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Democratic control of U.S. Senate could be good news for Canada, expert says – CTV News

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TORONTO —
Democrats took back control of the U.S. Senate on Tuesday after winning two hard-fought runoff elections in Georgia, granting president-elect Joe Biden far greater leeway to turn his campaign promises into reality.

The victories by Jon Ossoff and Raphael Warnock give Democrats and Republicans each 50 seats in the U.S. Senate. That means any ties on the Senate floor will be settled by vice-president-elect Kamala Harris.

Biden and Harris campaigned on a platform that experts say could have wide-ranging impacts on Canadian industries and political relations. Now that Democrats have won full control of Congress, here’s a look at how the new political landscape could have ripple-effects north of the border.

DEMAND FOR CANADIAN EXPORTS

Senate control means Democrats will have an easier time passing additional stimulus money they’ve been pushing for. Speaking ahead of the Georgia runoffs, Biden said that $2,000 stimulus cheques would be sent out “immediately” should Democrats win both races.

More stimulus money could buoy the American economy and would “certainly benefit” Canadian exporters that rely on U.S. markets, according to Wayne Petrozzi, a professor emeritus from Ryerson University.

“That stimulus will increase the appetites of Americans for imports and keep American manufacturing facilities running that need raw materials. So I think that certainly impacts Canada in a positive way,” Petrozzi told CTVNews.ca on Wednesday.

Biden has also promised more funding for cities struggling with falling tax revenue amid the pandemic. A financial lift could be good news for Canadian manufacturers that make light rail, buses or other transit options.

“I think generally the stimulus, in terms of payments to individuals … will just have the effect of generally putting a floor under the American economy and increasing confidence amongst manufacturers to bring back staff in some cases or to increase production. And the demand for Canadian raw materials is going to be there.”

But Petrozzi also pointed out that the filibuster — a procedural way of delaying a vote on the Senate floor — could still be a serious procedural headache for Democrats. Because of this, he expects Biden to use plenty of executive orders, not unlike Trump did, to carry out his agenda.

HARD PIVOT ON CLIMATE CHANGE

Biden has promised to put the U.S. back into the Paris climate change pact and roll out a suite of domestic policies that cut back on emissions, a move that experts have previously said would be good news for Canadian industries currently competing against American companies with fewer environmental regulations.

Biden has also issued a US$1.7-trillion “Clean Energy Revolution” plan that includes investing heavily in green technology and aggressively pursuing making the U.S. power sector emissions-free by 2035. The goal is to position the U.S. as a leader in green tech and create thousands of new jobs.

Getting that high-budget plan through a Republican-controlled Senate would’ve been an uphill battle, but Democrats may now face fewer roadblocks in passing such legislation.

If the Biden administration makes good on those big-budget green promises, they could spur greater competition in Canada, according to Ryan Katz-Rosene, an associate professor at the University of Ottawa who researches environmental policy, in an earlier interview with CTVNews.ca. In particular, green hydrogen, a clean but costly alternative to fossil fuels, could see some healthy market competition.

“If the U.S. is pouring trillions of dollars into green tech, that changes the situation,” he said. “All of a sudden, Canadian producers of green hydrogen … they start saying, ‘Now we need to ramp things up.’”

TAXING BIG TECH

Biden has made clear that he wants to increase the overall corporate tax rate and make sure that big tech companies, such as Amazon and Netflix, pay their fair share.

“Let me be clear: Hardworking Americans should not be paying more in federal income taxes than Amazon or Netflix,” Biden tweeted four days before the election.

In Australia, the government has taken steps to force Facebook and Alphabet, the parent company of Google, to share advertising revenue with local media firms. The United Kingdom has passed a digital services tax in hopes of getting companies such as Amazon, Google and Facebook to pay higher domestic taxes.

The Canadian government has announced its own plans to require multinational companies like Netflix and Amazon to collect GST or HST on digital products and services in 2021.

If the Biden administration cracks down on big tech companies, it could inspire Canada to go even further with its own plans, Petrozzi said.

