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'Exhausted and scared': Canada's doctors call for help to stop online hate – National | Globalnews.ca – Globalnews.ca

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Dr. Nili Kaplan-Myrth never thought this would be part of the story that is the COVID-19 pandemic in Canada.

The online hate and harassment she and her colleagues have received over the last 20 months has been distressing, and it reached a tipping point for the Ottawa-based family doctor last week.

On Nov. 1, Kaplan-Myrth said she received an emailed letter disguised as a complaint to Ontario’s physicians’ regulator. In it, was a threat. She said the sender threatened to kill her for her work vaccinating her patients and advocating for inoculation.

“When the pandemic first started, we were worried about whether or not we would live because we feared we would get COVID just doing our work,” Kaplan-Myrth told Global News, adding she’s felt pride for getting so many vaccinated throughout the pandemic.

But that “relief then gets sort of crushed by this horrible feeling that there’s somebody out there … sending a letter saying that I should be killed.”

Read more:
Tory MP apologizes for sharing ‘misinformation’ about COVID-19 and vaccines

Kaplan-Myrth is among a number of Canadian doctors facing continuous hate and harassment online, stemming from COVID-19 and vaccine advocacy. Many are calling on governments to increase protection for health-care workers.

Dr. Naheed Dosani, a palliative care physician in Toronto, told Global News he has been the target of racist attacks online. He’s noticed the messages have become more vitriolic as policies, like Ontario’s recent decision to not mandate vaccination for health-care workers, have come into effect. The mandate was something Dosani had been a vocal advocate for.

“I have to say that there is an association with the anti-vaccine movement and the racist comments and hatred that I receive,” he said.

“Being called racial slurs, being told that I need to watch my back … This isn’t fair, because if this happens to any health worker, it means that our entire industry, our entire sector, is at risk.”


Click to play video: 'Canada announces multi-faceted approach to combat online hate speech, crime with Bill C-36'



2:00
Canada announces multi-faceted approach to combat online hate speech, crime with Bill C-36


Canada announces multi-faceted approach to combat online hate speech, crime with Bill C-36 – Jun 23, 2021

In Brighton, Ont., Dr. Michelle Cohen told Global News she has had to change her notification settings on social media to avoid seeing hateful messages.

“I’ve had some very nasty trolling, just repeated comments about, ‘How are you a doctor? I feel so sorry for your patients, you must be doing things that are terrible, you’re a horrible person,’ and there are lot of misogynistic and antisemitic smears, in particular, that are targeted to me personally,” she said.

“And then there are vague threats like, ‘You’re going to be punished.’ (There’s a) misunderstanding of the history around the Nuremberg trials. A lot of threats like, ‘You’re going to be first against the wall when the Nuremberg trials restart,’ and those sorts of vague kind of threats.”

Read more:
Trudeau, Singh want to criminalize protests that block hospitals. But can they?

In Whitehorse, Yukon, pediatrician Dr. Katharine Smart, who is also president of the Canadian Medical Association, told Global News she feels the majority of Canadians still see them as health-care heroes, but the vocal minority is “distressing.”

“I’ve received multiple messages … both on Twitter and Instagram, calling me names, accusing me of harming people, threatening me, and of course, this generally relates to tweets or Instagram posts that promote vaccination,” she said.

“That’s again, unfortunately, what brings that anti-vax movement out – when you’re out there trying to educate the public, trying to provide accurate information, and then these people come out in droves and it can be quite relentless at times and it’s very distressing.”


Click to play video: 'Dr. Bonnie Henry on hearing crowds chant ‘lock her up’ at anti-vaccine passport rally'



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Dr. Bonnie Henry on hearing crowds chant ‘lock her up’ at anti-vaccine passport rally


Dr. Bonnie Henry on hearing crowds chant ‘lock her up’ at anti-vaccine passport rally – Sep 2, 2021

Smart and other doctors are calling on governments to introduce legislation that protects health-care workers from harm.

After his summer re-election, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau told reporters in September that among the priorities for his new minority government is to bring in laws to protect health-care workers from harassment and intimidation through changes to the criminal code.

The promise came after rallies were held outside several Canadian hospitals on Sept. 13 by supporters of a group called Canadian Frontline Nurses, which organized the protests to stand up to the “tyrannical measures and government overreach” of the most recent public health measures including vaccine passports.

Some of the protests attempted to block entry to hospitals, putting both the employees and patients at risk.

