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COVID-19 in Ottawa: Fast Facts for Feb. 16, 2021 – CTV Edmonton

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OTTAWA —
Good morning. Here is the latest news on COVID-19 and its impact on Ottawa.

Fast Facts:

  • Ottawa reopens into the “Orange-Restrict” category today.
  • A new mental health alliance has been created for small business owners in Ottawa struggling during the pandemic.
  • Total COVID-19 cases in Ottawa surpassed 14,000 on Monday.
  • The federal goverment expects shipments of the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine to ramp up significantly in the next few weeks.
  • Racialized populations have been placed on the federal government’s priority list for COVID-19 vaccinations.
  • New data shows roughly how many people in the National Capital Region received CERB payments in 2020.

COVID-19 by the numbers in Ottawa (Ottawa Public Health data):

  • New COVID-19 cases: 59 new cases on Monday
  • Total COVID-19 cases: 14,007
  • COVID-19 cases per 100,000 (previous seven days): 28.5
  • Positivity rate in Ottawa: 1.6 per cent (Feb. 8 – Feb. 14)
  • Reproduction Number: 1.00 (seven day average)

Testing:

Who should get a test?

Ottawa Public Health says there are five reasons to seek testing for COVID-19:

  • You are showing COVID-19 symptoms. OR
  • You have been exposed to a confirmed case of the virus, as informed by Ottawa Public Health or exposure notification through the COVID Alert app. OR
  • You are a resident or work in a setting that has a COVID-19 outbreak, as identified and informed by Ottawa Public Health. OR
  • You are eligible for testing as part of a targeted testing initiative directed by the Ministry of Health or the Ministry of Long-Term Care. OR
  • You have traveled to the U.K., or have come into contact with someone who recently traveled to the U.K., please go get tested immediately (even if you have no symptoms).

Where to get tested for COVID-19 in Ottawa:

There are several sites for COVID-19 testing in Ottawa. To book an appointment, visit https://www.ottawapublichealth.ca/en/shared-content/assessment-centres.aspx

  • The Brewer Ottawa Hospital/CHEO Assessment Centre: Open Monday to Thursday from 8:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. and Friday to Sunday from 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
  • COVID-19 Drive-thru assessment centre at National Arts Centre: Open seven days a week from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.
  • The Moodie Care and Testing Centre: Open Monday to Friday from 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
  • The Heron Care and Testing Centre: Open Monday to Friday from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.
  • The Ray Friel Care and Testing Centre: Open Monday to Friday from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.

COVID-19 screening tool:

The COVID-19 screening tool for students heading back to in-person classes can be found here.

Symptoms:

  • Classic Symptoms: fever, new or worsening cough, shortness of breath
  • Other symptoms: sore throat, difficulty swallowing, new loss of taste or smell, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, pneumonia, new or unexplained runny nose or nasal congestion
  • Less common symptoms: unexplained fatigue, muscle aches, headache, delirium, chills, red/inflamed eyes, croup

Businesses in Ottawa are able to reopen today, with restrictions, and some gathering limits have been eased.

The provincial stay-at-home order has officially ended for Ottawa. The region is now in the “Orange-Restrict” level under Ontario’s COVID-19 framework. This allows for indoor dining to resume with capacity limits and a maximum of four people per table. Social gatherings are limited to a maximum of 10 people indoors and 25 outdoors, provided physical distancing can be maintained. Gyms, bars, and cinemas can reopen, with restrictions, as can hair salons, though personal services that require masks to be removed remain off-limits.

The Eastern Ontario Health Unit is also moving into Orange-Restrict today, while the Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit is moving to the “Green-Prevent” zone, which is the loosest of Ontario’s colour-coded zones.

Ontario COVID-19 restrictions

The fatigue, stress, anxiety and deep depression of financial strain has plagued Ottawa’s small business community through waves of lockdowns during the COVID-19 pandemic.

The issue is so severe that a new alliance is being formed to help entrepreneurs bounce back.

Businesses in Ottawa closed their doors in the spring of 2020 when the COVID-19 pandemic began, slowly reopened heading into the summer, and then faced another 28-day lockdown in October when COVID-19 case counts began to rise again. Then, just as the busy Christmas season was getting underway, a provincewide shutdown in late December closed everything again. It was then coupled with a stay-at-home order in mid-January that is only now coming to an end.

