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Court documents leak Joe Rogan’s private texts to Elon Musk — ‘Are you going to liberate Twitter?’

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Eccentric billionaire Elon Musk, the brains behind Tesla and SpaceX, among other things, recently tried to buy the social media platform Twitter but then backed out of the deal after a disagreement over social media bots. Now Twitter is suing Musk for performance.

What does that have to do with UFC color commentator Joe Rogan?

Rogan struck up a friendship with Musk following the latter’s controversial (and somewhat smoky) appearance on “The Joe Rogan Experience” back in late 2018. Not surprisingly, Rogan was one of many high-profile names listed in the text logs leaked by Kate Conger.

Rogan: Are you going to liberate Twitter from the censorship happy mob?

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Musk: “I will provide advice, which they may or may not choose to follow.”

Rogan: “I REALLY hope you get Twitter. If you do, we should throw a hell of a party.”

Musk:

Why throw a party when you can have a Pajama Jammy Jam?

Rogan has been anti-censorship for the entirety of his career, doubling down on his speak-your-mind philosophy despite multiple cancelation attempts after the 55 year-old podcasting giant hooked up with Spotify for a “gross” amount of money back in May 2020.

The Twitter-Musk trial is expected to start later this month.

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Family says Amazon shipped fake product, refuses refund until 'correct' item returned – CBC News

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When Matthew Legault graduated from high school in June, his parents figured they’d recognize his hard work by buying the parts he needed to build his own personal computer.

They placed an order with Amazon and it arrived at their Calgary home quickly.

But when Matthew opened the graphics card — a $690 part — he discovered the plastic casing had been hollowed out and filled with a putty-like substance to give it weight.

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“It was actually a bit of a shock,” he said. “Everything looked pretty official up to the point where I pulled it out and took a second look.”

The real shock came, though, when Matthew’s father tried to get a refund. 

François Legault followed Amazon’s return instructions and sent the item back, expecting a refund. 

Instead, Amazon said in an email there would be no refund until the “correct” item was shipped back.

On top of that, the Amazon rep said the returned, fake item had been thrown out, to protect other employees.

“It was absurd,” said François. “It’s just a piece of plastic so I doubt there’s any danger to their employees. And secondly … now they’ve destroyed the piece of evidence.”

Amazon repeatedly claimed it had shipped the correct item. 

Legault repeatedly explained he had received and returned “a complete fake” and attached photos to prove it. 

Telling customers the item they’ve returned has been disposed of is a great way for Amazon to “end the conversation,” said marketing specialist Marc Gordon, who coaches both small companies and big-name multinationals on interacting with customers. 

The fake graphic card, filled with a putty-like substance to provide weight, that Matthew says arrived from Amazon. (Submitted by François Legault)

But “that’s impacting the quality of service they provide.”

Service, Gordon says, may be affected as customers who flocked to the online retailer during the pandemic return to brick-and-mortar stores, forcing Amazon to re-organize.

“They don’t have the time or the resources to deal with every customer complaint, every inquiry, every problem,” said Gordon. “They want this done and they want to move on to something else.”

In an email, Amazon’s Canada spokesperson Ryma Boussoufa said: “Not every returned product can or may legally be resold or donated for hygienic or product safety reasons. In those cases, we will recycle products where possible.”

‘Slap in the face’

François says his history with Amazon should have stood for something — he’s been a loyal customer for years, and rarely returned anything.

“The box had obviously been tampered with,” he said. “We kind of expected that Amazon would have better quality controls, better procedures to ensure that something like this doesn’t happen.” 

Amazon’s global profit growth slowed between 2020 and 2021. Industry experts estimate this trend will continue. (Chris Young/The Canadian Press)

“They’re basically saying that we’re trying to defraud them,” said François. “We’ve never had a pattern of returning things, or anything of that nature.”

An Amazon rep had, at one point, said the decision was final.

“That’s a little bit of a slap in the face,” said François. “They’re basically shutting this down and saying that there’s nothing else to discuss. And unfortunately, I beg to differ.”

After Go Public made inquiries, the company refunded François and apologized for taking almost five months to resolve the “unfortunate incident.” 