Provinces have made promises similar to Trudeau’s — both the Ontario NDP and Liberals introduced bills to create safety zones around institutions such as hospitals to protect them from anti-vaccine harassment, and Nova Scotia recently passed legislation to establish a 50-metre “safe access bubble” around hospitals and other facilities, such as doctors’ offices, where protests won’t be permitted.

Read more:
COVID-19 hospital protests ‘a morale blow’ to Canada’s exhausted health-care workers

Moreover, several officials spoke out against the Sept. 13 demonstrations, including Ontario Premier Doug Ford who called the protesters “selfish, cowardly and reckless” in a tweet the day before.

That same month, British Columbia Premier John Horgan said protesters demonstrating outside hospitals weren’t welcome.

The doctors who spoke to Global News said they appreciate the support and intention from governments to protect health-care workers, but that it’s time for action — now.

“We need clear messaging from governments that any harassment or bullying of health-care professionals or anyone is unacceptable,” Smart said.

“We’ve seen some talk about legislation to make these things illegal, and I think that needs to move forward. We need safe zones around hospitals, but we also need clear legislation saying that online harassment and bullying is not acceptable in this country and it will not be tolerated.”


Click to play video: 'Canadian government needs to take action on online hate, says expert'



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Canadian government needs to take action on online hate, says expert


Canadian government needs to take action on online hate, says expert – Jun 13, 2021

To avoid seeing hateful messages, Kaplan-Myrth says she no longer allows people to comment on her Twitter page unless she follows them.

She also said she’s grateful to her colleagues for the support she’s receiving.

“We’re not going to stop advocating. I’m certainly not going to stop immunizing my patients, I’m not going to be cowering from bullies but I am exhausted and scared and that’s not OK,” she said.

“What I should be feeling is hope because we’ve got the vaccine, we’re going to be able to immunize kids soon, and it’s going to be the next step towards ending this pandemic.”

© 2021 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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Canada bans flights from South Africa and neighbouring countries – Canada Immigration News

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Published on November 27th, 2021 at 03:00am EST

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Sunset over Cape Town in South Africa.

Sunset over Cape Town in South Africa.

The Canadian government announced that it will limit travel to southern Africa, a region which has reported cases of a new COVID-19 variant of concern.

As of November 26, all foreign nationals who have travelled through the seven affected countries in the last 14 days will not be allowed to enter Canada. The affected nations include: South Africa, Namibia, Zimbabwe, Botswana, Lesotho, Eswatini, and Mozambique .

Canadian citizens and permanent residents will be allowed to return home, but they will have to fly home indirectly, passing through a third country where they will also need to take a  molecular COVID-19 test.

Discover if You’re Eligible for Canadian Immigration

Canada’s health minister, Jean-Yves Duclos said people already in Canada who travelled in the region over the past two weeks should get a COVID-19 test and stay in isolation until they receive a negative test result.

Transport Minister Omar Alghabra said the new measures will be in affect until at least Jan. 31, 2022.

The announcement comes after the World Health Organization (WHO) dubbed the new COVID-19 strain, also known as Omicron or B.1.1.529, as a variant of concern. So far, the Omicron variant has been detected in South Africa, Botswana, as well as in Israel, Belgium, and Hong Kong. It has not been found in Canada, according to Chief Public Health Officer, Theresa Tam.

The transport minister encouraged Canadians who are unable to get home due to the restrictions to contact the emergency watch centre.

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Canada needs to make a tough call on boosters as a new variant emerges – CBC.ca

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This is an excerpt from Second Opinion, a weekly roundup of health and medical science news emailed to subscribers every Saturday morning. If you haven’t subscribed yet, you can do that by clicking here.


Despite a growing push to roll out COVID-19 vaccine boosters more widely in Canada, epidemiologists say there is currently no evidence of an urgent need for additional shots in the general population — due to the strong, ongoing protection two doses already provide.

But with the emergence of the potentially more infectious omicron variant, the holidays rapidly approaching and COVID-19 levels remaining elevated in much of the country, should Canada wait for more proof of waning immunity before expanding eligibility of boosters?

Or should we move quickly to offer up additional shots to fend off another potential surge as the U.S., the U.K. and Israel have done?

Some provinces and territories have already expanded access to boosters — including Manitoba, the Northwest Territories and Yukon — while others have taken a more cautious approach by only offering them to certain vulnerable groups and health-care workers.

But the current case for rolling out third shots to most Canadians while much of the world remains unvaccinated and new variants continue to emerge seems weak at best.

“There is currently no evidence of widespread decreasing protection over time against severe disease in the general Canadian population who have been vaccinated,” a spokesperson for the National Advisory Committee on Immunization (NACI) told CBC News. 

