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Female Eye Film Festival Celebrates 20 Years June 9-12, 2002

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 Toronto, ON  Returning LIVE, the Female Eye Film Festival (FeFF), founded by Canadian trailblazer Leslie Ann Coles, celebrates its 20th Anniversary June 9 to 12, 2022, at TIFF Bell Lightbox.

FeFF was way ahead of its time at its founding, and the festival’s tagline, “Always Honest, Not Always Pretty,” says it all. It’s an eclectic program of features, documentaries, shorts, and the highly anticipated Late-Night Thrills and Chills – an international program of horror, suspense, and thrillers directed by women – on Friday, June 10, and Saturday, June 11, at 10PM. 

Voted one of the “Top 50 Film Festivals Worth the Entry Fee” by Movie Maker Magazine for a 10th consecutive year (2013–2022), FeFF is a competitive international women’s film festival that provides an exclusive showcase for Canadian and foreign women and gender-diverse directors.

 

FeFF has tackled gender equality and inclusion since its inception. The Indigenous Filmmaker Series launched in 2008 with Indigenous Canadian filmmaker Jules Koostachin at the helm. In 2009, FeFF produced the inaugural Young Filmmaker Development Workshop, a mentorship for debut female filmmakers. To date, FeFF has produced 46 short debut films, 26 by Indigenous filmmakers, and all had their premieres at Female Eye. FeFF continues to provide a dedicated showcase for local directors with the Toronto Filmmaker Series, which held its inaugural event in 2001. The Script Development Program, open to both men and women, celebrates its 15th edition in 2022.

 

The BEST IN THE BIZ TRIBUTE celebrates 2022Honorary Director Valerie Buhagiar on Saturday, June 11, at 1PM. In Buhagiar’s latest feature, “Carmen,” based on true events, 50-year-old Carmen finds her voice and her true calling and liberates villagers in a small Maltese town(Supported by Telefilm Canada’s Promotion Program.)

 

“When I answered Leslie Ann Coles’s call about receiving the Honorary Director’s Award at this year’s Female Eye Film Festival, I felt a warm embrace, along with the accumulation of years sitting at my kitchen table writing, organizing, and envisioning project after project,” says Buhagiar. “FeFF has presented four of my films since 2008. This year they are opening the festival with my fourth feature film as writer/director: ‘Carmen.’ It is communities like FeFF and the WIDC [Women In the Director’s Chair] that have propelled me forward to reveal my true voice in cinema. The greatest gift you can give someone is inspiration, and the team at FeFF has done this over and over again. I am truly grateful and honoured. Thank you.”

 

Other notable Canadian features, supported by Telefilm Canada, include “We’re All in This Together,” a clever adaptation of the novel by Amy Jones written by, directed by, and starring Katie Boland in her debut directorial feature film; “The Kissing Game,” a passionate urban fantasy and solo performance that explores love, betrayal, friendship, and identity directed by newcomer Montreal filmmaker Véa; “Be Still,” by Elizabeth Lazebnik, an homage to Canadian photographer Hannah Maynard, who was 40 years ahead of the Surrealist movement. FeFF also celebrates Toronto media artist Edie Steiner with a film retrospective and artist talk.

 

“In this ever-evolving landscape, supporting women in film and uplifting their work continues to be a priority at Telefilm Canada,” said Christa Dickenson, Executive Director & CEO, Telefilm Canada. “Increased career development, training for women of colour and Black women at all levels of experience, and enhanced data collection are all integral to supporting more diverse storytellers in Canada. Celebrating 20 years of believing and elevating Canadian talent both nationally and on a global scale, we’d love to thank Female Eye Film Festival for all the work they do in putting talented Canadians in the spotlight.”

 

Foreign film highlights include documentaries “Mama Irene: Healer of the Andes,” directed by Elisabeth Möhlmann and Bettina Ehrhardt, a documentary that features a remarkable 84-year-old shaman from Peru who draws upon endangered Indigenous knowledge and traditions (Peru); “Independent Miss Craigie,” directed by Lizzie Thynne, which captures the extraordinary life story of Jill Craigie, one of the first women to direct documentaries in the United Kingdom, whose work has long been neglected (UK); “Moonlight Shadow Wall,” directed by Shiman Ma, which tells the story of three families who reside at the foot of the ancient city of Xi’an who embrace cultural traditions while trying to embrace a new era (China); and “Forbidden Womanhood,” directed by Maryam Zahirirmehr, a poetic and symbolic portrayal of betrayal and loss in which 12-year-old Mahi’s mother refuses to tell her how a woman gets pregnant (Iran).