Amazon reported global profits in 2020 of over $386 billion US, a 38 per cent increase over the previous year. It doubled its workforce between 2020 and 2021 and rapidly expanded. 

But last year, growth was slower — a 22 per cent increase over 2020 — and growth for the current year is expected to be slower again, according to industry experts.

Matthew games on the personal computer he built with parts ordered from Amazon. The Legaults eventually bought its graphics card from a local store. (Colin Hall/CBC)

Last month, Amazon confirmed it would be laying off some 10,000 employees worldwide.

The returns customers make every day are a major expense for Amazon, Gordon says. 

Online retailers in general lose an average of 21 per cent of a returned item’s original value — once costs for shipping, processing and restocking are factored in — according to a U.S.-based study by Pitney Bowes earlier this year. 

Go Public asked what percentage of orders were returned last year, but Boussoufa wrote that the company doesn’t release that data “for reasons of commercial sensitivity.”

More returned products ‘disposed’

Go Public heard from more than half a dozen others who said they, too, were frustrated by Amazon’s policy of disposing returned items before a dispute was resolved. 

Allan Papernick of St. Davids, Ont., ordered a $280 Citizen watch last April. But it was difficult to read the black hands on its black face, so he sent it back. 

Amazon repeatedly told Papernick he had sent back an “older model” watch, which it had then discarded. It asked him to return the correct item. 

“If I was scamming them, then let them send that item back to me,” he said. “Getting rid of it is a weird business practice, to say the least.”

He threatened to sue for $10,000 and received a full refund the next day. 

Amazon did not answer when Go Public asked whether all outgoing packages are individually inspected to confirm the contents. But every returned item is carefully inspected “to accurately determine its condition,” according to Boussoufa, the spokesperson. 

Other customers, like Justin Tabbert of Ottawa, say they will never again order from Amazon after similar, frustrating experiences.

WATCH | What to do when your Amazon package arrives:

Advice from a customer experience expert

5 days ago

Duration 0:28

Marc Gordon shares a tip to give consumers the upper hand when opening an Amazon package. 

He spent about $700 ordering RAM for his computer last April, but says his package had been opened and was missing half the order.

When he sent it back, Amazon complained it was “missing components.” It ended up resending the full order, but the issue’s still not resolved.

“Now they are saying they will charge me for another [order], because in their view, they’ve sent two,” said Tabbert.

Make an unboxing video

Gordon says Amazon’s tactic of insisting a customer return an item they say they don’t have is designed to put the onus back on the customer to fix the issue.

“The problem is, it doesn’t work,” said Gordon. “You just end up with a really irate customer who feels that they’ve been taken advantage of, or misled or screwed over.”

He says anyone worried about not being able to get a refund if an online order has problems, should make an unboxing video. Have someone grab their phone and film when a package is opened.

“If it’s exactly what they ordered, great, they can delete the video,” said Gordon. “If it is, in fact, something that’s been substituted or fake or fraudulent, well, it’s right there in the video. There’s no denying it.”

As for Matthew Legault, the high school grad is happy his computer is up and running — he uses it to play games with friends and is learning how to write computer code. 

His father says the Amazon dispute has taught him something, too.

“This whole experience has really motivated me to shop local again,” said  François. 

Amazon has “lost a lot of business from us.”

Submit your story ideas

Go Public is an investigative news segment on CBC-TV, radio and the web.

We tell your stories, shed light on wrongdoing and hold the powers that be accountable.

If you have a story in the public interest, or if you’re an insider with information, contact GoPublic@cbc.ca with your name, contact information and a brief summary. All emails are confidential until you decide to Go Public.

Follow @CBCGoPublic on Twitter.

Read more stories by Go Public.

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GM converts CAMI plant in Ingersoll, Ont., to make electric delivery vans – CBC News

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A General Motors plant in Ingersoll, Ont., has been converted into an assembly line for electric delivery vans, making it the first full-scale electric vehicle-making facility in Canada.

The first BrightDrop Zevo 600 rolled off the line at the CAMI plant on Monday, marking the reopening of the facility that was temporarily shuttered in May in order to retool itself from making internal combustion engines into one that builds electric vehicles.

