges families face, he’s talked about divisions,” said a party spokesperson.

“Families are paying the price for his rhetoric — protesters blocking hospitals and assaulting health care workers, a rise in COVID-19 cases across the province and even violence on the campaign trail.”

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COMMENTARY: Young Canadians are struggling economically. This election is our chance to fix that. – Global News

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Much like nearly half of the country, I was hoping Prime Minister Justin Trudeau wouldn’t call an early election in the midst of a pandemic, but here we are.

Canada’s federal election will take place on Sept. 20, so the Liberals, Conservatives, New Democrats and Greens have just a few days left to convince young Canadians to vote in their favour. Top of mind for gen Zs and millennials? Employment.

Read more:
First-time voter says her choice for election 2021 reflects her ‘lived experiences’

Unemployment rates for young Canadians increased by six per cent from 2019 to 2020 — roughly twice that of older Canadians, a Statistics Canada study about youth employment published last month revealed. Indeed, by 2020, the unemployment rate for Canadians aged 15 to 30 who weren’t in school full-time hovered just under 15 per cent. This has been a trend since COVID-19’s arrival in March 2020 when the number of post-secondary working students dropped by 28 per cent from the previous month.

As StatsCan says, this relatively high unemployment rate suggests young Canadians joining the labour force “might see lower earnings in the years following graduation than they would have in a more dynamic labour market.”


Click to play video: 'Canada’s third COVID-19 wave creates ‘zigzag’ economy'



2:04
Canada’s third COVID-19 wave creates ‘zigzag’ economy


Canada’s third COVID-19 wave creates ‘zigzag’ economy – May 7, 2021

There’s a clear need for a post-pandemic recovery plan that supports gen Zs and millennials in getting jobs. Some even had to sacrifice internships and other entry-level opportunities that would’ve given them a foot in the door because COVID-19’s arrival not only meant that working out of the office wasn’t an option, but also that many companies weren’t yet prepared for the transition to remote working.

Case in point: One of my fellows who graduated from journalism school in the spring of 2020 lost out on a school-funded reporting trip to Rwanda and an internship — which could have led to a permanent job — because the newsroom decided not to bring on interns after the pandemic’s arrival. To make matters worse, due to his unique circumstances as someone who graduated right before COVID-19 hit, he neither qualified for Canada’s Employment Insurance (EI) program nor the Canada Emergency Response Benefit (CERB) because he hadn’t started working yet.

He told me the CESB wasn’t enough to support him, so he’s been living with his parents during the pandemic. The Canada Emergency Student Benefit (CESB) provided a scant $1,250 per month for eligible students from May through August 2020, and $1,750 per month for students with dependents and those with permanent disabilities. In most major Canadian cities, that amount would barely cover the cost of one month’s rent for a studio apartment.

Commentary:
Remote work isn’t a trend. It’s a fundamental shift in Canada’s work culture

Young Canadians with disabilities, who are less likely to be employed than their non-disabled counterparts, have even bigger economic barriers to overcome. Indeed, the election announcement effectively killed Bill C-35, the proposed Canada Disability Benefit Act, which aims to reduce poverty and support the financial security of working-age Canadians with disabilities.

As part of Canada’s post-pandemic economic recovery plan, our parties would do well to create green jobs. Not only will they contribute to the fight against climate change, which is a priority issue for gen Zs and millennials, these jobs will also help young Canadians get back to work. They include opportunities in the sectors of renewable energy, environmental protection, sustainable urban planning and more, as well as low-carbon jobs like teaching and care-worker roles.


Click to play video: 'Canada’s job seekers may have upper hand amid labour squeeze'



2:02
Canada’s job seekers may have upper hand amid labour squeeze


Canada’s job seekers may have upper hand amid labour squeeze

Despite some resistance to a snap election as the delta variant of COVID-19 picks up, our country’s politicians have an opportunity to improve the financial future of young Canadians across the country during a time when they’re struggling economically.

Now’s the time to shore up our youngest generations and future leaders.

Anita Li is a media strategist and consultant with a decade of experience as a multi-platform journalist at outlets across North America. She is also a journalism instructor at Ryerson University, the City University of New York’s Craig Newmark Graduate School of Journalism and Centennial College. She is the co-founder of Canadian Journalists of Colour, a rapidly growing network of BIPOC media-makers in Canada, as well as a member of the 2020-21 Online News Association board of directors. To keep up with Anita Li, subscribe to The Other Wave, her newsletter about challenging the status quo in journalism.

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Coronavirus: What's happening in Canada and around the world on Thursday – CBC.ca

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The latest:

In Europe, about 3,000 French health-care workers were suspended for not meeting this week’s deadline to get mandatory coronavirus vaccinations, the health minister said Thursday.

Most of the people suspended work in support positions and were not medical staff, Health Minister Olivier Veran told RTL radio. The number suspended was lower than projected ahead of the Wednesday deadline.

A few dozen of France’s 2.7 million health-care workers have quit their jobs because of the vaccine mandate, he said.

France ordered all health-care workers to get vaccinated or be suspended without pay. Most French people support the measure. However, it prompted weeks of protests by a vocal minority against the vaccine mandate.


What’s happening across Canada

B.C. Premier John Horgan shows his provincial COVID-19 vaccine card in Vancouver on Thursday. (Darryl Dyck/The Canadian Press)

  • Southern health region sees biggest chunk of Manitoba’s 64 new cases.
  • P.E.I. announces 9 new cases related to Charlottetown school outbreak.
  • N.S. reports 34 new cases amid outbreak in unvaccinated northern community.

What’s happening around the world

As of Thursday, more than 226.4 million cases of COVID-19 had been reported worldwide, according to Johns Hopkins University’s coronavirus tracker. The reported global death toll stood at more than 4.6 million.

In the Americas, Cuba began a vaccination campaign for children between the ages of two and 10, saying it was necessary to curb the spread of the delta variant. Meanwhile, the nearby U.S. state of Florida has surpassed 50,000 COVID-19 deaths, officials said, despite recent steep drops in hospitalizations and infections.

PHOTOS | Children in Cuba get vaccinated:

In Asia, Chinese health officials say more than a billion people have been fully vaccinated in the world’s most populous country — that represents 72 per cent of its 1.4 billion people.  China has largely stopped the spread by imposing restrictions and mass testing whenever new cases are found. It also limits entry to the country and requires people who arrive to quarantine in a hotel for at least two weeks.

In Africa, the World Health Organization’s Africa director says COVID-19 cases across the continent dropped 30 per cent last week, but says it’s hardly reassuring given the dire shortage of vaccines.  WHO’s Dr. Matshidiso Moeti says only 3.6 per cent of Africa’s population have been fully immunized, noting export bans and the hoarding of vaccines by rich countries has resulted in “a chokehold” on vaccine supplies to Africa.

Elsewhere in Europe, in order for Italian workers in both the public and private sectors to access the workplace, they must provide a health pass — which shows proof of vaccination, a negative result on a recent rapid test or recovery from COVID-19 in the last six months — starting on Oct. 15. Slovenia and Greece adopted similar measures this week.

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