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Danny Green on Rudy Gobert’s COVID-19 diagnosis

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As the world continues to navigate the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, many in the sports community have criticized Utah Jazz centre Rudy Gobert for making light of coronavirus concerns by purposely touching every microphone while leaving a press podium — an action that preceded him testing positive for the novel coronavirus and, in turn, setting off a sequence of events that led to the suspension of the NBA season.

Los Angeles Lakers guard Danny Green is choosing to find a silver lining in the situation, though.

“I feel like people are blaming him for a lot of things when, obviously he was a little careless at times, but who’s to say that’s necessarily the reason why that’s happened?” Green said in a FaceTime interview with Taylor Rooks of Bleacher Report. “He probably should have been more careful, but it’s not all his fault.

“…you got to look at the positives in things. This was gonna happen regardless of whether it was gonna happen to him or somebody else. Somebody in the NBA was gonna catch the virus and give us a wake up call. I think it was needed. It was necessary for us to — not just for the basketball world, but for the rest of the world — to take it seriously.”

Shortly after Gobert’s positive diagnosis, the NBA enacted what has become a 30-day hiatus on its season. The NHL followed suit, putting its season on pause, and MLB pushed back its season’s start date by two weeks and cancelled the remainder of spring training. March Madness, the annual tournament of the NCAA’s finest college basketball teams, was cancelled, too.

“Adam Silver has made the correct call,” Green said. “NCAA’s made the correct calls, of cancelling games or postponing them. But this wouldn’t have happened if hadn’t Rudy caught it. So I’m glad things happened the way they did.

“Obviously the carelessness of it — I don’t think he should be blamed or bashed as much as he is. I mean, it could happen to anybody. …They’re showing clips [of Gobert being careless, touching microphones] but they can find clips of anything from any time — of him being careless, but I’m sure a lot people not just him, [too].

“…I think it’s something that, you know, not just the NBA needed, but the world needed.”

In addition to Gobert testing positive, Donovan Mitchell, his Jazz co-star, tested positive as well. Based on Mitchell’s most recent public update, his recovery is going well.

Members of the Toronto Raptors, who played Gobert and the Jazz prior to the NBA’s shutdown, also received tests for the COVID-19 virus. All of those tests came back negative.

In the days since his positive diagnosis, Gobert has openly acknowledged and apologized for the carelessness of his actions and hopes that people can learn from his mistakes.

“I want to thank everyone for the outpouring of concern and support over the last 24 hours,” Gobert wrote in an Instagram post. “I have gone through so many emotions since learning of my diagnosis… mostly fear, anxiety, and embarrassment.

“The first and most important thing is I would like to publicly apologize to the people that I may have endangered. At the time, I had no idea I was even infected. I was careless and make no excuse. I hope my story serves as a warning and causes everyone to take this seriously. I will do whatever I can to support using my experience as way to educate others and prevent the spread of this virus.”

The following day, Gobert offered the first of what he said will be “many steps” he will take to help with the novel coronavirus pandemic, pledging Saturday to donate more than $500,000 to relief efforts.

That contribution includes giving $200,000 to part-time employees at the arena that plays host to Jazz games to help cover their lost wages, $100,000 each to assist families affected by the pandemic in Oklahoma City — where he was when the diagnosis came — and Utah, as well as 100,000 Euros ($111,450 USD) to relief efforts in France, earmarked for childcare assistance to health care workers as well as for caregivers to the elderly.

As the novel coronavirus continues to spread, both worldwide and throughout the United States, there is currently no guaranteed timeline of when any of the major professional sports leagues will return to action.

Despite Green’s ability to find the silver lining in the way Gobert’s diagnosis ushered in a new level of awareness regarding COVID-19, he was open about the frustrations of being away from the game he loves, too.

For Green, one week without basketball when your whole life revolves around the sport is a difficult adjustment.

“I think, you know, a week away from basketball for us is like a long period of time,” Green said. “Obviously it’s still fresh, it’s only a couple of days, but a week from now, guys are gonna be very bored and not know what to do with their idle time. They want to get back in the gym and play.”

Amid the uncertainty, the former member of the NBA Champion Toronto Raptors is choosing to stay present and focus on the moment directly in front of him.

“It’s not something you think would ever happen,” Green said. “It’s kind of like a bad movie or nightmare. …It’s tough to swallow. It’s tough to believe. But we’re here now. We’re taking it a step at a time, minute by minute, hour by hour, day by day. And getting updates as often as we can, and figuring out the necessary steps to move forward and get things back to normal.”

