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Divorce art auction raises $676 million in New York – BBC News

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Sotheby's employees hold US artist Andy Warhol"s 'Nine Marilyn's'

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Paintings and sculptures by famous artists including Andy Warhol and Jackson Pollock have sold at auction in New York.

The collection raised more than $676 million (£503m) at auction on Monday.

The 35 pieces belonged to real estate mogul Harry Macklowe and his former wife Linda. The pair were told to sell the collection and split the proceeds during their 2018 divorce trial.

A further 35 pieces of art are set to go up for auction next year.

The items up for sale included “No 7”, a painting by Mark Rothko which sold for $82.5m – the second highest price for a piece by the artist.

It’s not clear who the buyer was but according to Reuters news agency, there was fierce bidding among people representing Asian clients.

“Number 17, 1951”, a piece by Jackson Pollock, fetched $61.2 million.

Andy Warhol’s “Nine Marilyn’s” silkscreen, which was made shortly after the actress Marilyn Monroe’s death, fetched $48.5 million.

The collection was estimated to be worth $400 million and had toured several locations including Taipei, Hong Kong, Paris and London before returning to New York.

Art dealer Andrew Fabricant told the New York Times that Linda Macklowe was the main collector and he had sold her many pieces that went up for auction on Monday.

“Every single work in here is subtle and unique,” he said.

The couple were granted a divorce last year after 59 years together. The pair could not come to an agreement on the value of the artworks and so a judge appointed an administrator to oversee the sale of the items.

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This AI art app is a glimpse at the future of synthetic media – The Verge

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If you’ve been hanging out on Twitter lately, then you’ve probably noticed a profusion of AI-generated images sprouting all over your timeline like weird, algorithmic visions. These pictures have been generated using a new app called Dream, which lets anyone create “AI-powered paintings” by simply typing a brief description of what they want to see. It’s odd, often uncanny stuff — and extremely fun.

The resulting artwork has its own particular aesthetic, defined by swirling shapes and incoherent objects. The real magic, though, is that no matter what you type, the app will generate something that is visually compelling (at least until we get too used to these toys) and that matches your prompt in often surprisingly apposite ways.

Consider, for example, the image below: “Galactic Archaeology With Metal-Poor Stars.” Not only has the app created a picture that captures the mind-boggling galactic scale of a nebula, but the star-like highlights dotted around the space are mostly blue — a tint that is scientifically accurate for metal-poor stars (as metallicity affects their color).

A few quick searches on Twitter reveal plenty more examples, but really, you should have a play with the app yourself to understand it better. (If nothing else, the images it generates are exactly the right size to create a personalized wallpaper for your phone.)

This sort of AI-generated artwork is not new, but it is becoming higher quality and more accessible. Past examples of these sorts of text-to-image models have included research-orientated programs like DALL-E and VQGAN+CLIP, as well as more specialized commercial projects like Artbreeder (which is particularly good at creating portraits of fictional beings and people). With tools such as these, the AI art scene has exploded in recent years, with practitioners creating everything from lifelike Roman emperors to infinite waifus.

The Dream app takes things a step further with its speed, quality, and accessibility. It’s available on iOS, Android, and the web and is the work of a Canadian startup named Wombo. The company previously made that AI-powered app that lets you feed in static images to create lip-synced renditions of memeable songs. What exactly powers Dream isn’t clear (we’ve contacted Wombo to find out), but a lot of AI art tech is open-source, which means the firm has likely built on past work to create the app.

Generally, programs like these are trained on vision datasets — huge libraries of images that are tagged based on objects and scenery. The programs pick out consistent patterns and themes in these images and then use this information to try and generate something that matches the users’ prompt. We don’t know what dataset Dream’s algorithms were trained on, but based on its output, it’s safe to say it includes a wide range of imagery — able to generate pictures that correspond to anime characters and video games.

The accessibility of Dream means it’s being put to novel uses, too. It’s been used for viral games (like inputting your PhD thesis title and sharing the result) and for more directed projects as well. In one amazing Twitter thread, the writer and illustrator Ursula Vernon (who publishes under the name T. Kingfisher) shared a short comic they’d made using Dream. The comic’s characters are drawn by hand, but the backgrounds are AI-generated, with the surreal, shifting quality of the images explained as a result of the setting: a dream library overseen by the Egyptian god of writing, Thoth.

Vernon tweeted about her experience, noting that she had to do a not-insignificant amount of work to prepare the images and that the inability of the program to create scenery from within a space with consistent architecture created its own challenges.

“In Conclusion—does it work visually? I think the answer is ‘sort of,’” tweeted Vernon. “I’m very aware of the weirdnesses as an artist, obviously. As a dream sequence, the messed up architecture kinda works, but how long can you get away with it? Sooner or later, the reader is probably gonna notice that nothing takes place in the same scene from a different angle.”

Despite its obvious limitations, Dream shows us a glimpse of the future of synthetic or AI-generated media. For evangelists in this space, the promise of the technology is one of infinite variety. In the future, they say, games, comics, films, and books will all be generated on the fly in response to our every prompt and whim. And although we’re a long, long way from such media matching the quality of human output, limited, hybrid applications will be coming sooner than you think — appearing like something first glimpsed in a dream.

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Clock Tower art heist: Artist Gail Ring had to fight to be compensated for an iconic Stoughton illustration – Stoughton Courier Hub

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Clock Tower art heist: Artist Gail Ring had to fight to be compensated for an iconic Stoughton illustration  Stoughton Courier Hub



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Call for Youth Artists! Mississauga Welcomes New Public Art Collaboration – City of Mississauga

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For the third year, the City of Mississauga is pleased to announce its Parks, Forestry and Environment x Public Art Collaboration. This iteration of the temporary public art program is taking place along the Malton Greenway featuring art that addresses environmental issues and creating opportunities for Mississauga youth.

SHEEEP, the lead artist of the collaboration, will create a performance-based, community-engaged temporary public art project that speaks to climate change, the importance of technology and greenspaces in urban settings. It includes components that are responsive to the area – such as sounds of a nearby creek and a thermometer showing the humidity of the park.

“I’m thankful that Malton has been selected to showcase this art installation highlighting a very important topic,” said Carolyn Parrish, Ward 5 Councillor. “This exciting project allows us the unique opportunity to connect with one another through art, casts a spotlight on global environmental issues and provides wonderful opportunities for our youth; all while providing great visibility to our community. I encourage all our Mississauga youth, especially those in the Malton area, to put forward applications for these opportunities.”

Two paid mentorship opportunities are available for Malton youth ages 16 to 29 interested in photography and videography. Applications will be open until January 10, 2022. Successful candidates will be involved in the project alongside the lead artist, SHEEEP.

“This project addresses key priorities for us by engaging youth in making great public spaces while raising awareness of important issues like climate change,” said Paul Damaso, Director, Arts & Culture. “We’re excited to work with SHEEEP, and our local youth artists, on this terrific project.”

It is anticipated that the artwork will be on display in the Malton Greenway in spring 2022.

To apply for the youth photography and videography positions, visit the submissions page and to learn more about this collaboration, visit sheeep.studio/Mobilizer-3-0.

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Media Contact:

City of Mississauga Media Relations
media@mississauga.ca
905-615-3200, ext. 5232
TTY: 905-896-5151

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