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Fantastic Four's New Origin Could Be Coming, Thanks To NASA – Screen Rant

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The Fantastic Four could use a real-life event to create a modern origin. On November 15th, 2020, the long-awaited launch of NASA’s SpaceX Crew Dragon space probe happened. The project saw four selected astronauts, Michael Hopkins, Victor Glover, Shannon Walker, and Soichi Noguchi sent into space for the purpose of scientific research on the International Space Station, which ironically has a great deal in common with the origin of Marvel‘s ‘First Family,’ the Fantastic Four. While the chances of the four astronauts returning to Earth (at the conclusion of their six-month scientific journey) with superpowers are slim, SpaceX’s ambitious mission potentially lays the groundwork for Marvel’s famous astronauts in the Marvel Cinematic Universe.

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This year’s successful mission of launching the Crew Dragon has been in the making for over a decade. NASA and Elon Musk’s development of SpaceX was situated in the hopes of advancing human space travel for decades to come – A mission which happens to be the long-term goal of Fantastic Four leader Reed Richards a.k.a. Mr. Fantastic. Reed attempted to revolutionize space travel with his personally designed rocket in 1961’s Fantastic Four #1. Due to the period in which they were published, the original Fantastic Four of the comics serve as a product of the 1960s’ space race. The United States and their rival, Russia’s Soviet Union, were on a collision course to see who would reach the stars first, with the U.S. ultimately declared the victor when astronauts Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin became the first human beings to land on the moon. However, today the climate and the MCU have both shifted to a point where the world is not focused on reaching the moon so much as pushing the envelope in terms of what is possible.

Related: The Fantastic Four’s FIFTH Member is Reborn in New Fan Art

With Marvel’s cinematic interpretation of Earth frequently threatened by hostile alien visitors perhaps more than any other threat, the precedent for getting onto an evening playing field with the larger cosmic society is coming to a head. It would be a natural progression of the universe and characters established that the U.S. government as well as other governments of the world would begin to send their own well-qualified astronauts into space. If the next Thanos is on the horizon, there’s a good bet the powers that be would want to know all they can before any colossal cosmic beings reach home.

Fantastic Four Origin Mission Planet

While NASA does exist in the MCU, it would be even more intuitive if the Fantastic Four were astronauts for the newly christened space defense agency S.W.O.R.D. (Sentient World Observation and Response Division), set to officially make its debut in the upcoming Wanda Vision television series. This allows for the team to be naturally ingrained into the larger world prior to their fateful mission into outer space, giving the quasi dated origin a much-needed update.

The Avengers are superheroes born and bred, but the Fantastic Four have always been more science-oriented and focused on exploration from the start. Mr. Fantastic, Invisible Woman, The Thing, and The Human Torch are not only dealing with aliens that want to destroy the planet, but simultaneously working on methods to bridge the gap between Earth and the larger cosmos, through space travel, alternate dimensions, and even time hopping. If there are heroes who can change the future of the human race through a flight to space, it is the Fantastic Four.

Next: Marvel Theory: Mr. Fantastic Will Become The X-Men’s Worst Enemy

Source: CNN.com, SpaceX.com

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Robert Pattinson as Batman and Iron Man

Iron Man’s Smartest Idea is One Batman Has Never Thought Of

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VIDEO: Massive fireball lights up the sky in parts of Canada and the US – KamloopsBCNow

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Some people in parts of Canada and the United States witnessed a massive fireball streak through the sky yesterday.

Witnesses reported seeing a flash of light, and the moment was also caught on camera.

Footage from the EarthCam at the CN Tower in Toronto shows the flash of light and points out the meteor-like object soar through the sky.

The Geminid meteor shower is taking place this month, and promises to be one of the most active meteor showers of the year.

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Nasa sets prices for Moon dust – Bangkok Post

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Nasa has awarded contracts to four companies to collect lunar samples.

WASHINGTON: The US space agency Nasa awarded contracts to four companies on Thursday to collect lunar samples for US$1 to $15,000, rock-bottom prices that are intended to set a precedent for future exploitation of space resources by the private sector.

“I think it’s kind of amazing that we can buy lunar regolith from four companies for a total of $25,001,” said Phil McAlister, director of Nasa’s Commercial Spaceflight Division.

The contracts are with Lunar Outpost of Golden, Colorado for $1; ispace Japan of Tokyo for $5,000; ispace Europe of Luxembourg for $5,000; and Masten Space Systems of Mojave, California for $15,000.