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Senators who tested positive for coronavirus have recovered, coach says – NHL.com

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The six members of the Ottawa Senators organization who tested positive for the coronavirus, including two players, have recovered, according to coach D.J. Smith.

“Everyone’s doing good,” he said Wednesday. “The good thing is that everyone that had [the coronavirus] didn’t have horrible symptoms, you know, what we’re seeing on TV and in some of the people that have really struggled. Some guys didn’t feel well. But being athletes, they all got through it.

“And they’re all on the other side of it now. … I think it’s important that you see this disease doesn’t spare anyone … actors and actresses, rich, poor, you’ve got to make sure that you stay safe, and I’m really glad that everyone that was involved in our organization and on that plane (during a three-game trip through California from March 7-11) is now doing well.

“But certainly, a scary time. … It hit us, but at the same point, probably saved a lot of us too. … We probably got a little bit of a jump on this.”

The Senators played in the last NHL game before the season was paused March 12 due to concerns surrounding the coronavirus, a 3-2 loss at the Los Angeles Kings on March 11.

“Guys were aware that an NBA player tested positive that afternoon, or right around 5:00, but us being out on the West [Coast], we were ahead of it,” said Smith, who is in his first season as an NHL coach. “And there was some question whether we were going to play. … It certainly was a different atmosphere than any other game I’ve been a part of. We just waited for direction from the League.”

The Senators are 25-34-12 and in seventh place in the Atlantic Division, but Smith said he’s optimistic they will finish strong if the season resumes and go into the offseason feeling good about themselves, especially off their play at Canadian Tire Centre, where Ottawa is 18-13-6.

“I’m hopeful that we can get out of the house and get back to work and get joking with the guys,” Smith said. “We want to finish on the right note and finish with the message of how we’re going to work right to the very end, to the very last buzzer, and give the fans what they deserve. I think this season at home, they got to see how hard we played, and we wanted to play right to the end tough. So certainly, I want to get back.

“But we’ll just listen to the guidance from the NHL. We’re going to play hockey at some point, it’s just a matter of when.”

The Senators have not identified the players who tested positive for coronavirus.

Smith said he’s looking forward to watching players like 20-year-old forward Brady Tkachuk, 23-year-old defenseman Thomas Chabot and 23-year-old center Colin White continue to develop when Ottawa begins playing again.

The Senators will have to return with a positive mindset, he said, in order to improve and get back to the Stanley Cup Playoffs; they have not qualified for the postseason since 2016-17, when they lost to the eventual champions, the Pittsburgh Penguins, in overtime of Game 7 of the Eastern Conference Final.

“Our mentality has to change,” Smith said. “It’s time for us to take a step, and how big a step that is, we’re going to find out. But we want to take a step, certainly mentally, and that’s with the Tkachuks and Chabots and Whites and these guys, so that when you watch the best teams in the League, the Washington Capitals, the Boston Bruins, when they come to the arena they expect to win every night.

“There’s a difference between expecting and knowing that you can win every night, and in time with as many good young players that we have and all the draft picks we have, we’re going to be one of those teams. Everyone wants it to be sooner than later.”

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Tom Brady goes there with Howard Stern, re Belichick – Toronto Sun

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Now former Patriots QB dishes for more than two hours

Tom Brady guested for more than two hours Wednesday on Howard Stern’s unsensored SiriusXM Radio show.

And, yes, the no-holds-barred host went far down every audacious and raunchy road with his questions for the star NFL quarterback — from how often he has sex with his supermodel wife Giselle Bundchen (enough, Brady said) to whether he has suffered concussions in football (multiple, Brady said).

Mostly, though, Stern kept drilling deep down into the relationship the new Tampa Bay Buccaneers starting passer had with his now former head coach in New England, Bill Belichick.

Brady — who revealed he had been a huge fan of Stern for years — obliged throughout with thoughtful, revealing answers to almost every one of Stern’s questions, no matter how probing, playful or crass.

The 42-year-old granted Stern a level of access and on-the-record frankness every NFL reporter this century has dreamed of.

Among Brady’s top revelations about his departure from Foxboro:

On whether he ever asked Belichick to pull a lazy or failing receiver out of the lineup:

“I (could) definitely express my opinion to say, ‘If you put him out there, I’m not going to throw him the ball because the whole team is trusting me to do what’s right by the team. So you can’t put someone out there that I don’t believe in — because if I don’t believe in him, then it’s worthless for the team.’

“Fortunately for me, coach Belichick always saw it the same way as me, which is why I think we have such a great connection … I think that’s why I was a great fit for that system, because we saw the process of winning very much the same way.

“Rarely did I ever need to go up to a guy and say, ‘Listen, you’re f—ing the team.’ He would know that from someone else before I would ever need to get to him.”