“NACI continues to actively review available evidence from Canada and other countries, and if needed, will update advice on booster doses as a preventive measure.”

The current case for rolling out third shots to most Canadians while much of the world remains unvaccinated and new variants continue to emerge seems weak at best. (Ben Nelms/CBC)

‘Don’t want to wait until it’s too late’

Experts are divided over the need to expand access to additional shots to more Canadians — or even to everyone over 18 — and the emergence of the omicron variant will likely only heat up the debate further until we know more about it.

“I understand that mounting pressure to give more and more doses,” said Dr. Danuta Skowronski, epidemiology lead at the British Columbia Centre for Disease Control, whose research prompted Canada’s decision to delay second doses of COVID-19 vaccines

“But I cannot say based on the current evidence that there is a clear and present danger or need or indication for an additional dose for the general population of adults at this time.”

Skowronski said the latest data from B.C. and Quebec, released jointly as a recent preprint study that has yet to be peer reviewed, suggested mRNA vaccines were close to 95 per cent protective against hospitalization and over 80 per cent against any infection.

“Should we be attempting a preemptive strike to fend off a possible surge? Well, that kind of attitude is a slippery slope,” she said.

Rolling out boosters more widely is a “massive population-wide undertaking” that could set a bad precedent for future shots.

“We should only really make decisions ahead of the evidence if there is an urgent need to do so — otherwise we should be cautious in jumping the gun … and on what basis then do we make decisions about whether a fourth, or a fifth, or a sixth dose?”

WATCH | Growng push for Ontario to expand COVID-19 booster shot eligibility:

Calls mount for Ontario to expand COVID-19 booster shot eligibility

6 days ago

There are growing calls for Ontario to expand the eligibility for COVID-19 booster shots to include more people who are immunocompromised. It comes as Sen. Josée Forest-Niesing, who had an autoimmune disease, died shortly after being hospitalized with COVID-19 despite being fully vaccinated. 2:00

New data from Public Health Ontario shows just nine fully vaccinated people under the age of 60 have been admitted to ICU since the vaccine rollout began.

Researchers at the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences (ICES) in Toronto also found most fully vaccinated people in Ontario were still highly protected against both infection and severe COVID-19 eight months after their second dose.

ICES’s vaccine estimates showed that while protection against symptoms dropped to just over 80 per cent — and to more than 70 per cent when including asymptomatic infections — prevention of hospitalizations remained high at more than 90 per cent.

“So the question is, at eight months, is a vaccine effectiveness of 70-something per cent good enough? Or is that going to open the door to disaster?” said Dr. Jeff Kwong, an epidemiologist and senior scientist at ICES.

“We’re kind of in this precarious spot where we’re probably going to need boosters at some point, but whether we need them now is debatable — but you don’t want to wait until it’s too late.”

Canada is sitting on a massive stockpile of vaccines compared to other countries — with close to six million in the national inventory according to PHAC — while over one million doses have reportedly already gone to waste since our rollout began. (Aaron Favila/The Associated Press)

Millions of unused vaccine doses sitting in freezers

Canada is also sitting on a massive stockpile of vaccines compared to other countries — with close to six million in the national inventory according to PHAC — while over one million doses have reportedly already gone to waste since the rollout began.

“Right now, we should be offering boosters to everybody five months out of the second dose,” said Raywat Deonandan, a global health epidemiologist and associate professor at the University of Ottawa.

“There are millions going unused, and we’re at the point where we’re struggling to get that last 20 per cent of people to even accept their first dose. So for the rest of us that have two doses, let’s maximize our immunity.”

Dr. Isaac Bogoch, an infectious diseases physician and member of Ontario’s COVID-19 vaccine task force, says it’s “well past time” to expand booster eligibility to Canadians over the age of 50 who are six months out from their second shot at the very least.

“It’s pretty fair to say that there is some degree of waning immunity against getting the infection, but most of the data we’ve seen demonstrates that two doses still provide significant protection against severe disease,” he said. 

“But there is still value in reducing infection as well — it really can reduce amplification of the virus in the community, and you certainly can prevent some severe disease especially in the older cohort.”

Dr. Isaac Bogoch says it’s ‘well past time’ to expand booster eligibility to Canadians over the age of 50 who are six months out from their second shot at the very least. (Alberta Health Services)

The push for expanding boosters in Canada comes despite the World Health Organization‘s plea to wealthier countries to hit pause on widespread booster shots until at least 2022 in favour of vaccinating more of the unvaccinated world.

