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Facebook Introduces Robo-Dog That Is Nearly Impossible To Stop – Tech Gaming Report

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Researchers from Facebook and US universities have unveiled a robotic dog that works on a machine learning model and is ready for ‘mishaps’ such as impassable surfaces, variable heights, and heavy weight.

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Unless you’ve been living under a rock for the past few years, you’ve likely seen at least one video of the Boston Dynamics Robo-Dog Spot now owned by Hyundai Corporation. If you are also a devoted geek reader You saw one of these in action right here in Israel, with Israeli technology.. Now Facebook robotics and artificial intelligence researchers are taking and updating the concept with their very own robotic dog that knows how to deal with real-world conditions and is armed with some particularly advanced models.

The AI ​​that will improve robots?

A team of researchers from Facebook’s AI division and the American universities of Berkeley and Carnegie Mellon have introduced a new artificial intelligence model called Rapid Motor Adaption (or RMA for short) designed to improve the mobility of robots. The model allows robots to make corrections to their movement in real time, under different conditions and under different circumstances.

The model created by the research teams for the robots is based on the use of two very familiar techniques from the world of AI and machine learning: the first is reinforcement learning (or RL) and the second is supervised learning. Using these techniques, the researchers created a situation in which the robot becomes accustomed to changes in real time, such as the surfaces on which it walks or carries weight without warning, without the help of visual feedback. In other words, while Spot the Dog scans its surroundings with computer vision, Facebook’s bot is ready for failure and quickly adapts to the UAV.

The researchers behind the new model point out that today robots are either manually programmed according to the environment in which they are designed to operate, or they are partially programmed manually, using learning techniques to learn to navigate the environment. On the contrary, RMA, according to the researchers, is the first model based solely on learning techniques that allows robots to adapt to different environments from scratch by moving in space and interacting with the environment.

According to the researchers, the robots they ran the RMA on were able to achieve more successful results than competing systems when it comes to walking on different surfaces, including different gradients and obstacles, and carrying different weights on them as they walk. “It is even more difficult than sophisticated manual programming, because it is difficult or impossible to pre-program a robot to get used to the full range of environments in the world,” the researchers wrote.

Prepare the robot for real life

Investigators who signed Article On the subject of the model developed together with Facebook, they state that no matter how good the teams that develop robots are, their full or partial programming will always be successful under laboratory conditions, but will not hold up in real life testing. According to them, only the use of a model like RMA could give robots the ability to move in space while loading different weights, without the need to repair their software each time; Or the ability to keep walking properly even if they have suffered some damage to one of their “feet” and the ability to adapt to countless changes that can occur in real time.

To address the various challenges of space movement and real-time repairs, RMA relies on two subsystems. The first is a basic policy created by RL-based learning simulations: the researchers stored a lot of information about the different environments (such as the amount of friction in each environment or the different weights thrown at the robot) and from this information they learned to anticipate which settings must do.





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However, in real time it is impossible to know exactly which surfaces the robot will encounter, and this is where the second subsystem comes into play: the adaptation module. The basic policy is the one that drives the robot in real time and is designed to operate quickly, otherwise it will freeze in place or crash. Next to it, the adaptation module runs in the background, which takes the information collected from the robot’s sensors and makes the necessary corrections according to this information. The two subsystems operate asynchronously, which also allows for a smaller computational module needed to run RMA, so that in practice there is less weight on the robot.

Using all of these abilities, crews were able to march their RMA-based robot into environments such as sand, mud, walking paths, high meadows, and even a pile of dirt when only one of the experiments failed the mission. Among other things, the robot managed 70% of attempts to go down high stairs, which were found to walk where it walked, and 80% of attempts to walk on piles of gravel and concrete. The robot was also able to walk at 12 kilograms, the same weight as its entire body weight. Additionally, the Robo-Dog was able to steadily walk on an oiled surface which caused the dog without the model to instantly slip.