The narrative surrounding business owners and their mental health was becoming the norm.

Recognizing that, co-founder of Ottawa Special Events Michael Wood says he made the call to form an alliance.

A virtual town hall is planned for Tuesday, Feb. 23. You can register here.

Closed sign Ottawa

Ottawa passed another COVID-19 milestone on Monday, hitting just over 14,000 total laboratory-confirmed cases of COVID-19 since the pandemic began.

Ottawa Public Health said 59 more people tested positive for COVID-19 on Monday and one more person died. Active cases have been slowly rising in the past five days, but hospitalizations remain below 20 people, with three in the ICU. 

433 people in Ottawa have died of COVID-19, while 13,136 have recovered.

Canada is expecting close to one million doses of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine in the coming weeks following a slow start up to the national effort to inoculate Canadians against COVID-19.

The Public Health Agency of Canada says it expects the two pharmaceutical companies to deliver more than 400,000 doses this week and another 475,000 following a slowdown as Pfizer expanded a production plant in Belgium. 

This comes as Ontario announced Sunday it would be moving certain populations, including adults over 80, into phase one of its vaccination plan. The federal government’s national advisory committee on immunization is recommending adults from racialized communities disproportionately affected by the COVID-19 pandemic be prioritized for shots in the second stage of the vaccination campaign.

To date, the City of Ottawa has received just over 35,000 doses of the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine and 4,000 doses of the Moderna vaccine.

Pfizer

Ontario is developing a web portal for booking COVID-19 vaccine appointments when mass immunization is underway.

The Ministry of Health said Monday that Ontario is developing an online site for vaccine appointments, while a customer service desk will also eventually be available for those not comfortable using the web portal.

The booking system will be part of the province’s vaccine rollout, which on Sunday was updated to identify adults aged 80 and older, seniors in congregate care and Indigenous adults among those next in line for a shot.

However, some experts are calling for additional measures to ensure vulnerable populations who don’t have immediate access to technology or who can’t make the trip to mass vaccination sites are not left out.

Pfizer

The city of Ottawa had about 11.32 per cent of its residents receiving the Canada Emergency Response Benefit (CERB) last year.

An analysis of federal data by The Canadian Press shows that the city had on average 50,120 recipients during each four-week pay period for the pandemic aid.

Across the Ottawa River, The city of Gatineau, Que., had about 10.11 per cent of its residents receiving CERB. That amounts to an average of 24,189 recipients during each four-week pay period for the pandemic aid.

Over its lifespan between late March and October of last year, the CERB paid out nearly $82 billion to 8.9 million people in Canada whose incomes crashed either because they saw their hours slashed or lost their jobs.

CERB–With files from The Canadian Press.

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Trudeau 'very optimistic' vaccine rollout can be accelerated and move closer to U.S. goals – National Post

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Trudeau held to his September target, but said with vaccine deliveries being moved up and new candidates being approved, the timeline could be moved up

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OTTAWA – Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said Wednesday morning he was hopeful Canada’s vaccine timelines could be moved up, but offered no assurance the vaccine rollout here won’t be completed months after the United States.

But late on Wednesday afternoon, a national panel of vaccine experts recommended extending the interval between the two doses of a COVID-19 shot when faced with a limited supply.

Canada’s National Advisory Committee on Immunization’s updated guidance is for the administration of all COVID-19 vaccines currently approved for use in Canada. It says extending the dose interval to four months will create opportunities to protect the entire adult population against the virus within a shorter timeframe.

U.S. President Joe Biden said Tuesday evening America would have enough vaccines delivered to cover the entire population by late May. The rollout of those vaccines into arms will follow, but America is still likely to be able to vaccinate its entire population months ahead of Canada.

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Trudeau’s long-held timeline is to have all Canadians vaccinated by the end of September. He held to that target at his Wednesday morning press conference, but said with vaccine deliveries being moved up and new candidates being approved, it is possible the timeline could be moved up.

“We’re very optimistic that we’re going to be able to accelerate some of these timelines,” he said. “We’re going to continue to do everything we can to allow our population to get through this challenge as quickly as possible,” he said.