“The fact that the incoming administration is likely moving in a similar direction can’t hurt, it can only help us,” he said.

FIGHTING COVID-19, REOPENING BORDER

Biden has vowed to aggressively clamp down on the spread of COVID-19 in the U.S. by signing a mask mandate on his first day in office and by vaccinating 100 million Americans in his first 100 days in office.

Trump has not gone as far in pushing for universal masking and has, at times, encouraged anti-mask protesters who defied their state’s lockdown measures.

With Democrats controlling Congress, they could push through even tougher measures designed to mitigate the outbreak, Petrozzi said.

“I think the renewed and increased emphasis on coming to terms with and conquering the current pandemic in the United States will have very significant economic benefits,” he said.

He points to industries such as cross-border tourism or Toronto’s convention centres, which have greatly suffered due to the border shutdown. The sooner the U.S. flattens the curve and follows through on widespread vaccinations, the sooner life can return to normal, Petrozzi said.

“There is tremendous pent-up demand on the American side for travel. Canada has always been a favourite economic destination. Our government with the current Trump administration was never going to open those borders. You’d have to be out of your mind to open Windsor given what was happening in Michigan.”

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Stuck in South Africa, new travel rules put this Canadian's trip home for the holidays at risk – CBC.ca

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Andrew Neumann’s hopes of making it home for the holidays have been cast into doubt by the emergence of the omicron coronavirus variant and the swift implementation of new pandemic border restrictions around the world.

“It’s actually a particularly sensitive time,” Neumann, a Canadian living in South Africa, said in an interview on CBC’s The House that aired Saturday. His son just started university in Toronto, his first year away from home, he explained. And there are other pressing concerns.

“My wife’s father is very ill. He’s in his 80s. He’s undergoing chemotherapy…. Likewise, my mother’s 91. She’s in sort of cognitive decline. I haven’t seen her in two years,” he told host Chris Hall.

“And there’s a question mark again in my mind: Am I going to be able to say goodbye?” Neumann said.

20:23Borders tighten again

Public Safety Minister Marco Mendicino discusses new restrictions and testing measures at the border and Peel Region medical officer of health Dr. Lawrence Loh explains how his jurisdiction is dealing with concerns about omicron. 20:23

Neumann has lived in Johannesburg since 2015. He was planning to return to Canada for the holidays when new travel restrictions were put in place affecting travellers from 10 countries, mostly in southern Africa. Canadians trying to come home from those countries must now meet a series of additional testing and quarantine requirements.

Travellers must get a pre-departure molecular COVID-19 test 72 hours ahead of their departure, something Canadians are now used to, but that test must be in a third country — not any of the 10 on Canada’s list. Neumann was planning to get a test during his connection in Germany, but additional rules put in place there have made that impossible.

Canadian, German restrictions clash

A letter Neumann received from the Canadian High Commission in South Africa said German airline Lufthansa would not allow Canadians to board because of that third-country testing requirement and restrictions put in place by Germany.

Neumann’s situation closely resembles that of the Canadian junior women’s field hockey team, which has also been stuck in South Africa. The team has asked for an exemption to leave the country.

Andrew Neumann and his family have been trying to come back to Canada from South Africa. (Submitted)

Neumann said he has been struck by what he says is the “cavalier” way the government has answered the questions of would-be travellers whose plans the restrictions have thrown into limbo.

He also says the restrictions themselves make little sense given what we now know about the spread of the omicron variant.

“It just seems so disproportionate a response to southern Africa versus the rest of the world that you have to question the motivations,” he said.

In an emailed response to CBC News, Global Affairs Canada said this country’s entry requirements are meant to ensure the safety of Canadians. It said that the implementation of restrictions could disrupt travel plans but that “the decision to travel is the sole responsibility of the individual.”

“We can confirm that we are receiving reports of Canadians abroad affected by these new measures,” the statement said.

Debate over travel ban effectiveness

In a separate interview on The House, Public Safety Minister Marco Mendicino said the restrictions are being implemented to give Canada the time to assess the risk of the omicron variant and “protect the progress” the country has made against the pandemic.

