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COVID-19 in B.C.: Almost 250 new cases and over 1200 active cases; almost 700 active cases in Interior Health; and more – The Georgia Straight

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Both B.C. Health Minister Adrian Dix and provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry have been speaking at news conferences about the risks and impact of both B.C. wildfires as well as extreme heat conditions upon health across the province.

While the province faces challenges from those issues, the numbers of new and active COVID-19 cases in B.C. continue to climb upward.

Once again, the new case count for the province hit a new high in recent weeks and the number of active cases has risen above 1,200 cases.

In addition, Interior Health, with an outbreak in the Central Okanagan that was declared earlier this week, is nearing 700 active cases.

Today, the B.C. Health Ministry is reporting 243 new COVID-19 cases (including one epi-linked case).

Currently, there are 1,231 active cases, which is a rise of 176 cases since yesterday.

At the moment, 47 individuals with COVID-19 are in hospital (a decrease of four people since yesterday), and 16 of those patients are in intensive care units (four fewer than yesterday).

The new and active cases include:

  • 131 new cases in Interior Health, with 693 total active cases (an increase of 93 cases since yesterday);
  • 56 new cases in Fraser Health, with 277 total active cases (an increase of 35 cases);
  • 32 new cases in Vancouver Coastal Health, with 160 total active cases (an increase of 21 cases);
  • 13 new cases in Island Health, with 65 total active cases (an increase of 14 cases);
  • nine new cases in Northern Health, with 28 total active cases (an increase of nine cases);
  • two new cases of people from outside of Canada, with eight total active cases (an increase of three cases).

The good news is that no new deaths have been reported. That leaves the overall total COVID-19-related fatalities at 1,771 people who have died during the pandemic.

With 66 recoveries since yesterday, a cumulative total of 146,876 people who tested positive have now recovered.

During the pandemic, B.C. has recorded a cumulative total of 149,889 cases.

B.C. Health Minister Adrian Dix
Province of British Columbia

Yesterday, Island Health announced that the Eagle Ridge immunization clinic would be relocated on July 30 to the air-conditioned Victoria Conference Centre due to the anticipated high temperatures.

Today, Island Health extended the relocation dates to July 31 and August 1.

Since the provincial immunization program began in December, B.C. has administered 6,774,257 doses of Pfizer, Moderna, and AstraZeneca vaccines.

As of today, 81.1 percent (3,758,385) of eligible people 12 and older have received their first dose and 64.9 percent (3,008,360) have received their second dose.

In addition, 82.0 percent (3,548,137) of all eligible adults in B.C. have received their first dose and 67.5 percent (2,921,008) have received their second dose.

More good news is that none of the five regional health authorities have declared any new healthcare or community outbreaks, and none have listed any new public exposure events or business closures.

Currently, there are two active healthcare outbreaks, both in longterm care facilities: Holyrood Manor (Fraser Health) and Nelson Jubilee Manor (Interior Health).

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Vancouver Island opens up five ICU beds for COVID-19 patients from Northern Health region – Victoria Buzz

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During a COVID-19 press conference today, BC health officials announced that in order to prevent an overrun ICU in the Northern Health region, they would be opening five ICU beds on Vancouver Island and ten beds in the Lower Mainland.

Also during the conference, on whether Northern BC COVID-19 response could end up similar to what is happening in Alberta, Dr. Bonnie Henry said that BC is not at the same point as our neighbours to the east.

Henry also noted that due to BC’s current COVID-19 response, the province would not be able to handle taking on Alberta residents into their ICU care.

“We are not at a breaking point [like Alberta]. We are in a different place. But sadly, as a country, especially in BC, we cannot take people from Alberta into our [BC’s] ICU care,” Dr. Bonnie Henry said.

This begs the question of where Vancouver Island health services are at.

Earlier this month, Victoria Buzz reported a story about a father pleading for people to get vaccinated after his son was waiting for an ICU bed at the Royal Jubilee Hospital ICU due to what he saw was overrun with COVID-19 cases.

“He [Joel] is in a coma, and they’ve tried bringing him out. He’s still in CCU, and he’s on a ventilator. He’s just waiting for a bed in the ICU,” Roberts said.