“We are fully committed to an all-electric future,” GM Canada president Marissa West told CBC News in an interview. “We’re seeing a really high customer demand.”

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Representatives of the provincial and federal governments, which each kicked in $259 million to help the automaker upgrade the facility, were on hand for a media event commemorating the opening. The total price tag for the GM’s upgrades to its facilities in Ontario in Ingersoll and Oshawa was $2 billion, GM has said previously.

BrightDrop is a unit of GM that focuses on building delivery vehicles for commercial customers, not passengers. Prior to the CAMI upgrading, GM made the BrightDrop vans on a very limited basis at another facility in Michigan.

Similarly, other electric vehicles have been made on a limited basis in Canada, but nothing on the scale of what GM has planned with the BrightDrop launch.

Banking on electric future

After decades as a key hub in the North American auto industry, Canada’s status as a car-making powerhouse has slipped in recent years, as the major car companies have slowly cut back production at facilities scattered across southern Ontario.

The last round of union negotiations in late 2020, however, made it clear that both sides see the industry’s future is electric, and Monday’s unveiling is likely the first in what’s set to be a long line of Canadian-made EVs.

“We really believe that we’re at an inflection point where EVs are becoming much more mainstream,” West said.

Growing market

Though niche right now, electric vehicles are taking up more and more space on Canadian roads. Up to five per cent of all vehicles in Canada are either fully electric or hybrid, and that ratio is expected to increase in the coming years. 

By 2035, the government insists that all new vehicles in Canada will be electric, an ambitious target for a little over 12 years from now, but Monday’s announcement brings that one step closer.

WATCH | GM Canada on why the future is electric:

GM Canada’s President on the future of auto manufacturing in Canada

9 hours ago

Duration 7:13

Canada’s first electric vehicle assembly line is up and running in Ingersoll, Ontario. The CBC’s Nisha Patel sat down with GM Canada’s President, Marissa West, to find out what this transformation means for Canada’s auto industry.

According to West, GM has a similar timeline for its operations around the world, with the company forecasting its entire global fleet to be free of tailpipe emissions by 2035.

Jacquie Richards, the quality launch manager at the facility, says the future is now, when it comes to electric vehicles.

The vehicle itself, the BrightDrop Zevo 600, will be used primarily by commercial customers including FedEx, Walmart, DHL, Verizon and others.

“I’m excited to see this vehicle we’re making delivering packages in our neighbourhood,” Richards said.

Production will start slow, with just a few thousand vehicles annually, but that’s expected to ramp up to 50,000 at year by 2025.

After a rough few years for the industry, Mike Van Boekel, chair of Unifor Local 88, which represents the plant’s hourly workers, said it’s nice to be positive about the future again.

He said roughly 700 people who were employed at the CAMI facility have voluntarily retired in the past two years, but the new work means anyone who had a job there before who wants one now can have one.

The plant was idled in May for the refurbishment, but as of Monday, there were about 400 workers on the line — with maybe more to come.

“We’ll actually have to hire for the third shift, which is good news for people looking for work as well,” he told CBC News. If that happens, there could be as many as 1,600 people working at the CAMI plant by the end of next year.

With the GM news and other initiatives about critical mineral mines and battery facilities, Canada’s automotive sector is pinning its hopes on the future on electrification, and automotive consultant Sam Fiorani says that’s a smart move.

About 400 people are working the line making electric vans at the CAMI plant in Ingersoll today, but that is expected to ramp up in the coming months and years. (Evan Mitsui/CBC)

Countries like Norway and others are well ahead of North America in terms of electric vehicle adoption, but consumer appetite is growing, the founder of Auto Forecast Solutions said.

“The U.S. Canada, and much of the rest of the world are going to be behind them. But we’ll get there over the next 20 years.”

A big problem facing the industry for now isn’t demand, but supply. “Supply of vehicles has been so tight that dealers can offer whatever they want,” he said. “I’ve walked into dealerships where they tack $5,000 onto the list price of a car; it’s just outrageous at the moment.”

