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Donald Trump's political organization builds war chest topping $100 million – CNN

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Trump’s fundraising haul speaks to his continued ability to raise money from small-dollar donors online, as he trumpets baseless claims that election fraud led to his loss last year.
Trump’s team said 3.2 million contributions flowed into the former President’s political committees during the first six months of the year.
In a statement, Trump once again complained of a “stolen” election and cited the donations as a sign that millions of Americans “share my outrage and want me to continue to fight for the truth.”
Trump’s fundraising apparatus includes two political action committees: Save America, a leadership PAC, and the Make America Great Again PAC, along with a separate joint fundraising committee.
Most of Trump’s cash reserves are stockpiled in his Save America leadership PAC, with $90 million remaining in its accounts as of June 30, new filings show — giving the Republican a large sum to unleash as his party seeks to seize control of the House and Senate in next year’s midterm elections. Trump also has hinted at seeking the White House again in 2024, and the new numbers show he remains the GOP’s dominant fundraising figure, despite losing the election and access to social media platforms.
In announcing his fundraising totals, which were first reported by Politico, on Saturday, Trump’s team said his committees had raised nearly $82 million in the first six months of the year, but that total also included funds collected in 2020 that were transferred into his account this year.
Trump spokesman Jason Miller on Sunday said the transfers were included because they amounted to “all new revenues to Save America for this period.”
Save America is the former President’s primary fundraising and public relations vehicle, and he uses it to issue statements endorsing his favored candidates and denouncing those he opposes. But the PAC had not contributed to any congressional candidates during the first six months of the year, according to its filings with the Federal Election Commission. Miller told CNN that checks began going out to endorsed candidates in July, after the period covered by the new filings.
Leadership PACs such as Save America have a cap on donations, but federal rules impose few restrictions on how their contributions can be spent. And during the first six months of the year, the PAC spent about $68,000 for lodging and meals at the Trump Hotel Collection, according to records.
Trump has also endorsed a super PAC, Make America Great Again Action. The super PAC’s filing Saturday night shows it took in a little more than $5 million as of June 30. Individual donors include Don Ahern, a Nevada businessman who contributed $1 million, former Georgia Sen. Kelly Loeffler at $250,000 and MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell at $100,000. Lindell has been on a mission to advance claims that widespread fraud contributed to Trump’s defeat.
The super PAC recently has begun spending to boost Trump-favored candidates — pumping $100,000 into an unsuccessful attempt in July to help elect Texas Republican Susan Wright in a special runoff for a US House seat. Wright lost to fellow Republican Jake Ellzey.
Another GOP primary on Tuesday — this time for a US House seat from Ohio — will offer the latest test of Trump’s ability to sway voters. Make America Great Again Action has spent more than $400,000 so far to promote Trump’s choice, coal lobbyist Mike Carey, in the Columbus-area special election.
This story has been updated with additional information.
CORRECTION: An earlier version of this story incorrectly stated the amount of contributions to Trump’s political committees. It is 3.2 million contributions.

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Emily Tracy: Redistricting has not separated itself from partisan politics – Canon City Daily Record

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Emily Tracy
Special to the Daily Record

I have homes in two communities – Cañon City and Breckenridge – and vote in Fremont County. I have lived in rural Colorado since 1977. Since 2002, I have run for office in a total of 13 rural counties. I am an uncontested candidate for the City Council of Cañon City in the November election.

I have followed the work of the Congressional Redistricting Commission for months, submitting comments and testifying before the Commission several times. I am a supporter of the southern Congressional District concept. I submitted a map in July to the Commission outlining a possible southern district. I now support the amended Headwaters map submitted by Commissioner Tafoya at the September 20 Congressional Redistricting Commission meeting.

A southern Congressional district meets southern and central Colorado community of interest needs. It reflects the cultural history, the watersheds, public lands, commercial and outdoor recreation connections, and transportation corridors of the area.

I am impressed with the September 20 Tafoya map. It appears that great care was taken to not only reflect communities of interest but to also address the other Constitutional priorities including adhering to provisions of the 1965 Voting Rights Act, achieving district compactness plus equal population in each district. In addition, the Tafoya map appears to increase the number of competitive districts as required by Section 44.3 of Article V of the Colorado Constitution.

The three substantially rural districts the Tafoya map proposes truly reflect different concentrations of rural interests. There is no single “rural Colorado,” but instead there are multiple rural interests which concentrate geographically in this proposed map: (1) The energy, public lands, and agricultural interests of northwest Colorado; (2) The agricultural, tourism, cultural, and public lands interests of southern Colorado; and (3) the agricultural and non-public lands (mostly) interests of northeast Colorado.