The complete study is Here.

Oshri alexelsi

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Warming Planet Means 83 Million Face Death From Heat This Century – Financial Post

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(Bloomberg) — A population equivalent to that of Germany — 83 million people — could be killed this century because of rising temperatures caused by greenhouse-gas emissions, according to a new study that might influence how markets price carbon pollution.

The research from Columbia University’s Earth Institute introduces a new metric to help companies and governments assess damages wrought by climate change. Accounting for the “mortality cost of carbon” could give polluters new reasons to clean up by dramatically raising the cost of emissions.

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“Based on the decisions made by individuals, businesses or governments, this tells you how many lives will be lost or saved,” said Columbia’s Daniel Bressler, whose research was published Thursday in the journal Nature Communications. “It quantifies the mortality impact of those decisions” by reducing questions down “to a more personal, understandable level.”

Read more: How Biden Is Putting a Number on Carbon’s True Cost: QuickTake 

Adapting models developed by Yale climate economist and Nobel Prize winner William Nordhaus, Bressler calculated the number of direct heat deaths that will be caused by current global-warming trajectories. His calculations don’t include the number of people who might die from rising seas, superstorms, crop failures or changing disease patterns affected by atmospheric warming. That means that the estimated deaths — which approximates the number of people killed in World War 2 — could still be a “vast underestimate,” Bressler said.

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Every 4,434 tons of carbon spewed in 2020 into the Earth’s atmosphere will kill one person this century, according to the peer-reviewed calculations that see the planet warming 4.1 degrees Celsius by 2100. So far the planet has warmed about 1.1 degrees Celsius, compared to pre-industrial times. 

The volume of pollution emitted over the lifetime of three average U.S. residents is estimated to contribute to the death of another person. Bressler said the highest mortality rates can be expected in Earth’s hottest and poorest regions in Africa, the Middle East and South Asia.

Read more: Life and Death in Our Hot Future Will be Shaped by Today’s Income Inequality

The new metric could significantly affect how economies calculate the so-called social cost of carbon, which U.S. President Joe Biden’s administration set at $51 a ton in February. That price on pollution, which complements carbon markets like the European Union’s Emissions Trading System, helps governments set policy by accounting for future damages. But the scale revealed by Bressler’s research suggests the social cost of carbon should be significantly higher, at about $258 a ton, if the world’s economies want to reduce deaths caused by global warming.

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A higher cost on carbon pollution could immediately induce larger emission cuts, which in turn could save lives. Capping global average temperature increase to 2.4 degrees Celsius by the end of the century, compared with modest emissions reductions that would warm the planet 3.4 degrees Celsius, could save 74 million people from dying of heat.

“People shouldn’t take their per-person mortality emissions too personally,” said Bressler. Governments need to mobilize “large-scale policies such as carbon pricing, cap and trade and investments in low carbon technologies and energy storage.”

©2021 Bloomberg L.P.

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Elon Musk's SpaceX saved NASA $500 million – Quartz

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The rocket billionaire discourse, heady as it is, can distract from the facts. Here’s one: NASA saved at least $548 million, and perhaps more, thanks to just one contract with Elon Musk’s SpaceX.

Last week, the US space agency tapped the company’s Falcon Heavy rocket to launch a space probe to one of Jupiter’s moons, Europa, in 2024. The much-awaited Europa Clipper mission will fly by and assess the evidence of water—and extra-terrestrial life—on the astronomical body. The mission was driven through Congress thanks in large part to the support of one former representative, John Culberson, a Texas Republican who navigated it through the sea of veto points and competing priorities that often stands between scientific hopes and their realization.

One way the mission avoided political pitfalls was a linkage with Boeing’s Space Launch System (SLS) rocket, a huge space vehicle designed to return humans to the moon or Mars. The rocket had just one problem: It was hastily assembled from the remains of a canceled NASA program, and there were no concrete plans for it. A decade ago, the folks behind each project joined forces to justify one another’s work. “Once built, SLS would be a rocket with nowhere to fly,” David W. Brown writes in The Mission, his account of the project. “Europa was a somewhere.”