The omicron variant emerged in southern Africa, which has some of the lowest vaccination rates globally, highlighting a dire need for more doses on the continent.

But Bogoch says the two approaches don’t need to be mutually exclusive. 

“We can align with the WHO’s request for a moratorium on population-level booster vaccines until 2022 but also simultaneously use the vaccines that we have and act in a data-driven manner by providing third doses to the 50-plus crowd,” he said.

“It was time to do this several weeks ago — if not a month or two ago — because we are headed into fall and winter months, and we know cases are going to predictably rise at this time of year.”

Boosters won’t prevent global threat of variants 

Canada’s COVID-19 reproductive rate has been sitting precariously close to one for months, meaning a surge in cases due to an increase in indoor gatherings during colder weather could lead to exponential growth.

“We are all at the cusp of either growth or the decline in cases — we’re just there,” said Dr. Leyla Asadi, an infectious diseases physician at the University of Alberta in Edmonton.

“And we are kidding ourselves if we think that there isn’t going to be a significant increase in contacts over the holidays. Of course, there will be, and of course, this will mostly be inside because we are living in Canada in the winter.”

Despite the increased risk during the next few months, experts say the emergence of a new variant of concern also further highlights the need to vaccinate people in lower-income countries who have had much less access to vaccines.

“Why do we have a stockpile of vaccines when much of the world does not have access to a first dose?” said Dr. Zain Chagla, an infectious diseases physician at St. Joseph’s Healthcare Hamilton and an associate professor at McMaster University.

“The reality of the situation is Canada doesn’t make vaccines, and so, every dose that shows up on our soil is a dose that was not on someone else’s soil.”

A baby cries as her mother receives the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine in Diepsloot Township near Johannesburg on Oct. 21. (Denis Farrell/The Associated Press)

Canada has committed to donating 73 million more COVID-19 vaccines to the developing world, with four million doses sent to the WHO’s COVAX program earlier this month, but Chagla says giving low-risk Canadians another dose undermines that progress.

Alyson Kelvin, an assistant professor at Dalhousie University in Halifax and a virologist at the Canadian Center for Vaccinology and the Vaccine and Infectious Disease Organization in Saskatoon, says that given the global threat of variants, it would be better for Canadians to wait for a variant-specific booster.

A booster tailored to the delta, omicron or other variants that emerge in the future would likely be more useful than a third shot of a vaccine aimed at the original Wuhan strain of the coronavirus.

“We should take some of the vaccines that might come in for boosters and donate those so that we’re dividing them up more evenly and not taking everything for Canada,” she said.

“That would be a much better strategy than bringing vaccines in for boosters, when it’s not clear if it’s going to help our current pandemic situation.”

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As an alarming new COVID-19 variant emerges, Canada moves to limit travel from southern Africa – CBC.ca

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Health Minister Jean-Yves Duclos announced today that Canada will limit travel from seven countries in southern Africa, a region that has reported cases of a new — and possibly more infectious — coronavirus variant.

Starting today, all foreign nationals who have travelled through South Africa, Namibia, Zimbabwe, Botswana, Lesotho, Eswatini or Mozambique in the last 14 days will be barred from entering Canada.

Global Affairs Canada will also issue an advisory today warning against all travel to the region for the foreseeable future, Duclos said.

Canadian citizens and permanent residents will be allowed to return home — but they’ll face a new requirement that could make travel awkward.

Because there are no direct flights between the region and Canada, most travellers transit through airports in Europe, the Middle East and the U.S.

Starting today, travellers must get a molecular test in the country they connect through on their way to Canada.

Then, after landing in Canada, inbound travellers must also get an arrival test and wait for the results of that test at a designated hotel. If the test is negative, those returning travellers would be released to quarantine for a mandatory 14 days at home. They also would be required to go through a so-called “day eight” test on the eighth day of quarantine.

WATCH: Canada announces measures to counter new coronavirus variant of concern

Canada announces measures to counter new coronavirus variant of concern

8 hours ago

Health Minister Jean-Yves Duclos announced several measures to counter the newest coronavirus variant of concern named omicron, including a ban on all flights from seven countries in southern Africa. 2:14

And anyone who has arrived in Canada from southern Africa in the last 14 days must immediately get a COVID-19 test — even if they are asymptomatic. They’re required to go home and quarantine while they wait for those results.

As nations close their airspace to flights from southern Africa, it may become more difficult to travellers leaving the region to transit through other countries.

Asked if the government would help those who may become stranded, Transport Minister Omar Alghabra said Canadians have been warned about the risk of travelling during a global pandemic for nearly two years.