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Trudeau said COVID has had a much more devastating impact on the U.S. and that will have a significant impact on the recovery.

“Obviously, the pandemic has had a very different course in the United States with far greater death tolls and case counts and that has had its own impact on the American economy,” he said.

Conservative MP Michelle Rempel Garner, the party’s health critic, said the government should be providing a clearer, more detailed explanation of its vaccine plan, to help businesses have confidence about what comes next.

“We don’t have any of that data. We don’t actually know what the realistic time horizon is for delivery of vaccines,” she said.

With Canada set to be months behind the U.S., United Kingdom and potentially other countries in the rollout, Rempel Garner said the government should be offering information about what else it will do to ease the pandemic in the meantime.

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“I think we’ll have a problem on compliance and certainty for business reopening, so this is why we’re saying look, be honest with Canadians, and then let’s work together to come up with a plan B,” she said. “COVID fatigue is a real thing. There’s a lot of frustration.”

Trudeau announced that both the government’s rent subsidy for small business and the wage subsidy will be extended into June as the pandemic continues. The extension of the rent subsidy is forecasted to cost an additional $2.1 billion and the wage subsidy will cost the government an additional $13.9 billion.

Finance Minister Chyrstia Freeland said the government would continue to support businesses with the goal of keeping the economy moving so it can resurge quickly when restrictions are lifted.

“Our government will continue to do whatever it takes for as long as it takes to help Canadians through this bleak time, to prevent economic scarring and invest in a way that allows us all to come roaring back,” she said.

Biden moved up his timeline to May, from what had been the end of July, after announcing the U.S. government had approved a third vaccine candidate from Johnson and Johnson. Canada is expected to approve that vaccine soon.

Canada received 500,000 doses of the AstraZeneca vaccine, the first shipment in a total of two million doses expected before mid-May, on top of a further 20 million doses expected between April and September.

Despite all the recent vaccine announcements, Trudeau said it was too early to formally move up the deadline, because there could still be issues with manufacturing or deliveries.

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“These are new processes for new vaccines that are being manufactured in the millions and even billions in order to cover everyone on Earth,” he said. “We’ll be facing continued challenges, which is one of the reasons why we made such a deliberate effort to sign more deals with more different companies than many of our fellow countries.”

While the Biden administration has said it won’t ship vaccines from the U.S. to other countries until all Americans are vaccinated, Trudeau said Biden knows the challenge is global.

“It was very clear that they understand, like us, we know that you don’t get through this pandemic, anywhere, not fully, until you get through it everywhere.”

— With files from The Canadian Press

• Email: rtumilty@postmedia.com | Twitter:

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Nova Scotia to accept shipment of AstraZeneca's COVID-19 vaccine – HalifaxToday.ca

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Nova Scotia has decided to receive its first shipment of the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine.

Next week, the province will get 13,000 doses of the third COVID-19 vaccine approved for use by Health Canada.

They don’t have a long shelf life and must be used by April 2.

Because of that, even though it is a two dose vaccine, the province announced today it plans to administer all of the supply as first doses. They will be going into the arms of Nova Scotians between the ages of 50 and 64 at 26 locations throughout the province on a first-come, first-served basis.

Earlier this week, the National Advisory Committee on Immunization recommended the Oxford-AstraZeneca only be used for people between the ages of 18 and 64.

“AstraZeneca is different than the two vaccines we’re using now,” explained the province’s chief medical officer of health at Tuesday’s briefing. “The Pfizer-BioNtech and the Moderna are mRNA vaccines, which have been shown to be 94 to 95 per cent effective in preventing symptomatic COVID-19 illness.”

“The AstraZeneca is slightly different. It’s called a viral-vector vaccine and it’s been shown to be about 62 per cent effective against preventing symptomatic illness.”

Because of that, Dr. Robert Strang said it won’t be used for any group considered to be a high risk for severe disease and/or exposure.

Unlike the mRNA vaccines, the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine does contain a virus, however the province says it isn’t the one that causes COVID-19. It’s a “different, harmless virus that triggers an immune response.”

The vaccine also doesn’t need the cold or ultra-low cold storage that the other two require. It can be stored between 2 and 8 degrees Celsius, which is similar to the standard flu vaccine.