I know that the Congressional Commission has struggled with the process, and unfortunately seems now to be suffering from not clearly determining early on how to measure Constitutional and Commission priorities. As stated in a recent Colorado Sun article, “Legislative attorney Jeremiah Barry noted several times at a [recent] meeting . . . that the commission hasn’t given nonpartisan staff direction on complying with constitutional-redistricting provisions, including where to set the bar for political competitiveness. ‘We still have no direction,’ he said.”

The clock is now running out, so the Commission probably does need to play out its process without going back to correct early errors and omissions. Of course, maps themselves convey implicit priorities so the discussion now centers around multiple divergent maps. The Second Staff Plan map conveys certain priorities, and the Tafoya September 20 map conveys others.

My concern is that the Commission’s majority support (confirmed by a 11-1 Commission vote on Sept. 20) for a western slope/eastern plains configuration suggests to me that partisan voices are being heard in rural Colorado more than community of interest voices. There are rural organizations weighing in heavily on this process who purport to be the voice(s) of rural Colorado. They do not fully represent rural Colorado. Instead, they represent rural Republicans.

If you have followed redistricting at all you know that our new process in Colorado has in no way separated itself from partisan politics. Instead, those politics have played out on the Congressional Commission in disguise, with Commissioners attacking each other instead of focusing on achieving the best possible map for the state. I hope that we ultimately have a good map that serves the state well for the next 10 years, but it is not common for a botched process to have a good outcome.

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Politics This Morning: Final pieces of 2021 vote puzzle expected today – The Hill Times

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‘These are big shoes,’ Yasir Naqvi said of previous MPs who represented Ottawa Centre, Ont.
As of press deadline on Sept. 21, the Liberals had won or were leading in 156 ridings, the Conservatives 121, the Bloc Québécois 32, the NDP 27, and the Green Party in two.
Difficulties with voting captured the attention of Canadians on Twitter, as many complained of long lines, being turned away at polls and issues with Elections Canada’s website.

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Politics Briefing: Meet the new Parliament, same as the old Parliament – The Globe and Mail

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Hello,

With remarkable precision, Canadian voters are sending MPs back to Ottawa in virtually identical numbers to the party standings in August when Prime Minister Justin Trudeau triggered a snap federal election campaign.

Mr. Trudeau’s Liberals were re-elected Monday for a third time and a second consecutive minority government.

As of Tuesday morning, the Liberals were leading or elected in 158 seats, followed by 119 seats for the Conservatives, 34 for the Bloc Québécois, 25 for the NDP and two for the Greens. The People’s Party of Canada did not win any seats and PPC leader Maxime Bernier finished a distant second to the Conservatives in the Quebec riding of Beauce.

The Liberal gain of one will likely change as the 158 seats includes Kevin Vuong in Spadina–Fort York, who currently has a narrow lead over the NDP candidate. The Liberals disassociated themselves from him late in the campaign after a dropped sexual assault charge was revealed. Should Mr. Vuong win, he will likely sit as an independent, but the Liberal Party did not immediately comment on the situation when asked Tuesday morning.

The most dramatic statistics in Monday’s results are the projected seat changes compared to party standings in the House of Commons before the election. As of Tuesday morning, the Liberals are up one seat (including Mr. Vuong), the Conservatives are down two, the Bloc is up two, the NDP is up one and the Greens are down one.

Those statistics do mask the fact that parties saw some incumbents defeated, but made up for that with gains elsewhere.

For instance, two Liberal cabinet ministers were defeated: Fisheries Minister Bernadette Jordan lost to the Conservatives in the Nova Scotia riding of South Shore-St. Margarets, and Women and Gender Equality Minister Maryam Monsef lost to the Conservatives in Peterborough-Kawartha.

Yet the Liberals may have made two notable gains in Alberta, where it had been shut out entirely in 2019. Liberal candidate George Chahal won the riding of Calgary Skyview, while Liberal Randy Boissonnault currently has a very narrow lead in Edmonton Centre.

Given the need for regional representation, at least one of the two Liberals from Alberta would be promoted to cabinet. This would create challenges, however, for Mr. Trudeau’s efforts to have a gender-balanced cabinet.

Unlike past elections, it will take a few more days until final results are known. Elections Canada received more than one million mail-in ballots this year, which is far higher than normal. The option was promoted as an alternative for Canadians who did not wish to vote in person because of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Elections Canada spokesperson Matthew McKenna said the counting of those mail-in ballots will begin Tuesday.

“We expect the vast majority to be counted and posted by tomorrow (Wednesday), but there may be further delays in some ridings,” he said in an e-mail.

This is the daily Politics Briefing newsletter, written by Ian Bailey. Filling in today is Bill Curry. It is available exclusively to our digital subscribers. If you’re reading this on the web, subscribers can sign up for the Politics newsletter and more than 20 others on our newsletter signup page. Have any feedback? Let us know what you think.