The delayed SLS has yet to fly. Its first mission is expected around the end of this year. But since the SLS became central to the Trump administration’s Artemis program to return to the moon, NASA auditors have pointed out, in addition to the massive cost, that there would not be enough SLS rockets for both the moon and Europa missions.

In 2019, NASA’s inspector general sounded out the possibilities (pdf), and wasn’t bullish on any of them, particularly on price: Even accounting for the fact that the SLS could get the probe to Jupiter faster (saving money spent on the program back home), the system would cost about $726 million. Two other rockets available for purchase, the United Launch Alliance’s Delta IV and the Falcon Heavy, were forecast to cost $450 million each.

The Europa Clipper wound up with a cheaper ride

The deal NASA eventually made with SpaceX for the Falcon Heavy, however, will cost just $178 million. The drop in cost is directly traceable to SpaceX’s approach to designing reusable rockets, and to the partnership NASA struck with Musk’s space firm in its early days.

Think about that: In just two years, the price of launching a space probe fell by 75%; it’s less than the cost of the rocket that launched the latest Mars rover last year. This will enable NASA to direct more resources to other science programs (as well as getting the SLS off the ground).

“Having that launch capability at that price point just saves so much, particularly for the science part of NASA that just does not have the mega-budgets that human spaceflight does,” says Casey Dreier, a space policy analyst at the Planetary Society. “To see other future missions by NASA able to leverage the lift capability of the Heavy at that price point opens up a significant amount of space access.”

The Falcon Heavy, which didn’t even exist when the Europa mission was being planned, has only flown three times. But it will launch at least five more times, including for a NASA mission to an asteroid called Psyche, before the Europa mission is expected to get underway in late 2024.

This is a transformative period for the maturing space industry, as billionaire funders and new business models increase the capacity of private actors. The egos involved may take up a lot of oxygen, but the goals of the commercial space business are not mutually exclusive with NASA’s scientific pursuits; quite the opposite, in fact: They’re enabling more science than before.

A version of this story originally appeared in Quartz’s Space Business newsletter.

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International Space Station Gets Unplanned Shove as Russian Module Arrives – BNN

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(Bloomberg) — The International Space Station got an unplanned push when the thrusters on a new Russian module turned on unexpectedly after docking.

The movements caused a brief loss of attitude control but the space station suffered no damage and none of the seven crew members was injured, ISS flight controllers in Houston said on NASA TV. The U.S National Aeronautics and Space Administration is planning a news conference later Thursday to discuss the incident. 

The mishap occurred a day before Boeing Co. was scheduled to launch its Starliner capsule on a test flight to the orbiting lab as part of NASA’s Commercial Crew Program. The Boeing mission is a do-over of a botched test from December 2019 and the Starliner won’t be carrying a crew on the flight, which is scheduled to blast off from Florida at 2:53 p.m. Eastern time on Friday.

NASA is “monitoring the impact to tomorrow’s launch of the Boeing Starliner spacecraft,” according to a statement by the space agency.

Russian cosmonauts had opened the new Nauka module’s hatch and were incorporating its computers with the existing Zvedza service module when the newly arrived spacecraft began firing at 12:45 p.m. Eastern. The thruster firings changed the station’s attitude by 45 degrees, NASA said. 

A Russian Progress cargo craft attached to the station began firing its own thrusters to counteract the effect from the Nauka module. Roscosmos flight controllers planned to reconfigure the Nauka thrusters to prevent a recurrence, NASA said. The U.S. space agency and Russia are investigating why the unplanned thrusting occurred. 

(Updates with NASA comment in fourth paragraph. A previous version of this story corrected the time in the fifth paragraph.)

©2021 Bloomberg L.P.

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