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Covid-19: Kelowna General Hospital 'swamped', some surgeries being rescheduled – Vancouver Sun

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“Our hospital is swamped with Covid patients,” wrote Eeson, adding they are “almost entirely unvaccinated.”

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PENTICTON — COVID-19 outbreaks at two Central Okanagan seniors’ care homes are growing and surgeries at Kelowna General Hospital are being rescheduled because of a rise in COVID cases.

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With the entire Central Okanagan a hotspot for a fourth wave of the virus, and subject to enhanced regional restrictions, Interior Health says 22 cases of COVID-19 have now been reported at West Kelowna’s Brookhaven Care Centre — five residents and 17 staff.

Last Thursday, four residents there were reported as testing positive and nine staff members.

At Cottonwoods Care Centre in Kelowna, there are now 11 cases reported — eight residents and three staff, up from just four cases among residents on Thursday.

And the overall picture is not getting any better across the Central Okanagan, where there has been a provincially ordered return to restrictions on mask-wearing in indoor public spaces, limits on gathering sizes, restrictions on restaurant operations and the closure of some businesses altogether because of the growing number of COVID-19 infections.

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New cases in the Central Okanagan are now almost all the delta variant of the virus and provincial officials say it is mainly unvaccinated people in the 20- to 40-year-old age range who are becoming infected.

Earlier this week, a local oncologist at Kelowna General Hospital, Dr. Gareth Eeson, took to Twitter saying he felt “awful” that one of his patients, as well as other KGH patients, had their scheduled treatments cancelled because of a lack of available beds at KGH.

“Our hospital is swamped with Covid patients,” wrote Eeson, adding they are “almost entirely unvaccinated.”

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Situations such as that have promoted more people to speak out and urge the unvaccinated to get the vaccine, not only for their own health but for the health of others.

Another local physician, Dr. Megan Hill, also took to Twitter this week to say she has seen firsthand that people filling KGH beds suffering from COVID-19 are not vaccinated.

“We need to keep having these talks,” she wrote. “Until it’s done.”

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In an email, Interior Health confirmed COVID patients are taking up more space at KGH.

“Kelowna General Hospital is currently supporting a higher number of COVID-19 positive patients due to the central Okanagan outbreak,” the email said. “Some elective surgeries have been rescheduled to manage capacity at the hospital. Affected patients are being notified directly to reschedule their procedure.

“The majority of people in hospital with COVID-19 are young adults who are not fully immunized.”

According to provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry, one of the reasons for cancellations of surgeries at KGH is a number of health-care workers have been “affected” by COVID-19. Henry made the comments Tuesday during a briefing on the wildfires in B.C. but did not elaborate.

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“That has put additional challenges, particularly on Kelowna General Hospital. That has been part of the reason why some of the surgeries have been cancelled in that facility,” said Henry.

According to the B.C. Centre for Disease Control on Tuesday, there were 27 people hospitalized with COVID-19 in the Interior Health region, 10 in intensive care.

In a bid to try and get more people vaccinated, mobile immunization clinics are being held in various venues in Kelowna and West Kelowna.

The province recently announced it had lowered the amount of time between getting the first and second dose of the vaccine to 28 days.


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Goodbye Pfizer, hello Comirnaty: Top COVID-19 vaccines given brand names in Canada – CBC.ca

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Health Canada has approved brand names for Pfizer, Moderna and Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccines and announced the change on social media today.

The Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine has now been dubbed Comirnaty, which the company says represents a combination of the terms COVID-19, mRNA, community, and immunity.

The Moderna vaccine will go by SpikeVax and the AstraZeneca vaccine will be named Vaxzevria.

Pfizer and Moderna say the change marks the full approval of the vaccines by Health Canada, which were previously approved under an interim order that was set to expire today.

During the interim order, the vaccines didn’t go by their brand names, but now that new and more long-term data has been submitted and approved they will go by their permanent name.

“Health Canada’s approval of Comirnaty for individuals ages 12 and older affirms the vaccine’s safety and efficacy shown in longer term data submitted to Health Canada — and hopefully that licensure may improve vaccine confidence among Canadians,” Pfizer spokesperson Christina Antoniou wrote in a statement.