 

This year’s INDUSTRY INITIATIVES, supported by Ontario Creates and ACTRA Fraternal Benefits (AFBS), feature industry panel discussions, script readings, the 10th Annual Live Pitch, the Directors’ Roundtable, and a panel dedicated to women in virtual production who hold positions of creative control in this quickly evolving pipeline. This panel will showcase excerpts from their work and explore the topics of democratized storytelling, female authorship, and creative empowerment. The filmmakers will use process videos to demonstrate aspects of the VP workflow as it pertains to pre-visualization, production, and creative collaboration.

 

“For the past 20 years, in an industry where female filmmakers and screenwriters have been underrepresented, FeFF has brought a female perspective and diversity to the art of screen-based storytelling,” said Ron Zammit, President and CEO of AFBS. “AFBS is proud to stand behind FeFF as a long-term supporter.”

 

“WIDC is delighted to co-present the annual Directors’ Roundtable at the 20th anniversary of the Female Eye Film Festival. While the festival returns to in-person screenings and festivities, hosting the roundtable online offers an opportunity to enrich and expand the festival’s community of women and non-binary screen directors and guests across the globe,” says Dr. Carol Whiteman, co-creator and producer of Women In the Director’s Chair (WIDC), which recently celebrated its 25th anniversary.

 

In 2014, Coles began international collaborations with the KIN International Film Festival (Armenia); the Flying Broom International Women’s Film Festival (Turkey); FemCine (Chile); the Los Angeles Women’s International Film Festival (USA); and Doctober (USA). In 2021, Coles juried films for the Beirut International Women Film Festival (BIWFF; Lebanon) and the Porto Femme International Film Festival (Portugal). FeFF shares a tradition of mentoring young women on their debut films, which premiere at our festivals with Beirut and Women’s Voices Now (WVN; USA). FeFF proudly presents a selection of short films directed by female youth produced by BIWFF and WVN. We also look forward to co-presenting a selection of dance-on-film shorts with Dance Camera West (Los Angeles) and shorts culled from Porto Femme.

 

Special thanks to our sponsors: Telefilm Canada, Ontario Creates, ACTRA Fraternal Benefit Society (AFBS), Cinespace Film Studios, ACTRA National, and Women In the Director’s Chair and Encore+.

 

TIFF tickets are available at ticketmaster.com/tiff3

Discounts available for seniors and students and TIFF members.

 

Follow Female Eye Film Festival:  

facebook.com/FemaleEye 

instagram.com/femaleeye 

twitter.com/FemaleEye 

femaleeyefilmfestival.com 

 

Media inquiries: 

Sasha Stoltz Publicity & Management: 

Sasha Stoltz | Sasha@sashastoltzpublicity.com | 416.579.4804 

Sasha Stoltz Publicity:

Sasha Stoltz | Sasha@sashastoltzpublicity.com | 416.579.4804

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Media Advisory: Ministers Stoodley and Davis to Attend Run for Women in Support of Stella's Circle – News Releases – Government of Newfoundland and Labrador

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On Sunday, June 26 the Honourable Sarah Stoodley, Minister of Digital Government and Service NL and the Honourable Bernard Davis, Minister of Environment and Climate Change, will attend the LOVE YOU’ by Shoppers Drug Mart Run for Women, in support of women’s mental health programs at Stella’s Circle.

The event is set to begin at 8:45 a.m. at Quidi Vidi Lake, 115 The Boulevard, St. John’s.

The Run for Women is held in 18 cities throughout Canada and focuses on Women’s Mental Health. Funds raised go to this year’s charity partner, Stella’s Circle, to specifically support programming at Naomi House and the Just Us Women’s Centre. The event also promotes physical movement as a means to creating better positive mental health outcomes.

-30-

Media contacts
Krista Dalton
Digital Government and Service NL
709-729-4748, 685-6492
kristadalton@gov.nl.ca

Lynn Robinson
Environment and Climate Change
709-729-5449, 691-9466
lynnrobinson@gov.nl.ca

2022 06 24
1:40 pm

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Newly appointed Toronto councillor resigns after controversial social media posts resurfaced – CTV News Toronto

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A newly installed Toronto councillor has resigned after her old social media posts, which appear to show homophobic content, were unearthed hours following her appointment.

Rosemarie Bryan was appointed by city council as the new councillor for Ward 1 – Etobicoke North during a special meeting on Friday, filling the vacancy left by Michael Ford, who ran in June’s provincial election and won.

After she was appointed, however, Bryan’s alleged past social media activities, which appears to show her sharing anti-LGBTQ content, were brought to light.

Friday was the start of the Pride Toronto’s Festival Weekend, which features the return of the Pride Parade to downtown streets on Sunday following a two-year hiatus.

Several councillors posted to social media that had they known about Bryan’s posts, they would not have voted for her to fill the seat.