“Before he had his episode, I felt that yes, people need to get vaccinated. But this has made that sentiment stronger. Stop thinking about yourself and start thinking about everyone else.”

Victoria Buzz spoke to Island Health to get a better grasp of how Vancouver Island has been handling this fourth wave of the pandemic, and how ICUs in Victoria are holding up.

A representative for Island Health confirmed that they are seeing an increasing impact on hospitals and critical care units amidst the fourth wave.

They said that since the beginning of the pandemic, Royal Jubilee, Victoria General, and Nanaimo Regional General hospitals were the core facilities supporting COVID-19 patients.

Despite occupancy varying day-to-day, last week’s average occupancy of critical care beds was 73%, according to Island Health. In comparison, Alberta’s ICU capacity is 88%.

In order to support additional critical care needs beyond base capacity Island Health has now implemented surge critical care beds and an inpatient unit at Victoria General Hospital for non-critical care patients.

In a statement to Victoria Buzz, Island Health expressed their willingness to do what they can to support the province, but also acknowledged what British Columbians could do as well: get vaccinated.

“In addition to supporting the increasing critical care needs of Vancouver Island residents, we have supported over a dozen critical care patients from other health authorities,” the Island Health representative told Victoria Buzz.

“Our health-care teams need every eligible resident of Island Health to get vaccinated today if they haven’t already, and follow public health guidance, in order to protect our health-care system and our teams.”

As of this publication, 87% of all eligible British Columbians have been vaccinated and there are currently 540 active cases on Vancouver Island.

Of the 353 British Columbians who have been hospitalized from September 6th to September 19th due to COVID-19, 279 (79%) were unvaccinated.

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Quebec man punches nurse in face for giving wife COVID-19 vaccine – Campbell River Mirror

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Police in Quebec say they are looking for a man who is alleged to have repeatedly punched a nurse in the face because he was angry she had vaccinated his wife against COVID-19.

Police say a man between the ages of 30 and 45 approached the nurse on Monday morning at a pharmacy in Sherbrooke, Que., about 150 kilometres east of Montreal.

They say he accused the nurse of vaccinating his wife against her consent and repeatedly punched the nurse before leaving the store.

Police say the nurse had to be treated in hospital for serious injuries to her face.

Quebec’s order of nurses tweeted today that the alleged assault was unacceptable and wished the nurse a full recovery.

Sherbrooke police are asking for the public’s help in finding the assailant, who they say has short dark hair, dark eyes, thick eyebrows and a tattoo resembling a cross on his hand.

—The Canadian Press

RELATED: ‘Go the hell home’: B.C. leaders condemn anti-vaccine passport protests

RELATED: ‘Stay away from children!’: Premier denounces protesters who entered Salmon Arm schools

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Sask. children's hospital ICU accepts adults in COVID-19 surge plan – CTV News Saskatoon

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SASKATOON —
The Saskatchewan Health Authority (SHA) is shuttling some adult intensive care patients to the province’s children’s hospital in the face of surging COVID-19 cases.

“Critical care capacity is under strain and all avenues of support need to be explored to so we can continue to care for extremely ill patients,” Chief Medical Officer Dr. Susan Shaw said in a news release.

Adult patients requiring an ICU bed will be considered for admission to Jim Pattison Children’s Hospital in Saskatoon, according to the health authority.

Patients are selected through a clinical review by the adult and pediatric critical care physicians.

Pediatric patients will continue to be prioritized for critical care at the hospital’s PICU (pediatric intensive care unit) and no pediatric patients will be displaced, according to the SHA.

The change is effective immediately and is part of a larger SHA surge plan announced Sept. 17 to prepare for a growing number of COVID patients throughout the health system.

The PICU will be able to surge to 18 critical care beds, including six additional flex beds for both pediatric and selected adult patients.

Staffing plans have been developed and continue to be secured for the additional beds, much of which will come through service slowdowns.

The SHA’s normal (ICU) capacity is 79 beds. To increase ICU capacity, the SHA has also added 22 surge beds.

As of Tuesday afternoon, 78 of the 101 available ICU beds were full and two adult COVID infectious patients had been admitted to JPCH.

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