TODAY’S HEADLINES

Canada federal election results: Justin Trudeau’s Liberals win third consecutive election, fall short of a majority: Justin Trudeau’s Liberals won a third straight election on Monday, but fell short of the majority they sought in the snap vote and will return to government with what will effectively be a status quo Parliament.

The Liberal victory left Erin O’Toole’s leadership of the Conservative Party in jeopardy. The Tory leader rose to the helm of the party last year promising to deliver in seat-rich Ontario but he struggled in the campaign with questions on how he would handle the pandemic and wavered on key platform pledges.

Justin Trudeau’s Liberals have a minority again. What now? The new(ish) Parliament explained: After Sept. 20′s election, the balance of power in the House of Commons is largely unchanged between the Liberals, Conservatives, Bloc, NDP and Greens. Here’s what the results show and what leaders say they’ll do next.

After failing to secure majority, Trudeau will face questions within his caucus: Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau took a risky political gamble, triggering a snap election during the fourth wave of the pandemic in pursuit of a new majority mandate. He ended winning another minority mandate instead.

Conservative Leader Erin O’Toole’s ideology shift was not enough to surpass Liberals: Conservative Leader Erin O’Toole steered his party back toward the ideological centre of Canadian politics in 2021 and made this shift a key selling point during the five-week election campaign. But it was not enough to win Canada’s 44th general election as Justin Trudeau’s Liberals will form the next government.

Jagmeet Singh still holds balance of power after 2021 federal election but NDP doesn’t make major seat gains: The NDP under leader Jagmeet Singh will be returning to Ottawa with its balance of power position intact, but the party’s hopes of major seat gains came up short.

PRIME MINISTER’S DAY

Justin Trudeau takes a selfie with a supporter at the Jarry Metro station in Montreal on Sept. 21, 2021, after the Liberals won a minority government the day before.

CARLOS OSORIO/Reuters

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau greeted commuters at a subway station in his Montreal riding of Papineau, where he was re-elected Monday. The Liberal Leader is not scheduled to hold a news conference Tuesday.

LEADERS

Conservative Leader Erin O’Toole is scheduled to hold a news conference at 4 p.m. ET in Ottawa.

NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh is scheduled to hold a news conference at 9:30 am PT (12:30 ET) in Vancouver.

Itineraries for Bloc Leader Yves-François Blanchet and Green Party leader Annamie Paul were not immediately available.

OPINION

Gary Mason (The Globe and Mail) on Erin O’Toole and the Conservative Party brace for an ugly war over his shift to the left: “There is little doubt Mr. O’Toole is girding for an internal fight, one that could get very loud and very messy and has the potential to lead to a complete fracture of the conservative movement.”

Robyn Urback (The Globe and Mail) If this election was a test of leadership, all of them failed: “None of the front-running candidates in this election campaign ventured to engage with challenging ideas, or dared step offside of politically advantageous positions. That bodes poorly for whatever faith the public should have in the capacity of the next government, whatever its specific composition might turn out to be, to capably deal with whatever crisis comes next – be it climate change, or an aging population, or another pandemic – just as long as the tough but necessary decisions risk political penalty.”

Andrew Coyne (The Globe and Mail) on A battle between fear and loathing that both sides lost: “Consider: Had the election been held on schedule, two years from now, the pandemic would (please God) have been long over, the mass vaccination program, with its associated mandates, a distant memory. Without the oxygen of this approaching “tyranny,” Maxime Bernier’s campaign might never have got off the ground. But call an election in the fevered atmosphere of a public-health emergency; spend the entire campaign insisting on the very policy, vaccine mandates, you had previously rejected as “divisive”; steer your campaign straight at the PPC, literally and figuratively, and who knows what profitable mayhem you can create?”

Campbell Clark (The Globe and Mail) Trudeau had just enough resilience to return to office, but doubts about his intentions remain: “He looks the same, still, at 49. But six years ago the Justin Trudeau of 2015 was a figure who for many seemed to symbolize good intentions, even for some who weren’t sure about his politics or ability. The 2021 Mr. Trudeau pulled through a campaign in which he had trouble convincing folks he had the right motivations.”

John Ibbitson (The Globe and Mail) Erin O’Toole tried to refashion the Conservative movement and deserves another chance to lead: “Moderate suburban voters will support Conservative government. We know that because most provincial governments are conservative, of one stripe or another. Many would vote Conservative federally as well, if they could trust the party: a Conservative Party of fiscal responsibility and individual freedom; a party that takes pride in our country while recognizing where we have fallen short; a party that supports business but understands the vulnerability of workers, that protects property but cares for the earth. Mr. O’Toole bet big that he could build and sell such a party. It didn’t work this time. But he could still be the next prime minister, perhaps sooner rather than later.”

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