Doctors Nova Scotia and the Pharmacy Association of Nova Scotia will be handling the launch.

“This vaccine provides another tool in our fight against COVID-19 and builds on the roll-out that is already underway in our province as we work to vaccinate all Nova Scotians,” said Premier Iain Rankin in a news release. “We have to move fast as we are mindful of the fact that we have a short window to use it given that they will expire in a month.”

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Redacted Novavax COVID-19 vaccine contract for Canada released in U.S. regulatory filings – National Post

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All of Canada’s seven vaccine contracts have been kept confidential since they were signed last year and the government has fought against their disclosure

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OTTAWA – Canada’s agreement with COVID-19 vaccine manufacturer Novavax has been released in regulatory filings, showing the drug maker has set delivery schedules, but also has broad leeway to miss them for a variety of reasons.

Novavax was the fifth vaccine maker to submit their COVID-19 vaccine to Health Canada for regulatory approval and could be given the green light as early as April. The company has a deal to provide at least 52 million doses and as many as 76 million doses of its two-dose vaccine to Canada.

All of Canada’s seven vaccine contracts have been kept confidential since they were signed last year and the government has fought moves in parliament to force the disclosure of the contracts. The released contract is still heavily redacted, with all the details on price, deliveries and penalties for missed timelines for Novavax blacked out.

The contract, filed with the U.S Securities and Exchange Commission on Monday, does specifically acknowledge there are many problems that could prevent the company from making its deliveries on time.

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“Customer acknowledges that the delivery schedule may change due to several variables. Including but not limited to speed of clinical trial enrolment and accrual of events, manufacturing delays and/or timing of regulatory approval,” reads the contract. It also specifies the delivery schedule is an “estimate only.”

Under the deal, Novavax is set to deliver vaccines monthly to Canada and like other vaccine manufacturers has quarterly targets, though the specifics of those targets are redacted from the deal. The government agreed to pay up front for the vaccines, in part because the company agreed to manufacture doses ahead of regulatory approval so they can be moved out quickly after the vaccine is approved.

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The company’s CEO has said they could produce as many as 150 million doses per month starting in May. They have also signed deals with the United Kingdom, United States and several other countries, but Canada is one of the biggest orders.

If Novavax misses targets it has the opportunity to catch up and if they continue to fail Canada has the ability to cancel the agreement. Canada paid an upfront payment, but it is unclear how much Canada would be out if it cancelled the contract.

The deal does specify the company has to make “commercially reasonable efforts” to deliver on the contract, a phrase, which also exists in the company’s contracts with U.K. and Australia, though its specific definition is redacted.

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On deliveries, the U.K. and Australia’s contract includes similar language, but the U.K deal includes lots of specifics on the company’s commitment to attempt to manufacture the vaccine in British facilities.

Medical lab scientists work on samples collected in the Novavax phase 3 COVID-19 clinical vaccine trial at Harborview Medical Center on February 12, 2021 in Seattle, Washington.
Medical lab scientists work on samples collected in the Novavax phase 3 COVID-19 clinical vaccine trial at Harborview Medical Center on February 12, 2021 in Seattle, Washington. Photo by Karen Ducey/Getty Images

The company has also signed a deal to produce its vaccine on Canadian soil, at the National Research Council’s under construction facility in Montreal, but that was not part of the original agreement.

The Montreal facility is expected to take until late December to actually produce doses, and Canada’s first shipments are expected to come from other countries.

The regulatory documents include the detail that the company is committed to go further and will expand its presence in Canada

“The MOU also includes a broader intention for the Government of Canada and us to work together to increase our Canadian presence,” reads the filling. “We will explore a range of partnership opportunities for us to expand vaccine production in Canada, including partnerships with Canadian contract manufacture.”

• Email: rtumilty@postmedia.com | Twitter:

Comments

Postmedia is committed to maintaining a lively but civil forum for discussion and encourage all readers to share their views on our articles. Comments may take up to an hour for moderation before appearing on the site. We ask you to keep your comments relevant and respectful. We have enabled email notifications—you will now receive an email if you receive a reply to your comment, there is an update to a comment thread you follow or if a user you follow comments. Visit our Community Guidelines for more information and details on how to adjust your email settings.

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