“We’ve been asking them to pay close attention to travel measures, to border restrictions,” he said. “But if any individual, any Canadian citizen, is having a hard time figuring out how to get back home, I encourage them to call the emergency watch centre to speak with an official. They will try and work with them to figure out how to get them home safely.”

WATCH: Minister encourages Canadians stranded by travel restrictions on southern Africa to call for help

Transport minister encourages Canadians stranded by travel restrictions on southern Africa to call for help

8 hours ago

Minister of Transport Omar Alghabra responds to a question from the CBC’s Tom Parry about getting Canadians home from southern Africa safely after the government imposed new travel restrictions in response to a new COVID-19 variant. 2:21

Dr. Theresa Tam, Canada’s chief public health officer, said the new strain — dubbed the “omicron” variant by the World Health Organization (WHO) — has not yet been reported in Canada.

She said the omicron variant is notable because it has a large number of mutations, which may affect its transmissibility and the effect of COVID-19 vaccines.

“We’re concerned about this new variant and closely monitoring the evolving situation,” Tam told a briefing with reporters. “The challenges persist with this virus.”

Tam said the new travel requirements are a prudent effort to keep the variant out, but it’s likely cases of the omicron variant will emerge in Canada in the coming days.

“It is very difficult to keep a virus like this out entirely,” she said.

Tam said vaccines are “still fundamentally the most important layer of protection” and unvaccinated Canadians should get their shots. Research is underway now to determine the efficacy of the current batch of vaccines against omicron, she said.

It’s not unusual for a virus to mutate over time. The WHO brands a particular strain a variant of concern (VOC) when that mutation might affect factors like transmissibility, virulence or the effectiveness of vaccines.

While many questions remain, the U.K. Health Security Agency warned today that the new variant is the “most complex” and the “most worrying we’ve seen.”

In a media statement, the WHO said today the number of cases of this variant, initially named B.1.1.529, appeared to be increasing in almost all of South Africa’s provinces.

While COVID-19 case counts fell dramatically in that country in September and October after a delta-driven third wave, infections have since “increased steeply, coinciding with the detection of B.1.1.529 variant,” the WHO said.

“This variant has a large number of mutations, some of which are concerning. Preliminary evidence suggests an increased risk of reinfection with this variant, as compared to other VOCs.”

Countries around the world already have restricted travel from some areas of the African continent in an effort to keep the newly identified coronavirus variant from crossing their borders.

Britain, Israel and Singapore, among others, have restricted travel from South Africa and some neighbouring countries. European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen is proposing member states pull the “emergency brake” on travel from some countries in Africa to limit the spread of the variant.

In question period Friday, Conservative MP Luc Berthold, the party’s health critic, called for swift action to prevent the new variant from derailing Canada’s progress in the fight against COVID-19.

“Canadians are worried,” Berthold said. “The Liberal government has been slow, slow to warn Canadians, slow to close the borders, slow to provide vaccines. There’s still time to protect Canadians who are fed up with lockdowns.”

Associate Health Minister Carolyn Bennett said pre-departure PCR testing is in place and those tests “are capable of detecting this variant.”

“The COVID-19 situation around the world continues to be volatile and unpredictable and we continue to monitor the situation very closely,” she said.

WATCH | Associate Health Minister Carolyn Bennett discusses new measures on CBC’s Power & Politics

Minister urges Canadians to ‘continue to be vigilant’, as new COVID-19 variant emerges in South Africa

6 hours ago

“I’ve cancelled my Christmas party…I do think Canadians need to continue to be vigilant.” Associate Health Minister @Carolyn_Bennett on whether Canadians should cancel their holiday plans, as a new COVID-19 variant is emerging in South Africa. 11:07

Alghabra said the government wouldn’t take lessons from the Conservatives on pandemic management when the party’s leader, Erin O’Toole, refuses to require that all Conservative MPs get a COVID-19 vaccine.

Just last week, Alghabra said, the Conservatives were also calling for an end to pre-departure PCR testing and fewer travel restrictions.

“Forgive me for not taking advice from the Conservative Party,” he said.

Anthony Fauci, the top U.S. infectious-disease official, said banning flights to the United States from southern Africa is a “possibility” but that a decision has not been made yet.

“There is always the possibility of doing what the U.K. has done, namely block travel from South Africa and related countries,” Fauci said Friday morning in an interview on CNN.

“That’s certainly something you think about and get prepared to do … But you want to make sure there’s a basis for doing that.”

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