The companies plan to carry out the collection during already scheduled unmanned missions to the Moon in 2022 and 2023.

The firms are to collect a small amount of lunar soil known as regolith from the Moon and to provide imagery to NASA of the collection and the collected material.

Ownership of the lunar soil will then be transferred to NASA and it will become the “sole property of NASA for the agency’s use under the Artemis program.”

Under the Artemis program, Nasa plans to land a man and a woman on the Moon by 2024 and lay the groundwork for sustainable exploration and an eventual mission to Mars.

“The precedent is a very important part of what we’re doing today,” said Mike Gold, NASA’s acting associate administrator for international and interagency relations.

“We think it’s very important to establish the precedent that the private sector entities can extract, can take these resources but Nasa can purchase and utilize them to fuel not only NASA’s activities, but a whole new dynamic era of public and private development and exploration on the Moon,” Gold said.

“We must learn to generate our own water, air and even fuel,” he said. “Living off the land will enable ambitious exploration activities that will result in awe inspiring science and unprecedented discoveries.”

Any lessons learned on the Moon would be crucial to an eventual mission to Mars.

“Human mission to Mars will be even more demanding and challenging than our lunar operations, which is why it’s so critical to learn from our experiences on the Moon and apply those lessons to Mars,” Gold said.

“We want to demonstrate explicitly that you can extract, you can utilize resources, and that we will be conducting those activities in full compliance with the Outer Space Treaty,” he said. “That’s the precedent that’s important. It’s important for America to lead, not just in technology, but in policy.”

The United States is seeking to establish a precedent because there is currently no international consensus on property rights in space and China and Russia have not reached an understanding with the United States on the subject.

The 1967 Outer Space Treaty is vague but it deems outer space to be “not subject to national appropriation by claim of sovereignty, by means of use or occupation, or by any other means.”

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Chinese moon mission begins return to earth with lunar rocks – Global News

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A Chinese spacecraft lifted off from the moon Thursday night with a load of lunar rocks, the first stage of its return to Earth, the government space agency reported.

Chang’e 5, the third Chinese spacecraft to land on the moon and the first to take off from it again, is the latest in a series of increasingly ambitious missions for Beijing’s space program, which also has an orbiter and rover headed to Mars.

Read more:
Chinese robot probe sent to retrieve lunar rocks lands on the moon, officials say

The Chang’e 5 touched down Tuesday on the Sea of Storms on the moon’s near side. Its mission: collect about two kilograms (four pounds) of lunar rocks and bring them back to Earth, the first return of samples since Soviet spacecraft did so in the 1970s. Earlier, the U.S. Apollo astronauts brought back hundreds of pounds of moon rocks.

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The landing site is near a formation called the Mons Rumker and may contain rocks billions of years younger than those retrieved earlier.

The ascent vehicle lifted off from the moon shortly after 11 p.m. Beijing time Thursday (1500 GMT) and was due to rendezvous with a return vehicle in lunar orbit, then transfer the samples to a capsule, according to the China National Space Administration. The moon rocks and debris were sealed inside a special canister to avoid contamination.

It wasn’t clear when the linkup would occur. After the transfer, the ascent module would be ejected and the capsule would remain in lunar orbit for about a week, awaiting the optimal time to make the trip back to Earth.

Chinese officials have said the capsule with the samples is due to land on Earth around the middle of the month. Touchdown is planned for the grasslands of Inner Mongolia, where China’s astronauts have made their return in Shenzhou spacecraft.

Chang’e 5’s lander, which remained on the moon, was capable of scooping samples from the surface and drilling two metres (about six feet).

While retrieving samples was its main task, the lander also was equipped to extensively photograph the area, map conditions below the surface with ground penetrating radar and analyze the lunar soil for minerals and water content.

Read more:
China’s lunar rover finds unknown ‘gel-like’ substance on the far side of the moon

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Right before the ascent vehicle lifted off, the lander unfurled what the space administration called the first free-standing Chinese flag on the moon. The agency posted an image — apparently taken from the lander — of the ascend vehicle firing its engines as it took off.

Chang’e 5 has revived talk of China one day sending astronauts to the moon and possibly building a scientific base there, although no timeline has been proposed for such projects.

China launched its first temporary orbiting laboratory in 2011 and a second in 2016. Plans call for a permanent space station after 2022, possibly to be serviced by a reusable space plane.

While China is boosting co-operation with the European Space Agency and others, interactions with NASA are severely limited by U.S. concerns over the secretive nature and close military links of the Chinese program.

© 2020 The Canadian Press

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