But as inventories slowly build up, there will be more and more vehicles for consumers in the key price range of $20,000 to $40,000, which is when things will really take off. And Fiorani says Canada is poised to make more than its fair share of them.

“With the market in the U.S. moving very rapidly toward EVs, the Canadian industry will be really well-situated for providing a lot of vehicles for the U.S.,” he said. “They’re well-positioned to get more than their share. I think Mexico might be behind at the moment.”


Do you have a question about climate change and what is being done about it? Send an email to ask@cbc.ca

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Stock market news live updates: Stocks smoked as oil, tech stocks lead markets lower

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U.S. stocks sunk Monday as investors digested the first releases in a week full of economic data and mulled what recent data could mean for Federal Reserve policy ahead.

The S&P 500 (^GSPC) fell by 1.8%, while the Dow Jones Industrial Average (^DJI) was down by 1.4%, or more than 480 points. The technology-heavy Nasdaq Composite (^IXIC) fell by 1.9%.

The economic data front provided further bearish signals for stocks, as key indicators came in stronger than expected. Leading the economic calendar for the week was the release of the Institute for Supply Management’s (ISM) services index. The index expanded faster in November than anticipated, at a 56.5 level compared to estimates of 53.5 and above October’s reading of 54.4, painting the picture of a still-strong services industry.

Meanwhile, new orders for U.S.-manufactured goods also beat expectations, rising 1.0% in October.

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In a separate report, however, S&P Global’s the Purchasing Managers’ Index (PMI) stood at a 46.2 level in November, down from the October reading of 47.8. New business activity fell at the sharpest rate since May 2020, S&P Global said.

The new data comes on the heels of Friday’s hotter-than-expected jobs report, which sent stocks to a choppy session. The strong job gains and robust wage growth are the opposite of what the Federal Reserve would like to see in its battle against inflation. Friday’s figures showed demand for workers remains out of balance with supply, signaling that Fed policymakers could either take rates higher than previously anticipated or hold them higher for longer in restrictive territory.

New readings on the producer price index (PPI) — which measures prices paid for goods and services before they reach consumers and consumer sentiment — will be out this week.

The narrative from U.S. central bank officials, now in their pre-meeting blackout period, has suggested they would downshift to a half-point hike at their Dec. 13-14 meeting, after four consecutive 75 basis-point increases. Investors are now wondering how much longer will the central bank continue to hold its tightening campaign, how high the federal funds rate will end up, and how long it will stay there.

“It’s fascinating that at the moment the market is focusing squarely on the very strong likelihood that we’ll ratchet down to ‘only’ a 50bps hike next week and extrapolating that level of dovishness rather than focus on any risks that the terminal rate could end up being nearer say 6% than 5%,” Jim Reid and colleagues at Deutsche Bank wrote in an early morning note Monday.

Meanwhile, another batch of third-quarter earnings figures will be out, finishing off the reporting season.

The yield on the benchmark 10-year Treasury note Monday moved back up past 3.5%, while oil prices fell as new sanctions on Russian energy took effect, with WTI crude settling at $77.33 per barrel. On Sunday, OPEC+, or the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries and its allies, including Russia, stayed the course on planned production cuts.

In corporate news, Tesla (TSLA) shares sank more than 6% after Bloomberg reported that the company plans to cut production at its Shanghai factory, the latest sign of weak demand in China.

Slack co-founder and CEO Stewart Butterfield is stepping down from Salesforce in January, just a week after co-CEO Bret Taylor announced his resignation. He’ll be succeed by longtime Salesforce cloud executive Lidiane Jones. The news comes less than two years after Salesforce bought Slack for $28 billion. Shares of Salesforce (CRM) closed down more than 7%.

Overseas, Asian equities jumped on Monday after local Chinese authorities downgraded some of their strict COVID policies after public protests last week led to a major shift in Beijing’s commitment to its zero-COVID policy.

Elsewhere, in crypto world, Sam Bankman-Fried said he will testify before the House Financial Services Committee after he finishes “learning and reviewing what happened” in the collapse of FTX, the crypto exchange he founded.

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