“A majority of councillors would have never this (way) had this information been brought forward. We relied too heavily on the recommendation being made by former councillor,” Coun. Mike Layton tweeted.

“We need to reopen this debate.”

Of the 23 councillors who cast their ballots, 21 voted for Bryan, including Mayor John Tory.

Coun. Josh Matlow, one of the two councillors who did not vote for Bryan, called for her resignation, tweeting that he does not believe “anyone who supports hate and bigotry should be a Toronto city councillor, or hold any public office for that matter. This is disgraceful.”

On Friday night, Bryan released a statement announcing that she is resigning, saying it’s the best way to continue serving those who love and support her in Etobicoke North.

Bryan said she is devastated that her past online posts are being “thrown against my decades of commitment to the community.”

“I recognize councillors were not aware of those posts before today’s discussion and now that they are, I recognize many would not have cast their vote for me. I don’t want to hurt all those who supported me and I remain committed to helping my community in any and every way I can,” she said.

In a statement, Tory said while Bryan made a “strong case” to council for her appointment, her past social media posts are “not acceptable.”

“I totally disagree with any homophobic or transphobic views. I absolutely support our 2SLGBTQ+ residents. City Councillors are expected to set an example when it comes to consistency with our shared values,” Tory said.

“I would not have voted for this appointment had I been aware of these posts and I know that is the sentiment of the vast majority of council who also voted today.”

He said it was appropriate for Bryan to resign.

“The upset this has caused everyone involved is extremely unfortunate. This is especially unfortunate on the very weekend when we are celebrating the progress we have made together,” Tory said, adding that he has asked staff to review the overall appointment process.

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S.Korean leader's informal media events are a break with tradition – SaltWire Halifax powered by The Chronicle Herald

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By Soo-hyang Choi

SEOUL (Reuters) – South Korean leader Yoon Suk-yeol has departed from years of tradition by holding informal daily media events to field questions on topics ranging from inflation and ties with neighbouring North Korea to the first lady and even boyband BTS.

Such wide-ranging access to the president was previously unheard of. It stems from Yoon’s decision to move his office out of the official Blue House, whose previous occupants largely steered clear of such interactions over more than seven decades.

“It’s apparently helping Yoon dispel worries about his lack of political experience and giving him a sense of where public opinion is at,” said Eom Kyeong-young, a political commentator based in the capital, Seoul.

Yoon, a former prosecutor-general, entered politics just a year ago, before winning the presidency in March by a margin of just 0.7%, the narrowest in South Korea’s history.

Upon his inauguration in May, Yoon moved the presidential office to the compound of South Korea’s defence ministry, describing the official residence as the symbol of an “imperial presidency”, and vowing not to “hide behind” his aides.

His liberal predecessor, Moon Jae-in, had rarely held news conferences, and almost always filtered his communication with the media, and the public, through layers of secretaries.

Analysts see Yoon’s daily freewheeling sessions as part of a broader communications strategy that lets him drive policy initiatives and present himself as a confident, approachable leader.

The campaign has also allayed public suspicions about the newcomer to politics, they say.

Polls show the new strategy helping to win support and much-needed political capital for Yoon in his effort to hasten recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic, in a parliament dominated by the opposition Democratic Party.

Although Yoon’s approval rating dipped to 47.6% in a recent survey, slightly lower than the disapproval figure of 47.9%, another June poll showed communication was the reason most frequently cited by those who favoured him.

“The sweeping victory of Yoon’s conservative party in June local elections shows the public is not so much against the new administration,” said Eom.

Incumbents from Yoon’s People Power Party (PPP) defeated challengers for the posts of mayor in the two biggest cities of Seoul and the port city of Busan in that contest, while its candidates won five of seven parliamentary seats.

Eom attributed Yoon’s low approval rating from the beginning of his term to inflation risks that threaten to undermine an economic recovery and his lack of a support base as a new politician.

But some critics say Yoon’s sessions raise the chances that he could make mistakes.

“He could make one mistake a day,” Yun Kun-young of the opposition party wrote on Facebook last week, saying the new practice could be “the biggest risk factor” for the government.

The presidential office could not immediately be reached for comment.

Yoon has already faced criticism for controversial remarks made during the morning briefings, such as one in defence of his nominee for education minister, who has a record of driving under the influence of alcohol years ago.

But the daily meetings and public reaction would ultimately help the government to shape policy better, said Shin Yul, a professor of political science at Myongji University in Seoul.

“It might be burdensome for his aides for now, but will be an advantage in the long term,” Shin said. “A slip of the tongue cannot be a bigger problem than a policy failure.”

(Reporting by Soo-hyang Choi; Editing by Clarence Fernandez)

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