“I’d acknowledge that we’re at a moment where there will be some challenges, but we put in place public health measures because of the variant of concern.”

WATCH | New travel restrictions throw travel plans into chaos: 

Omicron variant renews uncertainty for travellers

3 days ago

The uncertainty around the omicron variant and new COVID-19 testing and isolation requirements has some wondering if international travel is about to be upended again. 2:04

There has been significant criticism of the travel measures put in place by Canada and other countries, with growing evidence that the new variant had been circulating in several nations before South African researchers first discovered it in late November and travel restrictions were imposed.

Part of the debate has centred on the efficacy of travel restrictions themselves, with some experts arguing they do little to stop the spread of a new variant. The president of South Africa called them “unscientific” and “discriminatory.”

Mendicino said the restrictions on the 10 countries were not politically motivated but instead based on science.

“We’re doing it because we want to protect Canadians. This is not their first go-around. We’ve done this drill before, and we want to make sure that we’re taking the right decision when it comes to protecting the health and safety of Canadians,” he said.

WATCH | Debate over the effectiveness of travel restrictions: 

Travel bans unfairly target country that identified omicron variant, specialist says

3 days ago

Dr. Samir Gupta, a respirologist and associate professor at the University of Toronto, says travel bans to prevent the omicron variant’s spread can buy time, but penalize the countries that identify new virus variants. 7:52

For one medical officer of health in Canada, the bans are of some use but should not be the focus of government.

“You know, the honest truth is that it probably would have limited impact overall, but it may help to slow the introduction of omicron,” said Dr. Lawrence Loh of Peel Region, which hosts Toronto’s Pearson International Airport.

For Neumann, it’s clear the travel bans are not justified.

“When we know now that it’s also everywhere else in the world suggests that poorer countries are at a disadvantage, certainly versus Europe and Canada and the U.S.,” he said.

Despite the challenges so far, Neumann now has a flight booked for next Friday and describes himself as “somewhat hopeful” his travel plans will work out.

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Russia says airliner had to lose height to avoid NATO spy plane

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A Russian Aeroflot airliner flying from Tel Aviv to Moscow was forced to change altitude over the Black Sea because a NATO CL-600 reconnaissance plane crossed its designated flight path, Russia’s state aviation authority said on Saturday.

The state airline said flight SU501 carrying 142 passengers had had to drop 2,000 feet on Friday after air traffic control told it that another aircraft had crossed its path.

The crew were able to see the other plane when they passed in the sky, it said in a separate statement.

The aviation authority, Rosaviatsia, said a smaller CL-650 aircraft flying from the Black Sea resort of Sochi to Skopje had also had to change its course.

It did not say which NATO member the reconnaissance aircraft belonged to. Russia’s Defence Ministry said on Friday it had scrambled fighter jets to escort two U.S. military reconnaissance planes over the Black Sea.

The U.S. Embassy in Moscow made no immediate comment about the incident when it was first reported by the Interfax news agency.

Rosaviatsia said an increase in flights by NATO aircraft in the region was creating risks for civilian planes and that Moscow planned to lodge a diplomatic complaint over them.

International tensions have been rising over Ukraine and the Black Sea region.

Kyiv and NATO powers accuse Russia of building up troops near Ukraine, sparking fears of a possible attack. Moscow denies any such plan and accuses Kyiv of building up its own forces in its east, where Russian-backed separatists control a large part of Ukrainian territory.

(Reporting by Tom Balmforth and Gleb Stolyarov; Editing by Helen Popper and Kevin Liffey)

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Omicron: Should you travel and what insurance will you need? – CTV News

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TORONTO —
Experts are divided on whether travel is advisable in light of the Omicron variant spurring restrictions at the border and new travel bans leading into the holiday season.

On Tuesday, the government announced travel bans for 10 countries and added that fully vaccinated travellers arriving by air from international destinations other than the U.S. would be required to take a PCR test upon arrival, and quarantine while awaiting the results.