It’s the first time SpikeVax, until now known as the Moderna vaccine, has been fully approved anywhere in the world, Stephane Bancel, the company’s CEO, said in a press release Thursday.

Health Canada points out the vaccines themselves are not changing — only the names are.

Although the name change has been approved, Canada will still receive vials labelled Pfizer-BioNTech for the next several months.

The FDA approved new names in the United States earlier this summer, and the vaccines have been going by their brand names in the EU since the spring.

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Better mental health support needed for pregnant individuals during Covid-19 pandemic: Study – Hindustan Times

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Better mental health support needed for pregnant individuals during Covid-19 pandemic: Study(Unsplash)

Better mental health support needed for pregnant individuals during Covid-19 pandemic: Study

  • A new study finds that more mental health support is needed for pregnant people during the pandemic after it was found that nearly three-quarters of individuals who were pregnant during this time reported moderate to high levels of distress. 
ANI | , Toronto [canada]
UPDATED ON SEP 16, 2021 11:18 AM IST

A team of researchers suggested that more mental health support is needed for pregnant individuals after a survey found nearly three-quarters of individuals who had been pregnant during the pandemic reported moderate to high levels of distress, and one in five experienced depressive symptoms.

The findings of the study appeared in the journal titled ‘Canadian Family Physician’.

The researchers, led by clinicians at Unity Health Toronto, surveyed nearly 1,500 participants online – 87 per cent of whom were Canadian – who had been pregnant during the Covid-19 pandemic. Nearly 69 per cent of respondents reported moderate to high levels of distress and 20 per cent had depressive symptoms.

“The high levels of distress highlight the importance of considering mental health centrally in support for this population,” said Dr Tali Bogler, study lead author and family physician and chair of family medicine obstetrics at St. Michael’s Hospital of Unity Health Toronto.

“The findings also highlight the overall impact the pandemic has had on families in general and the downstream impact this will have,” added Dr Bogler.

A limitation of the study was that it did not have comparable data on distress levels among pregnant people prior to the pandemic. However, a population-based survey conducted in Japan before the pandemic found 28 to 32 per cent of pregnant people reported distress.

Researchers also sought to learn more about what the common sources of concern were for expectant parents during the pandemic. Participants were provided with a list of 27 concerns and asked to indicate their level of concern for each issue.

The top five concerns during pregnancy included: hospital policies regarding support persons in labour; not being able to introduce their baby to loved ones; getting sick from Covid-19 while pregnant; not being able to rely on family or friends after labour for support; and conflicting medical information on Covid-19 in pregnancy and newborns, especially early in the pandemic.

There were differences in the concerns of first-time and second/third-time parents. First-time parents were more concerned about the cancellation of in-person prenatal classes and hospital tours, whereas second/third-time parents were more concerned about the transmission of Covid-19 from older children in the home.

The authors said that family physicians are well placed to support perinatal mental health and can engage in screening practices and offer appropriate treatment, such as counselling, public health nursing, and psychiatric appointments. They also recommend hospitals better utilize technology to help address parents’ concerns by arranging more virtual check-ins and hospital tours and provide more online resources with evidence-based information on Covid-19 relevant to expectant and new parents.

ALSO READ: Pregnancy cravings out of control? Here’s what you MUST know to contain them

“Clinicians and hospital administrators need to explore innovative ways to increase perinatal support,” said Dr Bogler, who is also one of the leads of the Pandemic Pregnancy Guide, a virtual platform that provides medical information on pregnancy and Covid-19 and helps form a community for expecting parents during the pandemic. 

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This story has been published from a wire agency feed without modifications to the text. Only the headline has been changed.

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‘No longer safe’: Family flees Manitoba city over COVID-19 attitudes – Flipboard

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Ridin’ Dirty: Guinea Pigs Cruise Around in Style

Two summer-ready guinea pigs took a ride in a remote-controlled car in Montreal, Quebec.The footage was captured by Melissa Trihey, who regularly documents the adventures of her pet guinea pigs, pugs,…

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