On whether he sensed Belichick was ever resentful that his successes in New England always were seen as joint successes with Brady — and whether he thought, “F— Belichick. I’m the reason for our success here”:

“I think it’s a pretty s–tty argument, actually, that people would say that.”

Brady said he would not have been as successful in New England if Belichick weren’t his head coach.

“But I feel the same in, in vice versa as well. To have him allowed me to be the best that I could be. So I’m grateful for that. And very much believe that he feels the same about me, because we have expressed that to each other.”

On whether Brady resents Belichick for not making him a Patriot for life:

“No. Absolutely not.”

Because moving on to Tampa Bay is a chance, he said, “to experience something that’s very different. There are ways for me to grow and evolve in a different way that I haven’t had the opportunity to do — that aren’t right or wrong, but just right for me.”

On whether not retiring as a Patriot might affect his legacy:

“I never cared about legacy. I couldn’t give a s–t about it … It was because it was just time (to leave) … I accomplished everything I could in two decades with an incredible organization, and an incredible group of people. And that will never change, and no one can take that away from me … or us.”

On rumours Belichick wanted to bring in a new quarterback in recent years, perhaps, in part, to prove he could continue the Patriots’ winning ways without Brady — and whether Brady viewed that as disloyalty to him, and whether it influenced his decision to leave:

“I think he has a lot of loyalty. He and I have had a lot of conversations that nobody has ever been privy to, and nor should they be. So many wrong assumptions were made about our relationship, or about how he felt about me. I know genuinely how he feels about me. Now I’m not going to respond to every rumour or assumption that’s made, other than what his responsibility as coach is to try to get the best player for the team not only in the short term but in the long-term as well. So what I could control is trying to be the best I could be in both of those situations also. So I got into unchartered territory as an athlete because I started to break the mould of what so many other athletes had experienced. I got to the point where I was an old — or an older athlete — and he’s starting to plan for the future, which is what his responsibility is. And I don’t fault him for that. That’s what he should be doing. That’s what every coach should be doing … I recognized that. We talked about it.”

On when he decided when he wanted to move on from New England:

“I don’t think there was every a final, final decision. But I would say I probably knew before the start of last season that it was my last year. And I knew that our time was coming to an end.”

On saying goodbye to Patriots owner Robert Kraft in person a few weeks ago and together calling Belichick to likewise inform him:

“Yeah, I was crying. I’m a very emotional person.”

On why he didn’t have more in-depth talks with the Las Vegas Raiders:

They could probably speak to that more than me … There were probably a lot of different teams that were interested in me, I would say.”

He would not elaborate on how many teams, or which others.

JoKryk@postmedia.com

@JohnKryk

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Lafreniere on what he can bring to a team; Byfield talks Malkin comparisons – TSN

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The NHL released their final rankings for 2020 NHL Entry Draft Wednesday and Alexis Lafreniere and Quinton Byfield were first and second among North American skaters.

The two talked about the upcoming draft on Wednesday after the rankings were unveiled.

Alexis Lafreniere

On his excitement for the Draft:

“Growing up it’s the dream of every hockey player. To see how close we are right now it’s exciting. It’s really fun, I think we’re all excited for the draft. The team that’s going to draft me, I’m going to be really happy to join them and try to have as much success as I can.”

On his skills and being ranked No. 1:

“I’m a leader and I always want to win. When the game’s on the line I can make a difference and I think that’s a strong asset that I have. For sure there are some other really good players in the draft so it’s really special to be (ranked) No. 1 for sure.”

On the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic situation:

“It’s a pretty weird situation that we’re in right now but I think everyone is doing their best to stay fit and personally I train at home. It’s not the same but I’ll try to stay fit and spend time with my family that I don’t see really often during the season. I try to spend as much time as I can with my family and try to train as hard as I can.”

Quinton Byfield

On how he’d describe his game:

“It was definitely a big year for me. I think I’d describe myself as a hockey player as a big, two-way forward that tries to play a 200-foot game … I think the strongest part of my game is definitely my skating for a big guy. I try to use that to my advantage and find my teammates in the offensive zone and set them up.”

On comparisons to a current NHL player:

“I’ve definitely drawn a couple comparisons out there. I think Evgeni Malkin, that’s just an honour to be compared to that guy. He’s a (future) Hall of Famer. I’m definitely watching as many Penguins games as possible just to see what he does on the ice and how he plays. He’s a big 200-foot centre and the amazing offensive ability he has and how he plays is just unbelievable. I definitely watch him quite a bit and try and mold my game after him.”

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