Some travellers are having second thoughts amid the confusion, and Martin Firestone, president of Travel Secure Inc., told CTV News Channel that the confusion at airports over the new PCR test requirement is likely to grow.

“There’s nothing clearly stated as to how it’s going to work — are they getting it done there, are they lining up with thousands of other people, are they getting a take-home test, are they going to wait and isolate three days till test results — incredibly confusing right now, in all aspects,” he said.

“I’m seeing right now there’s many people that are making a decision to cancel their flights or cancel their trips.”

Firestone said that booking an international trip for January or February might not be the best idea.

“They maybe have to be on hold,” he said.

“I’m looking at summer 2022 as the best chance to start going to Europe and Asia and places such as that.”

So far, just how dangerous Omicron might be is unclear, making it another question in the calculus of whether travelling is advisable. Scientists are studying the variant in the hopes of pinpointing whether it causes more severe illness, but so far cases have shown largely mild symptoms, and no deaths have been connected to the variant.

However, preliminary data suggests that those who have previously had COVID-19 are at a higher risk of reinfection from Omicron than other variants.

Currently, there are 18 cases of Omicron in Canada.

Not everyone is jumping to cancellations, according to Richard Vanderlubbe, president of tripcentral.ca and a member of the board of directors for the Association of Canadian Travel Agencies (ACTA), but “new inquiries and new bookings have slowed down.”

“We were at about a 40 per cent of the 2019 level just prior to that,” he told CTVNews.ca in a phone interview. “And it was rising. So I think people are pausing and they’re trying to figure out what this means.”

Many who had planned Christmas trips are likely going to go through with them and simply plan for the added requirements at the border, he said, adding that whether to travel or not is up to where a person is going and how important it is to them to make that trip.

“I think what’s happening with government testing right now at airports is long overdue,” he said. “And we need to be able to create an environment where people are safe, that we’re vaccinated, […] the testing is available, it’s not [difficult] in terms of costs, that’s convenient and we get the results quickly.”

Firestone believes that it’ll be simplest to go to the U.S. this holiday season, if a person is set on getting away despite the added restrictions.

“Going to the U.S. right now, again, if everything’s properly done, including now the new one-day rapid test, negative test, that has to be done before you get into the U.S., that could still be plausible,” he said, adding that published health measures such as masking still need to be followed.

“But I think that’s the best bet at this point, is a U.S. holiday, possibly a sun destination holiday, although you’re going to face the large crowds coming back in, getting the negative PCR test. So it’s just nothing simple anymore, and I’m hoping that we get a bit of a holiday season and then travel eventually [can] open up again.”

IF I DO TRAVEL, SHOULD I GET INSURANCE?

Travellers worried about insurance should be aware of a couple things, Vanderlubbe said.

One is that since the blanket advisory against non-essential travel was lifted by the government in October, medical insurance policies for travel are now, in general, covering COVID-19 related medical claims, he explained.

“There was a time when the advisory was out that the insurance plans did not generally cover it,” he said. “And you had to buy separate insurance.”

When it comes to cancellation insurance, after some struggles earlier in the pandemic to get airlines to issue refunds when flights were cancelled by the airline itself, airlines are now generally covering any sort of involuntary cancellation where the airline decides not to operate the flight.

“There’s not a lot of risk now for consumers in booking something and then the government comes and, let’s say in the future slaps on a restriction on a certain destination and they cancel all the flights — you won’t lose your money,” Vanderlubbe said.

That leaves voluntary cancellation, which is when a person decides themselves that they no longer wish to fly.

“I’m looking at the arrangements and I’m looking at these things going on and maybe I’m getting cold feet and I don’t necessarily want to travel,” he explained.

Considering the shifting landscape right now, a traveller who is concerned that they may want to back out later — due to fears of COVID-19, due to falling ill themselves before the flight, or due to other unforeseen complications — may want to consider a waiver or other type of insurance that could aid them if they want to cancel a flight voluntarily.

“If you change your mind, at least you don’t lose all your money, you can rebook it as a credit,” Vanderlubbe said.

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